Press Release: NAPABA Celebrates the Confirmation of Patrick Bumatay to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit

For Immediate Release December 10, 2019

WASHINGTON – Today, Patrick J. Bumatay was confirmed to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.

“NAPABA congratulates Patrick Bumatay on his historic confirmation to serve on the U.S. Courts of Appeals for the Ninth Circuits,” said NAPABA President Bonnie Lee Wolf. “Judge Bumatay is the first Filipino American to serve as a federal appellate judge and the first openly gay judge on the Ninth Circuit. We are proud to have supported Judge Bumatay’s nomination.”

Patrick J. Bumatay is an Assistant United States Attorney in the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of California. He currently serves in the Office’s Appellate Section, representing the United States before the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. Bumatay has held numerous positions in public service throughout the Department of Justice, including the top three leadership offices. He clerked for Judge Timothy M. Tymkovich of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit and Judge Sandra L. Townes of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of New York. He is a graduate of Yale University and Harvard Law School. He is an active member of NAPABA, our affiliated bar—the National Filipino American Lawyers Association, and the Tom Homann LGBT Law Association.

NAPABA thanks President Trump for nominating Patrick Bumatay to the bench.

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The National Asian Pacific American Bar Association (NAPABA) is the national association of Asian Pacific American (APA) attorneys, judges, law professors, and law students. NAPABA represents the interests of over 50,000 attorneys and over 80 national, state, and local bar associations. Its members include solo practitioners, large firm lawyers, corporate counsel, legal services and non-profit attorneys, and lawyers serving at all levels of government. NAPABA engages in legislative and policy advocacy, promotes APA political leadership and political appointments, and builds coalitions within the legal profession and the community at large. NAPABA also serves as a resource for government agencies, members of Congress, and public service organizations about APAs in the legal profession, civil rights, and diversity in the courts.

NAPABA | 1612 K St. NW, Suite 510 | Washington, DC 20006 | www.napaba.org

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Coming Together: A LGBTQ Allyship Panel Workshop

Please join Project by Project (PbP), and their 2016 partner, National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance (NQAPIA) as they present “Coming Together: A LGBTQ Allyship Panel Workshop.” This workshop is aimed for the general public to generate awareness of the underlying issues of the AAPI LGBTQ community and how we can be better allies. Our panelists will provide a wide range of perspectives, situations and environments and ways allies can support the AAPI LGBTQ community. Topics include: a corporate perspective, a Family Acceptance Campaign called Family is Still Family, struggles of coming out and the need for allies, and other LGBTQ AAPI issues like immigration and racial justice after-Orlando.

Panelists:
Shamina Singh, President at MasterCard Center for Inclusive Growth
Andy Marra, Communications Manager at the Arcus Foundation
Glenn Magpantay, Executive Director of National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance (NQAPIA)
Clara Yoon, Founder of API Rainbow Parent of PFLAG-NYC

Schedule:

6:30pm-7pm | Welcome and Registration

7pm-8:15pm | Panel workshop discussion

8:15pm-8:30pm | Audience Q&A

8:30pm-9pm | Refreshments and Networking

This year, National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance (NQAPIA) and Project By Project (PbP) are partnering to develop both organizations by leveraging their combined experiences, knowledge and skills. NQAPIA is dedicated toward building a world where all Asian Americans, South Asians, Southeast Asians, Pacific Islanders are fully accepted in their homes, families, places of work, places of worship and community regardless of their sexual orientation or gender-identity. PbP is an organization of professionals from a range of industries that uses its members to develop innovative solutions and apply them to serve non-profits in our local communities. Furthermore, training its members to be leaders within the AAPI community.

Light refreshments will be provided.

RSVP on EventBrite is required. Seats are limited.

This workshop is free to the public but a suggested donation of $5 or more is appreciated. Please make your donation at: http://projectbyproject.org/donation-2/

Thank you for your support!

WHEN: Tuesday, July 19, 2016 from 6:30 PM to 9:00 PM (EDT) –

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WHERE: Asian American / Asian Research Institute (AAARI) – 25 West 43rd Street, #1000, New York, NY 10036 –

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Special Shout-out from AABANY to its LGBT Committee Chair Glenn Magpantay. He is one of the panelists at the event.

AABANY Stands with Victims of Orlando Shooting

The Asian American Bar Association of New York is deeply saddened by the horrific massacre that occurred on June 12, 2016 in Orlando, Florida. We are grieved and mourn with the victims, their families, the LGBT community, and the city of Orlando. We stand in solidarity in this difficult time to take real steps toward making this country a place where all Americans feel secure, safe, and able to be fully authentic to who they are no matter their race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, or religion.

The Bamboo Closet: To Stay In Or Not?

The Bamboo Closet: To Stay In Or Not?

Glenn Magpantay, Executive Director of the National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance (NQAPIA) and the Chair of AABANY’s LGBT Committee, answered some important questions on the intersectionality of being both queer and a minority on NBC’s Comcast Newsmakers on August 3, 2015. It’s an exciting time in history for LGBT rights, but as Glenn so poignantly put it, “Yes, we can get married, but who’s going to come to the wedding?”

It often feels for an Asian American individuals that they can be neither accepted in the LGBT community as ethnic minorities nor the Asian community due to their sexuality or gender identities. Glenn speaks of NQAPIA’s work to develop resources and role models of Asian American families that are fully supportive of their LGBT children. NQAPIA works with community leaders, actors, and real families to try to spread the message of love and acceptance, as difficult as it may seem. As Glenn puts it, “Asian Americans are that often-overlooked minority… All the LGBT leaders are white. All the Asians are straight. Where do I belong?” In their efforts to answer that question and bring inclusion to both the LGBT community and the Asian community, NQAPIA offers messages in over twenty different languages. To learn more, visit their website

For more thoughts on how we can diversify the LGBT movement, watch Glenn’s thoughts above.

NAPABA CELEBRATES LGBT PRIDE MONTH

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 4, 2014

WASHINGTON — The National Asian Pacific American Bar Association (NAPABA) is proud to join the National Queer Asian Pacific American Alliance (NQAPIA) in celebrating the month of June as Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender (LGBT) Pride Month. In recognition of LGBT Pride Month, this month the NAPABA logo will proudly display the colors of the rainbow flag that is often flown as a symbol of LGBT pride.

“This month, we celebrate our family and friends in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender communities,” said William J. Simonistch, president of NAPABA. “NAPABA has long recognized the contributions and struggles of the LGBT community. And as we recognize LGBT Pride Month, we are reminded once again of the need to commit ourselves to fight for the equal civil liberties of all.”

LGBT equality has long been a priority for NAPABA. Most recently, The Hill published an op-ed by NAPABA’s President opposing Arizona Senate Bill 1062, which would have given businesses the right to discriminate under the guise of religion, including discrimination based on sexual orientation. NAPABA also sent a letter to Arizona Governor Jane Brewer urging her to veto the bill, noting that if she did not do so, NAPABA would have to seriously consider relocating its 26th Annual Convention from Scottsdale.

NAPABA has for many years supported marriage equality, and has joined amicus briefs in support of marriage equality in federal and state courts throughout the nation, including amicus briefs in the U.S. Supreme Court in Hollingsworth v. Perry and Windsor v. United States in 2013.

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The National Asian Pacific American Bar Association (NAPABA) is the national association of Asian Pacific American attorneys, judges, law professors, and law students. NAPABA represents the interests of over 40,000 attorneys and 68 state and local Asian Pacific American bar associations. Its members include solo practitioners, large firm lawyers, corporate counsel, legal service and non-profit attorneys, and lawyers serving at all levels of government. NAPABA continues to be a leader in addressing civil rights issues confronting Asian Pacific American communities. Through its national network of committees and affiliates, NAPABA provides a strong voice for increased diversity of the federal and state judiciaries, advocates for equal opportunity in the workplace, works to eliminate hate crimes and anti-immigrant sentiment, and promotes the professional development of people of color in the legal profession.

Press Release from the Hispanic National Bar Association: Pulling Participation in the 2015 Annual Convention

Contact: Alba Cruz-Hacker, HNBA Executive Director
acruzhacker@hnba.com

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

The Hispanic National Bar Association Pulls its 2015 Annual Convention From Phoenix in Response to Arizona’s SB 1062

February 26, 2014

Washington, D.C. – The HNBA announced today that it has pulled its 40th Annual Convention previously scheduled for Phoenix, Arizona in September 2015.

On Monday, February 24th, the HNBA denounced the Arizona legislature’s passage of SB 1062. The HNBA also called for Governor Jan Brewer to veto the legislation and still hopes that she will do so. As set forth in its February 24th press release, SB 1062 discriminates against members of Arizona’s lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community.

The proposed legislation also impacts other citizens that are either traveling through Arizona or that are doing business or have business interests in the state. Accordingly, the HNBA’s Board of Governors voted unanimously to immediately pull the Annual Convention.

“The HNBA views this as a civil rights issue. As a national association of lawyers committed to promoting the ideals of equal protection, equal opportunity, tolerance, and inclusiveness, it is imperative that we speak up and take immediate action in the presence of injustice,” stated HNBA National President Miguel Alexander Pozo. As the late Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. said more than 50 years ago, writing from a Birmingham, AL jail cell, “injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.“

As lawyers, we have sworn to uphold the United States Constitution as well as the laws of our respective states. “In our view, SB 1062 violates the Equal Protection and the Commerce Clauses of the U.S. Constitution, and offends the anti-discrimination protections found in Title II of the Civil Rights Act of 1964,” said Mr. Pozo.

While the HNBA will remain steadfast, and stand in solidarity with our Affiliate Los Abogados and our HNBA members in Arizona, by taking this action we are sending a clear message to Arizona lawmakers. “Laws that return us to a darker time in the nation’s history simply cannot be tolerated. SB 1062 and SB 1070 are two such laws,” said Mr. Pozo. 

About the Hispanic National Bar Association

The Hispanic National Bar Association (HNBA) is an incorporated, not-for-profit, national membership association that represents the interests of Hispanic attorneys, judges, law professors, legal assistants, law students, and legal professionals in the United States and its territories. Since 1972, the HNBA has acted as a force for positive change within the legal profession by creating opportunities for Hispanic lawyers and by helping generations of lawyers to succeed. The HNBA has also effectively advocated on issues of importance to the national Hispanic community. While we are proud of our accomplishments, we are mindful that our mission is as vital today as it was four decades ago, especially as the U.S. Hispanic population continues to grow.

For more information, please visit http://www.hnba.com.