2024-25 NAPABA Leadership Advancement Program Now Accepting Applications through March 3, 2024

Are you a mid-career attorney seeking to cultivate your leadership style and build community? NAPABA invites you to apply for the 2024-25 NAPABA Leadership Advancement Program (LAP). This is your unique opportunity to transform as a leader, ground your career vision, and foster genuine relationships with peers within the profession. Learn more about this year-long experiential program. The deadline to apply is just three weeks away.

NAPABA provides its members with exclusive leadership opportunities like this to help members raise their professional profile and develop leadership skills. As a current NAPABA Member, we urge you to apply for this preeminent program.

If you know someone who would be interested in this opportunity, forward them this email.

Questions? Visit our website for more details or contact Sumbal Abid, Operations Manager.

NAPABA Applauds Eleventh Circuit Ruling Halting Enforcement of Florida’s Discriminatory Alien Land Law

For Immediate Release: 
Date: February 2, 2024 
ContactRahat N. Babar, Deputy Executive Director for Policy 

WASHINGTON – In the ongoing litigation against Florida’s discriminatory alien land law (“SB 264”), the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit granted a preliminary injunction yesterday in favor of two of the plaintiffs and halted enforcement of the law against them. In temporarily blocking SB 264, the court held that the plaintiffs demonstrated a substantial likelihood that the statute is preempted by federal law and that they have shown an imminent risk that the law would cause them irreparable harm. The plaintiffs, lawfully present Chinese immigrants, first brought the suit because they were stymied in their efforts to purchase homes when the law went into effect.

“We are grateful that the court recognized the real harm that discriminatory statutes such as SB 264 are imposing on the Asian American community,” said Anna Mercado Clark, President of NAPABA. “As litigation continues, NAPABA will continue to oppose alien land laws, whether in the halls of Congress, in statehouses, or in court, until these discriminatory policies return to the dustbin of history, where they belong.”

In a robust concurrence, Judge Nancy Abudu acknowledged that “SB 264 was enacted for the specific purpose of targeting people of Chinese descent.” Judge Abudu concluded that the plaintiffs have shown a substantial likelihood that statute also violated the Equal Protection Clause of the United States Constitution. In doing so, Judge Abudu excoriated the District Court’s fraught reliance on the widely discredited century-old Terrace v. Thompson, 263 U.S. 197 (1923), case, determining that it “may have had support in 1923, but it is now 2024” and such laws are now subject to strict scrutiny.

NAPABA, together with its four Florida affiliates, joined an amicus brief before the Eleventh Circuit in the case, continuing our long history for over a decade of leading efforts to overcome the state’s legacy of anti-Asian alien land laws. This includes when Florida became the last state in the United States over five years ago to abolish such discriminatory language from its constitution, only to enact SB 264 last year. Throughout the country, NAPABA and its affiliates continue to fight these discriminatory measures through legislative advocacy and educating lawmakers and the wider public on the painful history and legal implications of wrongfully restricting the property rights of Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander communities.

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The National Asian Pacific American Bar Association (NAPABA) represents the interests of over 60,000 Asian Pacific American (APA) legal professionals and nearly 90 national, state, and local APA bar associations. NAPABA is a leader in addressing civil rights issues confronting Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander communities. Through its national network, NAPABA provides a strong voice for increased diversity of the federal and state judiciaries, advocates for equal opportunity in the workplace, works to eliminate hate crimes and anti-immigrant sentiment, and promotes the professional development of people of all backgrounds in the legal profession.

NAPABA 2024 1L SUMMER INTERNSHIP PROGRAM

Prudential Financial, Inc. in Partnership with NAPABA

NAPABA is pleased to partner with Prudential Financial, Inc. (Prudential) to provide a meaningful summer internship opportunity for a highly motivated first-year law student. Through this partnership, NAPABA and Prudential will select a student to join the 2024 summer law intern class at Prudential.

The summer internship will provide interns with the opportunity to work with attorneys who support the broad reach of Prudential’s businesses.

The 1L summer internship will run for 10 weeks, from May 28th to August 2nd, 2024. The starting hourly wage in this position will be $31.00. In addition, if an intern works beyond their standard regular schedule, they will be compensated for all time worked including, where applicable, overtime.

The program will be hybrid at Prudential’s Newark, NJ location. A minimum of 2-3 days a week will be in the office for general intern programming.

Deadline to apply: 5:00 pm EST on Monday, January 22, 2024

Apply Now


If you have any questions, please contact Naomi Mortensen, Strategic Partnerships Manager. All correspondence must include “Prudential Internship” in the subject line.

Prudential and its affiliates are Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employers and are committed to diversity in our workforce.

AABANY’s Paint & Sip Night: An Evening of Creativity, Connection, and Fun!

On January 16, a chilly winter evening in the heart of midtown Manhattan, AABANY’s Student Outreach, Career Placement, and Mentorship Committees came together to host a memorable event that combined artistry, camaraderie, and a dash of culture. It was the much-anticipated “Paint & Sip Night” held at the Painting Lounge. The event brought together a vibrant mix of practicing attorneys and enthusiastic law students, all eager to unwind and tap into their creative sides. The focal point of the evening: capturing the iconic New York City skyline on canvas while indulging in fine wine and delectable Korean cuisine.

As the attendees gathered, the Painting Lounge provided the perfect ambiance for the creative journey that lay ahead. Easels, canvases, and an array of vibrant paints awaited the eager participants. Under the guidance of an expert instructor, everyone had the opportunity to channel their inner artists and bring their visions of the NYC skyline to life. Sipping on wine and enjoying the company of fellow legal professionals and aspiring lawyers, the atmosphere was filled with laughter, shared stories, and a palpable sense of community. Korean cuisine enhanced the evening’s festivities. Attendees savored a variety of mouthwatering dishes that reflected the rich flavors of Korean culture. From savory bulgogi to spicy cucumber kimchi, the culinary journey was a treat for the taste buds, providing a culinary complement to the artistic expressions taking shape on canvas.

We extend our heartfelt thanks to the Student Outreach, Career Placement, and Mentorship Committees for organizing this fantastic event, and to all the attendees who made it an evening to remember.

All Rise! An Appeal for Moot Court Judges

The ABA Law Student Division would like to invite you to judge the National Appellate Advocacy Competition (NAAC) in Brooklyn on February 22-24, 2024, at the United States District Court for the Eastern District of New York.

Register Here

You be the judge, literally!
Spend a few hours as a Supreme Court Justice without the confirmation hearings! All rounds take place in a courtroom and robes are provided for all competition judges.

Give back and mentor law students
This opportunity will fulfill your need to impart wisdom onto the next generation of lawyers. We are looking for lawyers and judges to sit on the Supreme Court to hear oral arguments and provide feedback on the advocacy skills of each team.

CLE Information
Attorneys acting as judges in moot court competitions may self-report their participation to claim CLE credit. Rules, calculations, and limits vary by state.

Make a day of it. Sign up for one, two, or more rounds. Or invite your colleagues and register as a group. Register Here

The rounds are scheduled as follows:
Round 1: Thursday, February 22 (3:30 pm-7:45 pm)
Round 2: Friday, February 23 (3:30 pm-7:45 pm)
Round 3: Saturday, February 24 (8:30 am-12:45 pm)
Round 4: Saturday, February 24 (1:00 pm-3:30 pm)
Round 5: Saturday, February 24 (3:30 pm-6:00 pm)

For your colleagues across the country, there are also regionals in Boston, Philadelphia, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, and San Francisco!

Direct any questions to:

Erica M. Zepeda
American Bar Association
Program Manager, Early Career Strategy
Law Student Division
321 N. Clark, Chicago, IL  60654
T: 312.988.5671
[email protected]

ICYMI: NAPABA Joins Coalition Partners and Applauds the Removal of Alien Land Law Provision from the FY2024 National Defense Authorization Act

For Immediate Release: 
Date: January 12, 2024 
ContactRahat N. Babar, Deputy Executive Director for Policy 

For Immediate Release
Date: January 11, 2024

CONTACT
Michelle Boykins, (202) 296-2300, ext. 0144
[email protected]

Louise Liu, (202) 657-7413
[email protected]

Asian Americans Advancing Justice – AAJC Applauds Removal of the Rounds Amendment from the Fiscal Year 2024 National Defense Authorization Act

Discriminatory amendment would have prohibited certain foreign nationals, including Chinese foreign nationals, from owning land in the U.S.

WASHINGTON – Asian Americans Advancing Justice – Asian American Justice Center (Advancing Justice – AAJC) today commended lawmakers’ decision to strike S. 2226 § 1086 (Senate Amendment 813) introduced by Sen. Mike Rounds (R-ND) amendment in the Fiscal Year 2024 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA).

If included, this discriminatory amendment would have effectively prohibited certain foreign nationals, including Chinese foreign nationals, from purchasing U.S. agricultural land — continuing the pattern of a nation-wide resurgence of so-called “alien” land laws that have been introduced in at least 27 states and enacted in at least eight.

A coalition of Asian American and allied organizations took swift and sustained action to oppose this amendment and urge lawmakers to take it out of the final conference report language.

The Rounds amendment is the continuation of a long legacy of unnecessary legislation that leads to harmful profiling of and violence towards the Asian American community. In America’s history such legislation unfairly targeted Asian Americans in the 19th and 20th centuries through anti-immigration laws, land ownership prohibitions, incarceration of Americans of Japanese descent during World War II, and other efforts that sought to exclude members of the community. This racist and xenophobic behavior has continued from the murder of Vincent Chin in 1982 to the murders of Sikh Americans and the racial profiling of Muslim Americans in a post-9/11 environment. Asian Americans are too often considered to be “perpetual foreigners.”

Approximately 27 organizations joined Asian American Advancing Justice – AAJC in submitting a formal letter to NDAA conferees Senate Armed Services Chairman Jack Reed and Ranking Member Roger Ricker, as well as House Armed Services Mike Rogers and Ranking Member Adam Smith, urging them to “prohibit the inclusion of provisions that would effectively bar foreign nationals – including Chinese foreign nationals – from acquiring certain types of U.S. agricultural land.” The letter continued by encouraging them to “strike provisions that stoke racial animus, bias, and discrimination, as well as undermine Asian American participation in the Armed Services.”

John C. Yang, President and Executive Director of Advancing Justice – AAJC said, “We are very pleased that Congress listened to the concerns from our communities and did not include this harmful amendment in the NDAA. We are not naïve to the legitimate and credible threats that the Chinese Communist Party has on U.S. national security interests when it comes to the issue of espionage, and we are certain that Congress and the federal government can take a more responsible and targeted approach to combating foreign malign influence that does not result in the racial profiling of our community members.”

“Like so many similar discriminatory laws and bills of this nations, the Rounds amendment would have ensnared innocent Chinese individuals because the language failed to meaningfully distinguish between entities from China and individuals from China,” said Joanna YangQing Derman, Director of Anti-Profiling, Civil Rights and National Security at Advancing Justice – AAJC. “We are proud to have worked with a strong coalition of partners to call out this discrimination and put Congress and the government on notice that we will push back on any bills that cause harm to our communities.”

“As an organization representing Iranian Americans, it is critically important to underscore that people are not their governments. Equating the two is what led to the creation of the Rounds amendment, and we will continue to combat legislation that seeks to enshrine blatant xenophobia and undermine civil rights. We are grateful to our multiethnic coalition and network of volunteers who worked tirelessly to advocate against this amendment until its defeat,” said Jamal Abdi, President of National Iranian American Council Action.

“The National Asian Pacific American Bar Association (NAPABA) and its affiliates across the country have worked to combat discriminatory anti-Asian alien land laws. They are a relic from the early 20th century and ought to remain in the dustbin of history. Instead of focusing on adversarial governmental entities, these bills instead target innocent individuals and wrongfully perpetuates harmful stereotypes about the loyalties of Asian Americans. While policymakers are free to address the legitimate national security concerns of the United States, they may not pursue discriminatory policies on the backs of the Asian American community,” said Priya Purandare, Executive Director of NAPABA.

“We commend the removal of the Rounds Amendment from the NDAA,” said Cynthia Choi, Co-Founder of Stop AAPI Hate and Co-Executive Director of Chinese for Affirmative Action. “Had this xenophobic measure been enacted, it would have contributed to the alarming surge in anti-Asian political scapegoating we’re seeing today. Policies like this fuel the harmful ‘perpetual foreigner’ trope that wrongly paints Asian Americans as outsiders and suspects in the country we call home — further stoking hate against our communities. We firmly believe that our leaders can and should address legitimate national security threats without resorting to measures that scapegoat entire groups of people and worsen anti-Asian racism and discrimination.”

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Asian Americans Advancing Justice – AAJC has a mission to advance the civil and human rights of Asian Americans and to build and promote a fair and equitable society for all. Visit our website at advancingjustice-aajc.org.

The National Asian Pacific American Bar Association (NAPABA) represents the interests of over 60,000 Asian Pacific American (APA) legal professionals and nearly 90 national, state, and local APA bar associations. NAPABA is a leader in addressing civil rights issues confronting Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander communities. Through its national network, NAPABA provides a strong voice for increased diversity of the federal and state judiciaries, advocates for equal opportunity in the workplace, works to eliminate hate crimes and anti-immigrant sentiment, and promotes the professional development of people of all backgrounds in the legal profession.

NAPABA | 1612 K St. NW, Suite 300 | Washington, DC 20006 | www.napaba.org

Thank You to Our Volunteers at the Queens Pro Bono Clinic in September

On September 6th, 2023, AABANY held its Queens Pro Bono Legal Clinic at the AAFE One Flushing Community Center. The clinic met with 31 clients, coming in with questions about housing, immigration, family law, and civil litigation. Volunteer attorneys and interpreters patiently addressed client concerns, answering questions and connecting them to lawyers through AABANY’s Legal Referral and Information Service (LRIS). We are extremely grateful to have volunteers willing to start early at 6pm and stay beyond 8:30pm to finish speaking with the clients.

We thank the AABANY Pro Bono & Community Service (PBCS) Committee and Asian Americans for Equality for organizing and hosting this event. We also thank Council Member Sandra Ung for partnering with us to make this service available to the community.

Thank you to our volunteers for supporting the clinic. Your time and dedication are essential for delivering crucial assistance to individuals seeking legal guidance. We extend our heartfelt gratitude to:

Volunteer Attorneys:

Richard In
Lina Lee
Beatrice Leong
Lord Chester So
May Wong
Gary Yeung

Interpreters and Coordinators:

Gabriel Hisugan
Jocelyn Jao
Willow Liu
Nuala Naranjo-Odoherty

Here is a list of upcoming Pro Bono Clinics:

● Brooklyn, October 14, from 12:30 pm to 3:30 pm, at Chinese-American Planning Council, Inc., 4101 8th Avenue. Sign up here to volunteer.

● Manhattan, October 18, from 6:30pm to 8:30pm, and AAFE Community Center, 111 Norfolk Street. Sign up here to volunteer.

● Queens, November 1, from 6:30pm – 8:30pm, at AAFE One Flushing Community Center, 133-29 41st Ave 2nd Floor. Sign up here to volunteer.

Click here for more information about our Pro Bono Clinics and the PBCS Committee.

NAPABA Indiana Advocacy Update

Dear NAPABA Community,

With 50 days remaining before the start of the 2023 NAPABA Convention in Indianapolis, I wish to update you on NAPABA’s work in Indiana along with our advocacy efforts broadly.

In April 2023, we announced our Indiana Advocacy Action Plan following the decision from the Board of Governors to remain in Indianapolis for the 2023 NAPABA Convention. The Plan’s four-prong strategy aimed to meaningfully engage community stakeholders in Indiana and advance the dignity and interests of the LGBTQ+ and AANHPI communities in the time leading up to and beyond the Convention. Since then, I can report to you on the following actions:

  1. Immediate Investment. NAPABA and Indiana Legal Services, Inc. (ILS), announced a partnership to deliver direct legal support to LGBTQ+ and immigrant communities in Indiana. The partnership will fund law student interns at ILS starting this fall for the 2023-2024 academic year. The legal internships will be housed within the ILS LGBTQ+ Project and Immigrants’ and Language Rights Center. Financial support for these legal internships was generously provided by the NAPABA Law Foundation’s Underserved Communities Fellowship.
  2. Lasting Impact. Starting this October, NAPABA–in partnership with the Asian Pacific American Bar Association of Indiana, Alliance for Justice, and Dentons Bingham Greenebaum LLP–will be convening a wide array of community leaders in Indianapolis for our multi-part civic engagement series entitled, “Joining Forces, Building Community and Empowerment.” The workshop is designed for Indiana leaders to build organizational, operational, and advocacy skills in their efforts to advocate and better serve their communities. NAPABA will host additional workshops in the months ahead, including another convening of community leaders on Thursday, November 9, 2023, at the Convention, and culminate in a day of advocacy activities at the Indiana Statehouse in 2024.
  3. Showcasing Our Values. The 2023 NAPABA Convention in Indianapolis is centered on uplifting NAPABA’s values and our community. Our Friday Plenary Luncheon program will focus on “Gender Equality and the Rights of Transgender Athletes,” featuring Justice Sabrina McKenna of the Supreme Court of Hawai`i as the moderator. At our Gala program on Saturday, the keynote speaker will be attorney and civil rights activist Mia Yamamoto, a prominent leader and advocate for human rights and for the rights of the LGBTQ+ and AANHPI communities. During the Convention’s substantive program, we will highlight issues such as AANHPIs and the fight for marriage equality, a reflection on the civil rights movement, how our community can advance the cause for justice, #WhyWomenLeave, and more. 
  4. Beyond Indiana. Though we are focused on Indiana, NAPABA remains at the forefront in our core advocacy work across the nation. 
    • We continue to oppose vigorously alien land laws that would strip the rights of AANHPIs to pursue a livelihood and fair housing. NAPABA and our affiliates are engaged with state and federal policymakers to oppose such laws along with grassroots community leaders and the press. Along with our coalition partners, NAPABA has cautioned Congress to be mindful of its rhetoric and “to consider the impact that proposed legislation could have on AANHPI communities, and to work with AANHPI groups to find ways to address national security concerns while creating an environment that welcomes people who are committed to the success and safety of our country.” We have raised the alarm over a recent amendment to the National Defense Authorization Act that, if enacted, would impose restrictions on individuals from certain countries like China to purchase agricultural land. In court, we are supporting, as amicus curiae, litigation challenging Florida’s discriminatory statute.
    • In the aftermath of U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Students for Fair Admissions v. UNC/Harvard, NAPABA has not only presented educational programs to our members about the ruling, but also engaged with partners to explore best avenues to support diversity, equity, and inclusion efforts across the profession. 
    • NAPABA has stood in solidarity with the LGBTQ+ community. For example, in the face of federal legislation that targeted the transgender community, NAPABA opposed a bill that would ban transgender and intersex girls and women from participating in school sporting activities that align with their gender identities. Such harmful and discriminatory policies are wholly inconsistent with NAPABA values. Similarly, NAPABA denounced a misguided decision from the U.S. Supreme Court in 303 Creative LLC v. Aubrey Elenis, which held that a website design business–notwithstanding state anti-discrimination laws–may refuse to deliver services to same-sex couples. We called on Congress again to pass the Equality Act, which would amend federal law to prohibit discrimination on the basis of sex, sexual orientation, and gender identity.
    • NAPABA endorsed the Southeast Asian Deportation Relief Act of 2023, a bill that would deliver relief to Southeast Asian American refugees and create a pathway for the return of nearly 2,000 refugees to the United States who have already been removed to Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia. 
    • Recently, in another step toward equity, NAPABA endorsed California Senate Bill 403, which would add caste as a protected characteristic under California’s civil rights laws, and called for a ban on caste discrimination throughout the nation. 
This is only a snapshot of our efforts. Undoubtedly, we are making progress, but we are nowhere near done. As California just recognized when it lifted the ban on publicly funded travel to other states with objectionable laws targeting the LGBTQ+ community, NAPABA believes in the importance and the power of showing up. Our work is only possible because of the strength, energy, and passion of our members, our committees, our affiliates, and our sponsors. So many of you step up each and every day to better our community, often in the shadows of the public eye, with the only hope that the next generation will enjoy the gains that we endeavor to make today. We are incredibly grateful.

I look forward to seeing all of you in Indianapolis.
Warmly,

NAPABA and Jacksonville AABA Statement in Response to the Shooting in Jacksonville, Florida


For Immediate Release:
 
Date: August 28, 2023
ContactRahat N. Babar, Deputy Executive Director for Policy 

WASHINGTON – On the 60th anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington, the day, which started with a remembrance of the work remaining to achieve Dr. King’s dream for racial and social equity, ended in tragedy. This past Saturday afternoon on August 26, 2023, according to news reports, an individual armed with a handgun and an AR-15-style rifle that bore white supremacist markings shot and killed three people from the Black community at a store in Jacksonville, Florida. Local law enforcement officials have reported that the individual, who was white, left written evidence detailing his “disgusting ideology of hate” and that the shooting “was racially motivated, and he hated Black people.”

To say that our hearts are broken would be an understatement. We stand with the people of Jacksonville and with the families of the victims.

Throughout the history of the United States, we have seen – time and again – the devastating impacts of hate on our communities. Yet we must not yield and allow history to repeat itself. We cannot allow hate to hold our communities hostage. And we refuse to allow white supremacy any safe harbor.

NAPABA and the Jacksonville Asian American Bar Association remain committed to eradicating hate and making Dr. King’s vision a reality.

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The National Asian Pacific American Bar Association (NAPABA) represents the interests of over 60,000 Asian Pacific American (APA) legal professionals and nearly 90 national, state, and local APA bar associations. NAPABA is a leader in addressing civil rights issues confronting Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander communities. Through its national network, NAPABA provides a strong voice for increased diversity of the federal and state judiciaries, advocates for equal opportunity in the workplace, works to eliminate hate crimes and anti-immigrant sentiment, and promotes the professional development of people of all backgrounds in the legal profession.

The Jacksonville Asian American Bar Association (JAABA) is a voluntary bar association of attorneys, judges, and law students, who serve the Jacksonville and North Florida areas. JAABA is an affiliate member of the National Asian Pacific American Bar Association (the “NAPABA”) which represents the interests of over 60,000 Asian Pacific American (APA) legal professionals and nearly 90 national, state, and local APA bar associations. JAABA seeks to carry out the mission statement of NAPABA – promoting “justice, equity and opportunity for Asian Pacific Americans” and fostering “professional development, legal scholarship, advocacy and community involvement.” To that end, JAABA issued a joint statement with NAPABA regarding the racially-motivated attack that occurred in Jacksonville over the weekend; and reiterates its support of NAPABA’s values of “equality, community, advocacy, relationships, diversity, equity, inclusion, open-mindedness, and the health and wellbeing of our members” and the communities in which we live and serve.

NAPABA and Fred T. Korematsu Institute Form Pioneering Affiliation to Champion Civil Rights, Combat Anti-Asian Bias, and Promote Civic Empowerment

For Immediate Release: 
Date: August 24, 2023 
NAPABA Contact:
Priya Purandare, Executive Director
Fred T. Korematsu Institute Contact:
Michelle Mitchell, Communications Director

WASHINGTON – The National Asian Pacific American Bar Association (NAPABA) and the Fred T. Korematsu Institute, a 501(c)(3) national civil rights education organization based in San Francisco, announced a historic, groundbreaking affiliation formalizing their organizations’ longstanding relationship based on a shared interest in promoting civic participation, racial equity, and civil rights. The affiliation will strengthen the missions of both institutions by increasing resources and understanding and combating anti-Asian discrimination and bias through education and advocacy.

The Korematsu Institute was founded on the legacy of Fred Korematsu, a Japanese American who, in 1942, refused to comply with the World War II Executive Order to forcibly remove and incarcerate American Citizens of Japanese descent in prison camps. After he was arrested and convicted of defying the government’s order, he appealed his case to the United States Supreme Court. In an infamous decision that joins the ranks of Dred Scott v. Sandford and Plessy v. Ferguson, the Supreme Court ruled against him, holding that the incarceration was justified due to military necessity. After discovering that the government had withheld evidence and that the Solicitor General lied to the Court, Korematsu’s conviction was overturned in 1983 through a writ of Coram Nobis. In 1998, he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, our nation’s highest civilian honor, for his steadfast advocacy.

“My father’s decades-long fight against injustice in the face of discrimination was not only a legal and constitutional achievement, but a story of individual humanity that resonates with so many in this country,” said Dr. Karen Korematsu, Founder and President of the Korematsu Institute. “While law schools teach my father’s case to dissect legal principles, we cannot forget what he and so many other incarcerated Japanese Americans experienced on a human level during that dark period in our nation’s history.”

Founded in 1989, NAPABA is the nation’s largest Asian Pacific American membership organization representing the interests of 60,000 attorneys, judges, law professors, and law students. NAPABA is a leader in addressing civil rights issues confronting Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander communities. Without question, its values align with the spirit of Fred Korematsu’s advocacy and the Institute’s commitment to equality.

“Fred Korematsu’s case, and that of fellow Japanese American detainees such as Minoru Yasui, Gordon Hirabayashi and those of Fred Oyama and Sei Fujii, who challenged alien land laws after their properties were illegally seized, are not just historical precedents — they are the legal framework we use to fight discrimination against Asian Americans, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islanders,” said Sandra Leung, President of NAPABA. “It is important for all Americans to understand the leading role that Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders have played in shaping the civil rights jurisprudence of this nation.”

“Fred Korematsu’s journey, now more than ever, is a seminal, timeless story — especially at a time in our nation and in the world marked by growing ignorance and intolerance, fueled by advances in technology and the swiftness of disinformation,” said Peggy Saika, Board Chair of the Korematsu Institute. “We are confident that between the Institute’s long-standing care of his legacy and NAPABA’s reach in the legal community, we will safeguard the opportunity to continue learning the lessons of Fred Korematsu’s strength for generations to come.”

“This affiliation will amplify the impact of both NAPABA and the Korematsu Institute,” said Priya Purandare, Executive Director of NAPABA and the Korematsu Institute. “With the Institute’s expertise and K-12 educational and public resources, we can collectively bring the stories of Fred Korematsu and other AANHPI civil rights legal icons to inspire future generations of Americans.”

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The National Asian Pacific American Bar Association (NAPABA) represents the interests of over 60,000 Asian Pacific American (APA) legal professionals and nearly 90 national, state, and local APA bar associations. NAPABA is a leader in addressing civil rights issues confronting Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander communities. Through its national network, NAPABA provides a strong voice for increased diversity of the federal and state judiciaries, advocates for equal opportunity in the workplace, works to eliminate hate crimes and anti-immigrant sentiment, and promotes the professional development of people of all backgrounds in the legal profession.

The Fred T. Korematsu Institute, named after Presidential Medal of Freedom recipient Fred Korematsu, is a national education advocacy organization committed to promoting civic participation and education to advance racial equity, social justice, and human rights for all. Through its educational programs, media and exhibits, and speaking engagements, the Korematsu Institute inspires people and organizations to, as Fred said, “stand up for what is right.”