NAPABA Announces 2018 President’s Awards Recipients

The National Asian Pacific American Bar Association (NAPABA) is proud to present the 2018 NAPABA President’s Award to Karen Korematsu (Founder & Executive Director, The Fred T. Korematsu Institute) and Dale Minami and Don Tamaki (Partners, Minami Tamaki LLP; members of the Korematsu Coram Nobis legal team) for their work on StopRepeatingHistory.Org, a campaign to educate the public about Japanese American incarceration during WWII and the present-day dangers of similar policies targeting individuals based on race, national origin, or religion. The NAPABA President’s Award is given to NAPABA members who demonstrate an exceptional commitment to NAPABA, the legal community, and the broader Asian Pacific American community.

Karen Korematsu, founder of the Fred T. Korematsu Institute and daughter of the late Fred T. Korematsu, is a leading voice in advocating for civil liberties for all communities, and in 2015, she became NAPABA’s first non-lawyer member. Dale Minami and Dom Tamaki have been involved in significant litigation involving the civil rights of Asian Pacific Americans and other underrepresented groups and served on the pro bono team that reopened the landmark Korematsu v. United States Supreme Court Case, overturning Fred Korematsu’s conviction.

“This year, it is my honor to present the NAPABA President’s Award to Karen Korematsu, Dale Minami, and Don Tamaki for their tireless commitment to the StopRepeatingHistory.Org campaign,” said NAPABA President Pankit J. Doshi. “I applaud their efforts to relate the experiences of Japanese American internment during World War II to the infringement on civil rights and civil liberties that many religious and ethnic minorities face today. Their voices have been critical to ensuring that we as a nation never repeat that dark chapter of our history, including as a result of the travel ban impacting Muslim and immigrant communities,  which NAPABA vehemently opposed. While their work in civil rights for decades has already blazed a trail, their continued efforts to advocate for our community without rest is particularly inspirational in today’s world.”

The 2018 NAPABA President’s Award will be presented at the 2018 NAPABA Convention in Chicago, IL, on Nov. 10, 2018. NAPABA congratulates Karen Korematsu, Dale Minami, and Don Tamaki as the 2018 NAPABA President’s Award recipients.

NAPABA and AAABA Respond to the Pardon of Sheriff Joe Arpaio

For Immediate Release
Aug. 28, 2017

                                                   For More Information, Contact:
                                                   Brett Schuster, Communications Manager
                                                   bschuster@napaba.org, 202-775-9555

WASHINGTON — The National Asian Pacific American Bar Association (NAPABA) and the Arizona Asian American Bar Association (AAABA) are disappointed by the pardon of former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio.

“The Constitution affords the President wide latitude in the ability to issue a presidential pardon. While we respect this authority, we are concerned about the message the expedited pardon of former sheriff Joe Arpaio sends to the public in a political way that undermines the rule of law and the judicial system,” said NAPABA President Cyndie M. Chang. “As attorneys, we find it troubling that a law enforcement officer would be pardoned and absolved of responsibility for ignoring a federal court order in a civil rights case. Various organizations, leaders from both parties, and communities of color have expressed shock and concern over the effect of the pardon on the public’s trust in the judiciary and the ability to seek recourse for those whose rights are violated.”

The AAABA board of directors made the following statement: “The Arizona Asian American Bar Association condemns President Trump’s pardon of former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio. AAABA’s mission is to ‘promote and advocate for justice, equity, equality, inclusion, and opportunity through the Arizona legal profession.’ Accordingly, AAABA is, and has been, against Arpaio’s policies of racial profiling and discrimination, which terrorized the Hispanic and minority communities for many years. Arpaio’s conviction after a five-day trial represented a just result of the systematic violation of civil rights and racial discrimination of the Hispanic and minority communities over many years committed under Arpaio’s guidance and supervision. Arpaio’s conviction finally brought some closure and justice to his victims. The rule of law was upheld, and his conviction clearly demonstrated that no one was above the rule of law. President Trump’s pardon of Arpaio sends the wrong message to minority communities and the rest of the country. By pardoning Arpaio, President Trump has validated and endorsed injustice, discrimination, intolerance, racism, and disregard for the rule of law. This pardon only further divides this country, and is nothing more than a transparent decision to choose politics over justice and the rule of law. AAABA unequivocally condemns the pardon.”

Arpaio was convicted of criminal contempt by Judge Susan Bolton of the U.S. District Court of Arizona in July. He was found guilty of violating a court order by continuing to engage in illegal racial profiling and targeting of immigrants, stemming from a federal civil rights suit.

NAPABA and AAABA join their fellow national and local bar associations, including the American Bar Association and other diverse bar associations, in expressing disappointment over the pardon. In the current political climate where racial tensions are high in this country, it is important for NAPABA and its members continue to stand for justice, equity, and inclusion to preserve civil rights and to combat anti-immigrant backlash.

For more information, the media may contact Brett Schuster, NAPABA communications manager, at 202-775-9555 or bschuster@napaba.org.

The National Asian Pacific American Bar Association (NAPABA) is the national association of Asian Pacific American attorneys, judges, law professors, and law students. NAPABA represents the interests of almost 50,000 attorneys and approximately 75 national, state, and local Asian Pacific American bar associations. Its members include solo practitioners, large firm lawyers, corporate counsel, legal services and non-profit attorneys, and lawyers serving at all levels of government.

NAPABA continues to be a leader in addressing civil rights issues confronting Asian Pacific American communities. Through its national network of committees and affiliates, NAPABA provides a strong voice for increased diversity of the federal and state judiciaries, advocates for equal opportunity in the workplace, works to eliminate hate crimes and anti-immigrant sentiment, and promotes the professional development of people of color in the legal profession.

To learn more about NAPABA, visit www.napaba.org, like us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter (@NAPABA).

National Asian Pacific American Bar Association | 1612 K St. NW, Suite 510 | Washington, D.C. 20006 | www.napaba.org

AABANY Joins 2nd Circuit Amicus Brief on Sexual Discrimination

AABANY is pleased to announce that it is a co-signatory to the amicus brief in Zarda v. Altitude Express, Inc. 

In that case, Donald Zarda filed suit against his former employer, Altitude Express,
alleging that he had been terminated due to his sexual orientation, in
violation of the New York State Human Rights Law and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act. The amicus brief asks the 2nd Circuit to overturn existing precedent and expand the definition of

“sex” in Title VII of the Act to include sexual orientation in employment discrimination.

The following bar associations and organizations have also signed on:

  • The LGBT Bar Association of Greater New York
  • Anti-Defamation League
  • The Association of the Bar of the City of New York
  • Bay Area Lawyers for Individual Freedom
  • Hispanic National Bar Association
  • Legal Aid at Work
  • The National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance
  • New York County Lawyers Association
  • Women’s Bar Association of the State of New York 

Please click here to read the amicus brief.

NAPABA Honors the Legacy of Vincent Chin 35 Years after His Death


News Release

For Immediate Release
June 19, 2017

                                                   For More Information, Contact:
                                                   Brett Schuster, Communications Manager
                                                   bschuster@napaba.org, 202-775-9555

NAPABA Honors the Legacy of Vincent Chin 35 Years after His Death

WASHINGTON — The National Asian Pacific American Bar Association (NAPABA) commemorates the 35th anniversary of the murder of Vincent Chin. On June 19, 1982, Vincent Chin was beaten in a xenophobic attack during a wave of anti-Japanese sentiment and died a few days later. Vincent Chin’s death and his killers’ lenient sentences marked a turning point in Asian Pacific American civil rights advocacy in the United States.

“Vincent Chin’s murder inspired a generation of Asian Pacific American community leaders and lawyers to join an inclusive movement for civil rights,” said NAPABA President Cyndie M. Chang. “His death and subsequent trial underscored the importance of the Asian Pacific American community standing together in the fight against racism and advocating in the courts. We must continue to build on this legacy by continuing to oppose hate and xenophobia in all forms.”

Chin’s murder and the sentences of his killers highlighted the lack of a strong national voice for Asian Pacific Americans in the legal sector. Recognizing the need to establish such representation, NAPABA was founded in 1988 to give voice to values of justice, equity, and opportunity for Asian Pacific Americans. Since that time, NAPABA has been strongly committed to civil rights advocacy. With the current rise in hate crimes targeting diverse communities, NAPABA hopes that the historic weight of Chin’s case serves as a persistent reminder of the importance of protecting and advocating for civil rights.

NAPABA honors Vincent Chin’s memory and the continued legacy of advocacy that emerged in the wake of his death.

For more information, the media may contact Brett Schuster, NAPABA communications manager, at202-775-9555 or bschuster@napaba.org.

The National Asian Pacific American Bar Association (NAPABA) is the national association of Asian Pacific American attorneys, judges, law professors, and law students. NAPABA represents the interests of almost 50,000 attorneys and more than 80 national, state, and local Asian Pacific American bar associations. Its members include solo practitioners, large firm lawyers, corporate counsel, legal services and non-profit attorneys, and lawyers serving at all levels of government.

NAPABA continues to be a leader in addressing civil rights issues confronting Asian Pacific American communities. Through its national network of committees and affiliates, NAPABA provides a strong voice for increased diversity of the federal and state judiciaries, advocates for equal opportunity in the workplace, works to eliminate hate crimes and anti-immigrant sentiment, and promotes the professional development of people of color in the legal profession.

To learn more about NAPABA, visit www.napaba.org, like us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter (@NAPABA).

National Asian Pacific American Bar Association | 1612 K St. NW, Suite 510 | Washington, D.C. 20006 | www.napaba.org

From AALDEF: Support Civil Rights and Root for the Mets or Yankees!

Did you know that there’s a way that you can attend Mets and Yankees games and­ support the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund? AALDEF participates in a special program that helps to raise funds for public interest organizations. By purchasing tickets to select baseball games through this program, your cost will include the value of the ticket plus an additional donation to support AALDEF. All donations go directly toward AALDEF’s legal and education programs. Please take advantage of this opportunity to root for your team while making a contribution for a good cause!

METS
Mets
vs. Atlanta Braves at Citi Field
Tuesday, August 26, 7:10 pm
Section 512 (above home)
$25 per ticket, plus $5 donation or more

YANKEES
Yankees
vs. Boston Red Sox at Yankee Stadium
Thursday, September 4, 7:05 pm
Section 426 (above third base)
$29 per ticket, plus $11 donation or more

Tickets are limited, so act fast! Please contact Eva Lew at elew@aaldef.org or (212) 966-5932, ext. 208 to reserve your tickets. After your reservation is confirmed, we will accept check and credit card payments. Tickets can either be mailed or held for pick-up at the AALDEF office at 99 Hudson Street in Manhattan. Thank you for supporting AALDEF!

HUD LEGAL HONORS PROGRAM

The brochure and application for HUD’s Office of General Counsel Legal Honors program for 2015 Law School graduates are now available online here

The U.S Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Office of General Counsel (OGC) is now accepting applications for our 2015-2016 Legal Honors Program.  The Legal Honors Program is the hiring vehicle for entry-level attorneys for the Office of General Counsel.  Through this program, OGC recruits the most talented and committed law school graduates interested in playing a vital role in helping HUD accomplish its mission to “create strong, sustainable, inclusive communities and quality, affordable homes for all.”

Legal Honors is the entry level position for attorneys at HUD.  HUD typically hires between 10 and 20 new attorneys each year for its offices in Washington, D.C., and across the United States.  At the completion of the 14-month Legal Honors Program, participants who have gained bar admission typically graduate to attorney positions at the agency.  Additional information regarding the nature of our legal work and office locations can be found in the brochure.  Attorneys at HUD work in a broad range of matters, including program advice, program enforcement, civil rights, litigation, real estate finance and other transactional matters, personnel, labor and procurement.  Information about our programs is available at hud.gov.

The application deadline is September 5, 2014, and that is a firm deadline. 

From St John’s and NYU Law Schools: Title VII at 50 Symposium

St. John's University

Title VII at 50 Symposium

The year 2014 marks the 50th anniversary of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, landmark legislation prohibiting employment discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, and national origin. By its enactment, notions of equality were more deeply embedded in United States public law. 

The Law Schools of St. John’s University and New York University are very proud to present the collaborative effort assessing the past, present and future of Title VII.

This two-day symposium will include the following topics:

  • The historical origins of Title VII and its current effectiveness
  • Reforms or amendments of Title VII in terms of its scope, implementation or interpretation
  • Important cultural, sociological, and societal changes wrought by Title VII

Visit our website for a full list of presenters.

Dates

Friday, April 4, 2014

St. John’s School of Law

10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Belson Moot Court Room
2nd Floor
8000 Utopia Parkway
Queens, NY 11439

Saturday, April 5, 2014

10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

New York University School of Law

Vanderbilt Hall, Room 210
2nd Floor
40 Washington Square South
New York, NY 10012

Hosts
The Ronald H. Brown Center for Civil Rights and Economic Development
St. John’s Center for Labor and Employment Law
St. John’s Center for International and Comparative Law
NYU Center for Labor and Employment Law
St. John’s Law Review
Journal of Civil Rights and Economic Development
St. John’s Journal of International and Comparative Law

Sponsors
American Arbitration Association
Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund
LatinoJustice/PRLDEF
New York Civil Liberties Union (NYCLU)
Society of American Law Teachers (SALT)

Registration for Continuing Legal Education (CLE)
The two-day Symposium qualifies for 9 non-transitional practice area CLE credit hours4 credits on Friday, 5 credits on Saturday. The CLE fee for each day is $150 or $225 for both days.

Payment
Complete and return the Continuing Legal Education form by April 1, 2014.

For credit card payment, e-mail the completed form to mckeevec@stjohns.edu or fax it to 718-990-5998. To pay by mail, send checks payable to St. John’s School of Law with the completed CLE form to:

Office of Continuing Legal Education
St. John’s University School of Law
8000 Utopia Parkway
Queens, NY 11439

Hardship Guidelines
Hardship tuition reduction is available in special circumstances. Please refer to the form.

For more information, please contact: clel@stjohns.edu

PRESS RELEASE: Accepting Applications for Second Circuit’s Pro Bono Panel

UNITED STATES COURT OF APPEALS FOR THE SECOND CIRCUIT

Thurgood Marshall United States Courthouse
40 Centre Street
New York, New York 10007

ROBERT A. KATZMANN
CHIEF JUDGE

CATHERINE O’HAGAN WOLFE SALLY PRITCHARD 
CLERK OF COURT DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF LEGAL AFFAIRS

March 3, 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

The Criminal Justice Act/Pro Bono Committee is accepting applications for the Second Circuit’s Pro Bono Panel. The deadline is Friday, May 2, 2014.

Pro Bono Panel members will, at the Court’s invitation or on an appellant’s motion for appointment of counsel, represent pro se litigants in civil appeals that present issues of first impression, complex issues of law or fact, or raise potentially meritorious claims warranting further briefing and oral argument. Pro bono representation will be provided to litigants who would otherwise be unable to pay for counsel and are ineligible for the appointment of counsel pursuant to the Criminal Justice Act.

Cases in which pro bono counsel will be appointed cover a broad range of legal issues. A significant percentage of the cases are prisoner civil rights appeals; others may involve labor and employment, discrimination, social security, immigration and tax law.

Applicants must be admitted to and members in good standing of the Bar of the Second Circuit, or have an application pending before this Court, and have at least three years of appellate experience. Pro Bono Panel members will serve for a term not to exceed three years.

Pro Bono Panel Members who were appointed by the Court in 2011 for a three-year term must submit a new application if they wish to remain on the Panel. A completed application package contains a resume, a written application (available on the Court’s website at http://www.ca2.uscourts.gov) and three writing samples, preferably appellate briefs on which the applicant was the primary author. These materials must be submitted to Sally Pritchard, Director of Legal Affairs, United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, 40 Foley Square, New York, NY 10007, by Friday, May 2, 2014.