NYC Family Justice Center, Manhattan (MFJC) Advanced Training Offerings: April/May 2018

NYC Family Justice Center, Manhattan (MFJC) Advanced Training Offerings: April/May 2018

Upcoming Manhattan Family Justice Center Core Trainings

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Save the Dates and Register Now!

Upcoming Manhattan Family Justice Center Core Trainings

The NYC Family Justice Center in Manhattan is happy to announce our next round of core trainings. Our core training program provides professional development on the most relevant topics for service providers working with victims and survivors of intimate partner violence, sex trafficking, and elder abuse.

Ø  Criminal Justice

Monday, June 23rd 9 am – 12 pm

Facilitated by Manhattan District Attorney’s Office & NYPD

Ø  Immigration Law: Options and Remedies

Monday, June 23rd 1-4 pm

Facilitated by Her Justice

Ø  Risk Assessment & Safety Planning

Tuesday, June 24th 9 am – 12 pm

Facilitated by MFJC Staff

Ø  Shelter & Housing

Tuesday, June 24th 1-4 pm

Facilitated by New Destiny Housing & MFJC Staff

Ø  Family & Matrimonial Law

Wednesday, June 25th 1-4 pm

Facilitated by NY Legal Assistance Group

Ø  Domestic Violence Dialogue

Thursday, June 26nd 11 am – 1 pm

Facilitated by Urban Justice Project

Ø  Self-Sufficiency & Economic Empowerment

Friday, June 27th 10 am – 1 pm

Facilitated by MFJC Staff

Ø  Culture Conversations: LGBTQ Communities

Tuesday, July 29th 1-4 pm

Facilitated by NYC Anti-Violence Project and NY Legal Assistance Group

All trainings will be held in the MFJC Training Room at 80 Centre Street (cross street Worth St.), 5th Floor, New York, NY 10013. More training details will follow soon.

From the Mayor’s Office to Combat Domestic Violence: Upcoming Manhattan Family Justice Center Trainings

Upcoming Manhattan Family Justice Center Trainings:

Register Now!

Ø  Spotting Consumer Debt Issues and Referring Survivors to Available Resources for Help

Friday, April 25th 3-5 pm

Facilitated by Feerick Center for Social Justice, Fordham Law School

  • Overview of consumer debt crisis in New York City
  • Impact of consumer debt on survivors
  • Importance of building financial self-sufficiency
  • Safety implications of credit reporting and consumer debt advocacy
  • Screening for consumer credit and consumer debt issues
  • Overview of consumer debt resources for domestic violence survivors

Ø  How to File Family Offense Petitions Online

Monday, April 28th 12-1 pm

Tuesday, April 29th 12-1 pm

Facilitated by Urban Justice Center and Safe Horizon

  • How advocates can become an approved group to have access to the Family Offense Petition program
  • How to use the system most effectively to help your clients
  • Legal underpinnings, language, and logistics of petitions, including how to prep client
  • Types of relief, when to file a petition, what to include in the petition

Ø  Elder Abuse: What You Need to Know

Wednesday, April 30th 1-4 pm

Facilitated by Manhattan District Attorney’s Office, JASA, and Weinberg Center for Elder Abuse Prevention

Featuring NYC Department for the Aging, HRA Adult Protective Services, NYC Elder Abuse Center, Council of Senior Centers & Services, Carter Burden Center for the Aging, and Brookdale Center for Healthy Aging

  • How to support healthy aging within the context of family violence
  • The unique features of elder abuse and how it differs from working with younger victims
  • Criminal and civil remedies and the role of the District Attorney’s office in elder abuse cases
  • Valuable elder abuse community resources and the types of assistance they provide

Ø  Expert Dialogue on Trafficking: Improving the Identification and Support of Victims

Friday, May 2nd 1-4 pm

Facilitated by GEMS, Department of Homeland Security, Manhattan District Attorney’s Office, Restore, Sanctuary for Families

  • How to identify human and sex trafficking: defining the law and crime, indicators, dispelling myths
  • An overview of services and remedies
  • Intersections of trafficking, domestic violence and abuse
  • Client-centered and trauma-informed approaches, survivor engagement and leadership
  • Recommendations for improved interdisciplinary collaboration and service delivery

All trainings will be held in the MFJC Training Room at 80 Centre Street, 5th Floor, New York, NY 10013. When you arrive in the lobby, say you are here for the Family Justice Center training. Turn left once you step off the elevators.

Save the Dates! Upcoming Manhattan Family Justice Center Trainings

  • Consumer Credit and Debt Issues for IPV Survivors
          Friday, April 25th 3-5 pm
 
  • How to File Family Offense Petitions Online
          Monday, April 28th 12-1 pm
          Tuesday, April 29th 12-1 pm
 
  • Elder Abuse: What You Need to Know
          Wednesday, April 30th 1-4pm
 
  • Improving the Identification and Support of Sex Trafficking Victims
          Friday, May 2nd 1-4 pm
 
All trainings will be held in the MFJC Training Room at 80 Centre Street 5th Floor, New York, NY 10013. 

Questions? Contact Sarah Flatto.

Sarah Flatto
Director, Programs & Outreach
NYC Family Justice Center, Manhattan
80 Centre St. 5th Floor New York, NY 10013
Mayor’s Office to Combat Domestic Violence
(212) 602-2857 | (212) 602-2800
sarahf@fjcnyc.org | www.nyc.gov/domesticviolence

From the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs: Host a Community Conversation on Immigration

Receive $200 for hosting a conversation

Community-based groups and organizations are eligible to receive a $200 stipend from the Council for hosting a Community Conversation by registering to be a featured site. Featured sites must register their event in advance and complete a final evaluation, including attendance information. Facilitators at featured sites are required to attend a free 60-minute facilitator-training webinar.  Training webinars will be offered at the following throughout the summer and fall; see the Council’s webinars page to learn more and sign up.  

For more information about hosting a Community Conversation, contact Senior Program Officer Erika Halstead (ehalstead@nyhumanities.org / 212.233.1131).

New Community Conversations Toolkits on Immigration

From New Netherland to New York, immigrants from every part of the world have made their home in our state. Community Conversations invites New Yorkers to explore our shared history as immigrants and the descendants of immigrants, and to discuss the ways that immigration continues to shape the experience of being American today. Each conversation uses a short text as a starting point for discussions about cultural understanding and our roles as active citizens in a diverse and democratic society.  

There are community conversation toolkits for children, young adults, and adults. All of the toolkits contain everything you need to host these “do-it-yourself” discussions, including: texts suitable for each audience; a set of sample questions; guidelines for starting and sustaining good conversations; tips for hosting a conversation; and a sample participant evaluation. Anyone can register and download the toolkits for free from our website.

Hurricane Relief – New Employment & Grant Opportunities

Dear Friends and Colleagues,

I hope all is well. We have additional updates and opportunities for you about the city’s ongoing hurricane relief and recovery efforts.

1) MOIA’s Resource Guide

We have compiled a comprehensive and up-to-date resource guide, which provides detailed information on overnight shelters, warming centers, food distribution sites, disaster assistance application info, and important contact numbers. The most updated version is attached to this e-mail. Read here. Also, please check www.nyc.gov or call 311 for the most updated information.

2) Hurricane Clean-Up Employment Opportunities

The United States Department of Labor awarded the New York State Department of Labor grant funds to hire workers to assist in the cleanup of Hurricane Sandy. The grant will be used to help clean up impacted communities in Bronx, Kings, New York, Richmond, Queens, Nassau, Suffolk, Rockland and Westchester counties. You must be unemployed prior to or as a direct result of Hurricane Sandy.

Apply here: https://labor.ny.gov/secure/neg/2012-hurricane-sandy-form.asp

3) Hurricane Relief Grants

In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, small volunteer-led groups responded quickly to meet the needs of local residents. Does your neighborhood of school group need immediate emergency funding? Citizens Committee of NYC is awarding grants to volunteer-led groups providing relief to areas hit especially hard by Hurricane Sandy. Grants of up to $5,000, Immediate notification upon application submission. Please apply here: http://www.citizensnyc.org/programs/grants/hurricane_relief_grants.html  

4) FEMA Mobile Application Registration Sites

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), in partnership with the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs (MOIA), is launching mobile Application Registration Sites across New York City. FEMA will be sending trained staff out to sites for 1-2 days to guide community members through the FEMA disaster assistance application process. Disaster assistance is financial or direct assistance to individuals and families whose property has been damaged or destroyed as a result of a federally-declared disaster, and whose losses are not covered by insurance. It is meant to help with critical expenses that cannot be covered in other ways. We are seeking community-based organizations and houses of worship to host FEMA’s mobile Application Registration Sites. Please let me know if you would like to host FEMA!

5) NYC Restoration Centers

NYC Restore helps New Yorkers in the areas most affected by Hurricane Sandy get access to important information and services to help them recover. For more information, visit: http://www.nyc.gov/html/misc/html/2012/dasc.html. NYC Restoration Centers provide the following types of assistance:

  • NYC Rapid Repairs
  • Food and Nutrition Assistance
  • Temporary Housing Information
  • Health and Medical Benefits
  • Business Restoration
  • Counseling Services
  • Financial Assistance
  • Personal Records and Information

6) Volunteering/Donating

Please see www.nyc.gov/service for current opportunities:

Volunteer on an ongoing basis with New York Cares, Red Hook Initiative, NYC Coalition Against Hunger, UJA Federation, OEM, P.S. 84, St. Virgilius Church, American Legion Hall, etc. in impacted areas.

Ongoing Parks & Recreation clean ups: http://www.nycservice.org/press/view/post/142

Donate food to City Harvest, Food Bank NYC, and Met Council.

Donate materials to Salvation Army, Housing Works, and Catholic Charities.

Donate cash to www.nyc.gov/fund. 100% of donations will go to relief efforts.

If you have any more questions don’t hesitate to contact me!

Best,
Sarah

Sarah Flatto | Project Manager, One NYC One Nation | NYC Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs
(212-341-9075 | (646-912-2496 |*sflatto@cityhall.nyc.gov | nyc.gov/immigrants

Important Information – Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals

From NYC Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs:

Dear Friends and Colleagues,

I’m sure you’ve heard about President Obama’s new program for undocumented youth, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. The following message and attached documents outline vital information about this new initiative.

Consideration of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals is a new federal immigration process that allows certain undocumented young people to request temporary deportation relief and work authorization from the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). The City estimates that 50,000 to 60,000 New Yorkers may be able to request deferred action.

In order to show that they meet the criteria, Deferred Action applicants will need to submit verifiable documentation to the federal government with their applications. They may be able to get some of the documents they need from City agencies. Attached is a one-page flyer that highlights the types of documents the City can provide to individuals who have records on file, along with instructions on how to access those documents. I have also attached flyers in English and Spanish created by USCIS to show the eligibility criteria and application process.

Please note: unlike the DREAM Act, Deferred Action is not legal status, and it does not provide a pathway to obtaining a green card or citizenship. For more information about Deferred Action, including where to find free legal assistance and how to avoid and report immigration scams, please call 311 or visit NYC.gov.

All the best,

Sarah

Sarah Flatto | One NYC One Nation Coordinator | NYC Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs 

212-341-9075 | 646-409-3116 |nyc.gov/immigrants | *sflatto@cityhall.nyc.gov