AAARI-CUNY Lecture Series: We Too Sing America

From the Asian American / Asian Research Institute (AAARI) at the City University of New York (CUNY):

Please join us for a talk on, We Too Sing America – Deepa
Iyer in Conversation with Zohra Saed, on Friday, March 18, 2016, from 6pm to
8pm, at 25 West 43rd Street, 10th Floor, Room 1000, between 5th & 6th
Avenues, Manhattan. This talk is free and open to the general public.

Author and nationally renowned activist Deepa Iyer, in
conversation with Brooklyn based Afghan American poet Zohra Saed, will discuss
her book We Too Sing America: South Asian, Arab, Muslim, and Sikh Immigrants
Shape Our Multiracial Future.

Many of us can recall the targeting of South Asian, Arab,
Muslim, and Sikh people in the wake of 9/11. We may be less aware, however, of
the ongoing racism directed against these groups in the past decade and a half.
In We Too Sing America, Deepa Iyer catalogs recent racial flash points, from
the 2012 massacre at the Sikh gurdwara in Oak Creek, Wisconsin, to the violent
opposition to the Islamic Center of Murfreesboro, Tennessee, and to the Park 51
Community Center in Lower Manhattan.

Iyer asks whether hate crimes should be considered domestic
terrorism and explores the role of the state in perpetuating racism through
detentions, national registration programs, police profiling, and constant
surveillance. She looks at topics including Islamophobia in the Bible Belt; the
“Bermuda Triangle” of anti-immigrant, anti-Muslim hysteria; and the
energy of new reform movements, including those of “undocumented and
unafraid” youth and Black Lives Matter.

Deepa Iyer is an activist, writer, and lawyer with a strong
commitment to intersectional, community-based, racial justice issues in the
United States. The former Executive Director of South Asian Americans Leading
Together (SAALT), Deepa is currently the Senior Fellow at the Center for Social
Inclusion where she provides analysis, commentary and scholarship on how to
build equity and solidarity in America’s changing racial landscape.

Zohra Saed is a Brooklyn based Afghan American poet. Her
poetry and essays have been published in numerous anthologies and journals.
Zohra is a doctoral candidate at The City University of New York Graduate
Center. As a Lecturer, she initiated the following courses at Hunter College:
Arab American Literature; West Asian American Literature and Film; and Central
Asian Film and Literature.

To RSVP for this talk, please visit
www.aaari.info/16-03-18Iyer.htm. Please be prepared to present proper
identification when entering the building lobby.

If you are unable to attend the talk, it will be live
webcasted on our website, www.aaari.info,
beginning 6:15PM EST, and also available the following week as streaming
video and audio podcast. See you on Friday!

*Press Release* “New Yorkers for Real Immigration Reform” Denounce President’s Executive Action Delay; Discuss Plans to Respond

(New York, NY) On a telephonic press conference this afternoon, members of “New Yorkers for Real Immigration Reform” (NYRIR), a campaign coordinated by the New York Immigration Coalition denounced President Obama’s delay of executive action on immigration, and discussed plans to respond on behalf of immigrant families and communities in New York. On September 6th, White House officials informed lawmakers and advocates that President Obama will delay executive action on immigration – that may provide bold and broad administrative relief to millions of hardworking immigrants – until after November elections, a decision causing outrage and disappointment among immigrant communities. Saturday’s announcement breaks the pledge made by the President in his June remarks to take action on immigration on his own by the end of the summer “without further delay”.

“Immigrant communities are tired of empty speeches and broken promises from the White House,” said Steven Choi, executive director of the New York Immigration Coalition. “But despite this disappointing delay, we are ready to work harder than ever to protect our communities, starting with a national week of action on September 22nd to show the White House, Democrats and Republicans that we will hold their feet to the fire until action is taken. This November, President Obama will have one last chance to live up to the promises he made, by providing big and broad executive action to halt deportations. He must consider how he wants to define his presidential legacy – will he be the “Deporter-in-Chief,” or the President who takes the historic step to fix our broken immigration system?  Our communities will make clear our views to the President, and to the Democrats and the Republicans, as we mobilize immigrant voters up to and through the November elections.” 

Affected immigrants and leaders from faith, labor, and immigrant advocacy communities throughout New York State expressed their anger at the delay and commitment to continue fighting.  

“When I left Ecuador 20 years ago to come to the US to provide for my family, I left behind an 11 month old son. My son is now 20 years old. I want to see him more than anything in the world but I need to be here working to support them,” said Marta Gualotuna, member of Make the Road NY. “The President should take action to protect people like me who have been here for so long and contributed so much, so we can see our families. This delay angers me and my community, and we will fight to hold the President to his promise.”

“We are deeply disappointed by the Administration’s decision to delay executive action, which means that the lives of hard-working immigrant families continue to hang in the balance. In many communities where our members live and work, the Administration’s decision to delay executive action forces families to continue to live in the shadows, said Hector Figueroa, president of 32 BJ SEIU. "We know that we got to this point because earlier this year the Republicans refused to vote on comprehensive reform. Immigrant voters will be mobilizing in force this November, and we will continue to fight until real immigration reform becomes a reality.”

“Faith in New York works with over 60 congregations throughout New York City representing over 60,000 people of faith, many who are undocumented. As people of Faith we know that it is a moral failure  to play political games with our families,” said Onleilove Alston, interim executive director of Faith in New York, member of the PICO National Network. “The President and the Senate democrats have decided that it’s okay to see several thousand more deportations for a few political gains. This was never about politics for us. It has always been about our families. We hope the nation’s leaders will one day view this issue through the same lens. Our families have been ignored, neglected, and demonized by elected officials for too long. Our sacred text commands that we welcome the stranger yet each day that passes, over 1000 families are separated.“

Gail Golden, co-chair of Rockland Immigration Coalition said, “Rockland County is home to large and growing immigrant communities. Our Spanish speaking community alone has grown 67% since 2000. Immigrants contribute enormously to our economy as workers, business owners and consumers. Many undocumented persons have been the target of cruel and immediate deportations for incidents such as broken taillights, visiting a relative in jail, or having an out of state license. One young mother was deported after being stopped at a traffic light in an old car. Her young children were in school and she was not even given a chance to contact them.  Families are being torn apart; children are being left without parents. We need administrative relief  as soon as possible. Every day that goes by without it damages families and communities.”

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The New Yorkers for Real Immigration Reform campaign is a statewide campaign coordinated by the New York Immigration Coalition and endorsed by 170 labor, business, faith, grassroots and immigrant organizations from across the state. The coalition is calling for an overhaul of the immigration system to meet the needs of the economy and keep families together.

The New York Immigration Coalition is an umbrella policy and advocacy organization for nearly 200 groups in New York State that work with immigrants and refugees. The NYIC aims to achieve a fairer and more just society that values the contributions of immigrants and extends opportunity to all by promoting immigrants’ full civic participation, fostering their leadership, and providing a unified voice and a vehicle for collective action for New York’s diverse immigrant communities.

Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund Fall 2014 Internships For Undergraduate, Graduate, and Law Students

The Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund (AALDEF), founded in 1974, is the first organization on the East Coast to protect and promote the legal rights of Asian Americans through litigation, legal advocacy, and community education.  For more information about AALDEF, please visit our website at www.aaldef.org.

Fall internships are available for the following program areas (open to all unless otherwise noted):

Immigrant Access to Justice, litigation, legal services, and organizing/outreach with communities impacted by post 9/11 immigration and law enforcement policies. An additional emphasis on Asian communities’ access to representation and education about immigration policies and practices that may impact them, including deferred action policies and administrative relief for youth and other immigrants, unconstitutional DHS stops, and collaboration between state/local law enforcement and federal immigration enforcement, e.g., “Secure Communities” program. **Law students ONLY**

Voting Rights, legal research and fact development under the Voting Rights Act and Equal Protection Clause challenging anti-Asian voter discrimination, advocacy on bilingual ballots, and state and local election reform; produce reports and organize public forums; work with volunteer attorneys and assist in organizing legal trainings. Voting Rights Interns work on the following:

  • Election monitoring to ensure that Asian Americans are treated fairly at the polls and to document violations of the Voting Rights Act and the federal Constitution.  The Voting Rights Act mandates the availability of Chinese, Korean, and Bengali language assistance and forbids anti-Asian voter discrimination.
  • Work with pro bono lawyers at corporate law firms and volunteer law students to inspect poll sites for compliance with the Voting Rights Act and the Help America Vote Act.  
  • Coordinate a survey of Asian American voters to document the use of bilingual ballots and report on Asian American voting patterns.  The survey will be taken at several poll sites across the nation.  Interns will recruit, train, and supervise volunteers, as well as coordinate logistics at three dozen polling locations.
  • Register new voters after citizenship swearing-in ceremonies.
  • Conduct research and advocacy on local, state, and federal election reform proposals.

Administrative Assistant, provide administrative support in preparation for AALDEF’s annual gala, including: researching for prospective dinner sponsors and silent auction donors.  Computer experience with databases, graphics and web programs are helpful. **Undergraduate students ONLY.  Workstudy grants accepted.**

Description of Internships:
Interns are supervised by attorneys and/or AALDEF staff in specific program areas.  These internships are not paid positions, but academic credit may be arranged.  Interns work anywhere between 8 to 25 hours per week.  The internship usually commences with the start of classes and ends in early December.

To Apply:
Any bilingual ability should be stated in the resume.  Bilingual ability is helpful but not required.  Applications should also state the number of hours the intern is able to work per week and which program area(s) you are interested in.  Email applications are accepted.  Applications reviewed on a rolling basis.  Send a resume and cover letter (law students should include a writing sample) to:

AALDEF Fall Intern Search
Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund (AALDEF)
99 Hudson Street, 12th floor, New York, New York 10013-2815
Fax: 212-966-4303 or Email: info@aaldef.org

For more information, contact Jennifer Weng at 212-966-5932, ext. 212 or jweng@aaldef.org.

From MinKwon: Immigrants’ Day of Action

Immigrants’ Day of Action

Join MinKwon and New Yorkers for Real Immigration Reform to raise the voice of immigrants in New York City!

Date & Time: April 10, 12 p.m.
Place: Foley Square

On April 10th, we will stand united to call on lawmakers to enact policies that advance immigrant rights and services! We will start off the day with the New York Immigration Coalition and participate in legislative meetings with City Council Members to push City legislative and budget priorities. Then we will join New Yorkers for Real Immigration Reform for a rally at Foley Square to demand Congress pass federal legislation to fix our broken immigration system. Join us to call for a just and fair America for all!
 
Mark your calendars!  RSVP with Jorim Rhee at jorim.rhee@minkwon.org or 718-460-5600.

From NYIC: IMMIGRANTS’ DAY OF ACTION

                                   

*SAVE THE DATE*

IMMIGRANTS’ DAY OF ACTION 

THURSDAY, APRIL 10, 2014

April 10th is an historic day for our movement.  This year, we will be joining groups around the country for a nationwide mobilization demonstrating the power of our movement and calling on lawmakers at the city, state and federal level to enact policies that promote immigrant rights.  Please join the New York Immigration Coalition and New Yorkers for Real Immigration Reform together with our allies across New York City for a rally to demand fairness and equality for immigrants in New York and across the country.

We hope you can also join the New York Immigration Coalition in the morning for legislative meetings with our City Council and our new Mayoral Administration to push the NYIC’s City Policy & Budget Priorities, which, if enacted, would strengthen New York City as a national leader on immigrant rights. 

Join us and help raise the voice of immigrants in New York City!

To RSVP click here

From NYIC: Annual Immigrants’ Day of Action in Albany

Save the Date

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Annual Immigrants’ Day of Action in Albany

Wednesday, March 5th, 2014

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There is too much at stake for us not to stand united!

Pass the New York State DREAM Act
Provide access to driver’s licenses for all New Yorkers
Increase funding for immigrant services across New York State

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To RSVP for the Immigrants’ Day of Action in Albany,

email Juan Ramirez at jramirez@thenyic.org for more information.

To support this exciting event with a donation, please click here.

AAARI: Talk on A Comparative Look at Chinese and Dominican Americans

Join us for a talk on Growing Up in Transnational Worlds: A Comparative Look at Chinese and Dominican Americans, by Vivian Louie, on Friday, December 13, 2013, from 6pm to 8pm, at 25 West 43rd Street, 10th Floor, Room 1000, between 5th & 6th Avenues, Manhattan. This talk is free and open to the general public.

Transnationalism refers to the phenomenon of immigrants maintaining connections to their country of origin, and employing a dual frame of reference to evaluate their experiences and outcomes in the country in which they have settled. How does transnationalism matter in the identities among the second generation, e.g., individuals who were born in the United States, or migrated by late childhood? In this presentation, Dr. Vivian Louie examines this question among second generation Dominicans and Chinese who have grown up in strong transnational fields and had parents who want them to participate in the homeland imaginary. The focus is on transnational orientations and/or practices among second generation individuals with particular attention to generational status, class, ethnicity, gender, and race.
 

Vivian Louie is the 2013-2014 CUNY Thomas Tam Visiting Professor at Hunter College. Dr. Louie received her Ph.D and M.A. from the Yale University Department of Sociology, M.A. from the Stanford University Department of Communication, and A.B. from Harvard University. She  has previously worked as a newspaper journalist, journalism teacher and youth magazine editor, and an associate professor in education and lecturer in sociology at Harvard. 

Dr. Louie studies immigration, education, and identities with a focus on the contrast between lived experience in urban and suburban neighborhoods. Dr.  Louie’s two books, Compelled to Excel: Immigration, Education, and Opportunity Among Chinese Americans(Stanford University Press, 2004) and Keeping the Immigrant Bargain: The Costs and Rewards of Success in America (Russell Sage Foundation, 2012), reveal how academic success is achieved in similar ways among working class Chinese, Dominicans and Colombians, even though they belong to groups typically framed at opposite ends of academic success (the Asian American high achiever and the Latino American low achiever). Dr. Louie is also an editor of and contributor to Writing Immigration: Scholars and Journalists in Dialogue (University of California Press, 2011).

To RSVP for this talk, please visit www.aaari.info/13-12-13Louie.htm. Please be prepared to present proper identification when entering the building lobby. Can’t attend? Watch the live webcast on our website homepage, starting at 6:15PM EST, or access the streaming video and audio podcast the following week.