NAPABA Congratulates Julie Su on Labor Deputy Secretary Nomination

For Immediate Release: Date: February 10, 2021

Contact: Priya Purandare, Executive Director

WASHINGTON – 
The National Asian Pacific American Bar Association (NAPABA) congratulates NAPABA Trailblazer, California Labor Secretary Julie Su, on her nomination to be Deputy Secretary of Labor in the Biden-Harris administration.

“California Labor Secretary Julie Su currently oversees the largest state labor department in the country and is an exceptionally well-qualified candidate to serve as Deputy Secretary of Labor,” said A. B. Cruz III, president of NAPABA. “Julie is a nationally recognized expert on workers’ rights and civil rights and has spent a large portion of her career advocating for the immigrant community. 2020 has been a difficult year for most Americans, but even in the face of a pandemic and severe economic decline, as California Labor Secretary, Julie led the state through decisive actions and creative solutions to rescue California businesses. With a state economy of over $3.2 trillion that spans diverse industries, NAPABA is confident that her leadership will steer our country toward recovery and opportunity. Our strong support of her underscores the importance of having public servants who are representative of the American people: whether it’s race, gender or socioeconomic status.”

Prior to her role as California Labor Secretary, Su was California Labor Commissioner, Litigation Director at Asian Americans Advancing Justice – Los Angeles and has taught at UCLA Law School and Northeastern Law School. Su was a recipient of the 2019 American Bar Association Margaret Brent Award and a recipient of the MacArthur Foundation’s “Genius” Grant. She is a graduate from Harvard Law School and Stanford University.

NAPABA advocated for and strongly supported Julie Su’s nomination. We thank President Biden for nominating Julie Su to Deputy Secretary of Labor.

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The National Asian Pacific American Bar Association (NAPABA) represents the interests of approximately 50,000 legal professionals and nearly 90 national, state, and local Asian Pacific American bar associations. NAPABA is a leader in addressing civil rights issues confronting Asian Pacific American communities. Through its national network, NAPABA provides a strong voice for increased diversity in government and the judiciary on the local, state, and federal levels, advocates for equal opportunity in the workplace, works to eliminate hate crimes and anti-immigrant sentiment, and promotes the professional development of people of color in the legal profession.

NAPABA ANNOUNCES 2014 DANIEL K. INOUYE TRAILBLAZER AWARD RECIPIENTS

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
August 14, 2014

Contact: Tina Matsuoka
(202) 775-9555

WASHINGTON – The National Asian Pacific American Bar Association (NAPABA) has selected five exceptional attorneys to receive NAPABA’s highest honor, the Daniel K. Inouye Trailblazer Award. This award recognizes the outstanding achievements, commitment, and leadership of lawyers who have paved the way for the advancement of other Asian Pacific American attorneys. Trailblazers have demonstrated vision, courage, and tenacity, and made substantial and lasting contributions to the Asian Pacific American legal profession, as well as to the broader Asian Pacific American community. The 2014 Daniel K. Inouye Trailblazers Awards will be presented on November 9, 2014, at a special ceremony during the 2014 NAPABA Annual Convention in Scottsdale, Arizona, to the following recipients:

  • Emilia “Mimi” R. Castillo, Castillo Mediation and Arbitration Services
  • The Honorable Lance A. Ito, Superior Court of California, Los Angeles Country
  • Julie A. Su, Labor Commissioner, State of California
  • Bruce I. Yamashita, Partner, Law Office of Bruce I. Yamashita, PLLC
  • Marian M. Yim, Shareholder, Wong Fujii Carter, PC

This year’s Trailblazer Award recipients are a diverse and impressive group. Ms. Castillo has had a successful legal career including over 25 years over as a solo practitioner and participated in the founding of NAPABA, as well as several other local and national Asian Pacific American bar associations. During Judge Ito’s long career in public service, he has presided over a number of high profile cases, including the O.J. Simpson trial, while making time to train other judges about the importance of foreign language interpreters and to mentor Asian Pacific American judicial candidates. Ms. Su successfully advocated for the rights of poor and disenfranchised workers, consumers, students, and, in particular, the Asian Pacific American immigrant community, before becoming the first Asian Pacific American Labor Commissioner for the state of California. Mr. Yamashita fought back against the anti-Asian bias he faced in the U.S. Marine Corps Officer Candidate School and changed the way the military handles allegations of racial discrimination. Before becoming a shareholder in Arizona’s first Asian majority owned law firm, Ms. Yim served as an Arizona Assistant Attorney General, Counsel to the Mayor of Phoenix, and founding president of the Arizona Asian American Bar Association.

NAPABA congratulates the 2014 Daniel K. Inouye Trailblazer Award recipients and thanks them for paving the way for Asian Pacific American attorneys.

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The National Asian Pacific American Bar Association (NAPABA) is the national association of Asian Pacific American (APA) attorneys, judges, law professors, and law students. NAPABA represents the interests of over 40,000 attorneys and approximately 70 national, state, and local bar associations. Its members include solo practitioners, large firm lawyers, corporate counsel, legal services and non-profit attorneys, and lawyers serving at all levels of government. NAPABA engages in legislative and policy advocacy, promotes APA political leadership and political appointments, and builds coalitions within the legal profession and the community at large. NAPABA also serves as a resource for government agencies, members of Congress, and public service organizations about APAs in the legal profession, civil rights, and diversity in the courts.