AABANY Presents: Resume Review Workshop at NYU Law School

On October 16, AABANY’s Student Outreach Committee presented a resume review workshop at New York University School of Law. Practicing attorneys from various fields attended the event to review the resumes of 30 students from NYU’s APALSA group and provide the students with useful substantive feedback on their resumes. The attorneys also offered 1-on-1 advice about networking, job hunting, how to succeed in the legal profession, and answered questions about their respective practice areas.  

Thanks to all the NYU APALSA members who attended. A special thanks to all of the attorneys including Christopher Bae, Ming Cheung, Eunkyong Choi, William Hao, Jonathan Li, Daniel Ng, Aakruti Vakharia, Sahng-Ah Yoo, and Alice Zhang who took time out of their busy schedules to attend the event and be a resource for the students. We look forward to seeing NYU APALSA members taking part in upcoming AABANY events.

AABANY Presents Corporate Law Program at NYU Stern Business & Law Association

On Thursday, Oct. 10, AABANY collaborated with the NYU Stern Business and Law Association (SBLA) to present a program on corporate law. The lunchtime program took place in Tisch Hall at the NYU Stern School of Business. The panelists included Michael Ye, an associate at Wachtell Lipton Rosen & Katz, and Vincent Jian Wu, international lawyer at Kobre & Kim. Michael spoke about the practice of corporate law from a transactional perspective, while Jian described it from the litigation and dispute resolution perspective. Both are AABANY members and Jian is co-chair of AABANY’s Asia Practice Committee. In attendance were undergraduates from NYU who are interested in learning more about the legal world and possibly pursuing law school or the legal profession as a career path. Those in attendance found the discussion engaging and the speakers impressive.

Thanks to former AABANY intern Jason Cheung for spearheading the outreach to NYU Stern, and thanks to Alex Chiang, Director of External Events, SBLA, and SBLA Co-Presidents, Gloria Zheng and Maurice Elbaz, for inviting us. We hope this event is the first of many as AABANY extends its outreach to students beyond law schools. (Thanks to Jason for the photos.)

Volunteer with Empire Mock Trial: January 24-26

Earn 3 free CLE credits while educating top collegiate mock trial competitors! 
 
The nonprofit Empire Mock Trial, in conjunction with NYU Mock trial, is pleased to invite you to our ninth annual Downtown Invitational mock trial tournament on January 24-26 at the EDNY (225 Cadman Plaza East, Brooklyn. Each year the Downtown brings together sixteen of the top collegiate trial advocacy teams. This year’s field includes Harvard, Columbia, NYU, UVA, 2014 national runner-up Princeton, and the 2014 defending national champion, UCLA. 

You can help teach talented, motivated college students about the law by volunteering just a few hours of your time. In exchange, we’ll provide you with free non-transitional CLE credits in the category of skills. 

 
  • Features four preliminary rounds of competition, and you can judge as many or as few as you like—no litigation experience is required
  • Please free to invite a friend or colleague to co-judge with you at the tournament.  We’ll pair you together!
  • 16top trial advocacy teams will compete including Harvard, Columbia, NYU, UVA, and defending national champion UCLA
  • We’ll serve complimentary food and beverages as a token of our appreciation
  • Registering takes less than a minute – just visit our site
We’d be happy to answer any questions you may have.  Feel free to call (917-426-EMTA) or e-mail admin@empiremocktrial.org.
 
We look forward to seeing you in January. 

“Uncovering Talent: The Case of Asian Americans” – Lecture by Chief Justice Earl Warren Professor of Constitutional Law Kenji Yoshino

At the 14th Annual Korematsu Lecture Series, presented by the NYU Asian-Pacific American Law Students Association, Chief Justice Earl Warren Professor of Constitutional Law Kenji Yoshino spoke about the phenomenon of ‘covering,’ discussed at length in his first book, Covering: The Hidden Assault on Our Civil Rights. The Korematsu Lecture Series, since 2000, has recognized Asian Americans whose work challenges legal boundaries and serves as an inspiration to all people of color.

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Professor Kenji Yoshino touched upon his extensive research regarding the frequency of incidence and perceived impact of covering. As opposed to “passing,” the practice of concealing a part of one’s identity in order to present as a member of the dominant major, “covering” differs in that a person who covers is unable to completely conceal that part of his or her identity so must instead downplay qualities associated with it. In Prof. Yoshino’s words, “covering” is a tax that minorities have to pay in response to a much less visible second-wave discrimination. Examining both the demand and the performance of covering, the research explores whether certain professional organizations live up to their stated values of inclusion. Asking the question of whether certain groups feel as though they must cover in order to be successful and have their successes attributed to their personal qualities rather than their race, Prof. Yoshino identified four kinds of covering: (1) appearance-based covering (e.g. a black woman straightens her hair to downplay her race), (2) affiliation-based covering that avoids behaviors associated with identity (e.g. a mother avoids talking about her children because she does not want her co-workers to believe she is less committed to work), (3) advocacy-based covering that determines how much a person ‘sticks up’ for their group (e.g. a veteran lets a military joke slide lest he or she be seen as strident), and (4) association-based covering (e.g. a gay man does not bring his partner to work functions so as not to be seen as ‘too gay’).

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In many ways, Prof. Yoshino’s research brings together many groups who feel the need to cover their identity, including the often elevated or demonized straight white males who feel they have to cover other factors, such as their socioeconomic background or their veteran status. At the same time, his findings also reveal the differences in impact respectively felt by members of different groups. Whereas most people feel the impact of covering, racial groups feel the impact to a greater degree, with no one impacted more than women of color who must simultaneously play down both their gender and race.

Here are some of the ways you could say I am “white”: 
I listen to National Public Radio. 
I have few close friends “of color." 
I furnish my condo a la Crate & Barrel. 
I vacation in charming bed-and-breakfasts. 
I have never once been the victim of blatant discrimination. 
I am a member of several exclusive institutions. 
I have been in the inner sanctums of political power. 
I have been there as something other than an attendant. 
I have the ambition to return. 
I am a producer of the culture. 
I expect my voice to be heard. 
I speak flawless, unaccented English. 
I subscribe to Foreign Affairs. 
I do not mind when editorialists write in the first person plural. 
I do not mind how white television casts are. 
I am not too ethnic. I am wary of minority militants. 
I consider myself neither in exile nor in opposition. 
I am considered “a credit to my race.”

– Eric Liu, The Accidental Asian: Notes of a Native Speaker

"The loudest duck gets shot,” laughed Prof. Yoshino. Underscoring a dark history of discrimination, Prof. Yoshino explained how Asian Americans occupy a liminal space in which they are seen both as “honorary whites” and perpetual foreigners. Asian Americans cover or reverse-cover in numerous ways, either feeling pressure to live up to the model minority myth or feeling pressure to perform and act in certain ways to emphasize their Asian American identity. Professional Asian women are the least likely to have children. Asian Americans cover on the issue of age, often engaging in behaviors like wearing glasses or dressing conservatively in order to appear older and more authoritative. 

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(Above: Prof. Kenji Yoshino and former student and AABANY member George Hang.)

“Covering” gives a name to the phenomenon, which gives a person the tools to self-diagnose and consciously uncover. What is called for now by Prof. Yoshino’s research is self-reflection within organizations and communities. Having leaders who do not have to downplay their identities works to dismantle the harmful associations which might lead a person of color, mother, or other marginalized person to cover. 

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Prof. Yoshino closed with his own uncovering story: his own title, previously the “Earl Warren Professor of Constitutional Law” at NYU, had been a delicate issue in accepting his position. A Japanese American, Kenji Yoshino had been wary of taking on the title of the man who as Attorney General commissioned the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. After much deliberation, the offer was again extended to Prof. Yoshino, appending the words “Chief Justice” – after the initial confusion, Prof. Yoshino learned that later in life as Chief Justice, Earl Warren had recanted and expressed his deep regret that he had ever done such a dishonorable action. In the spirit of the Chief Justice, Prof. Yoshino accepted the position – his research works to change perceptions and increase cultural awareness for the better, and that deeply matters, even over the course of one lifetime. 

~

Special thanks to Prof. Kenji Yoshino, the NYU Asian Pacific American Law Students Association, and Hanah Kim and Ted Kim of the Korematsu Committee for continuing the tradition of education and inspiration! 

Asian/Pacific/American Institute at NYU and Asia Society’s The Escape and Rescued Memories: New York Stories

Co-presented by the Asian/Pacific/American Institute at NYU and Asia Society

The Escape and Rescued Memories: New York Stories 

ThursdayFriday, May 8-9, 20148PM

by Lenora Lee Dance with Kei Lun Martial Arts & Enshin Karate, South San Francisco Dojo

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Directed by A/P/A Institute at NYU Visiting Scholar Lenora Lee, the interdisciplinary performance works The Escape and Rescued Memories: New York Stories excavate the lives of early 20th century Chinese women migrants through dance, martial arts, film, and music.

The Escape is inspired by stories of women who, after being trafficked into the United States, sought refuge in San Francisco’s Donaldina Cameron House, a faith-based social service agency that today continues to serve Asian communities living in San Francisco’s Chinatown. Rescued Memories: New York Stories retraces the life of Bessie M. Lee (Bessie You Toy–b. 1894), who spent two years in indentured servitude after migrating to New York City to work for a wealthy Chinese family.

Both evenings’ performances will be followed by special conversations featuring the artists, community organizers, and scholars.

TICKETS

Image credit: Robert Sweeney.

Prof. Kang to Lecture at NYU on Implicit Bias and Stereotype Threat

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On behalf of The Joseph and Gwendolyn Straus Institute for the Advanced Study of Law & Justice, you are cordially invited to attend a lecture, part of The Straus Public Lectures Series:

“The Grand Challenges of Implicit Social Cognition and the Law”

presented by
 
Jerry Kang
Straus Fellow, David M. Friedman Fellow, NYU School of Law; 
Professor of Law and Asian American Studies (by courtesy), UCLA
_________________________________

Date:
Tuesday, February 11th, 2014
 
Time:  6:00-7:30pm Lecture
7:30-8:30pm Post-lecture Reception
 
Location: 
Faculty Library
Vanderbilt Hall, 3rd Floor
40 Washington Square S.
New York, NY 10012
 
Please kindly RSVP,  if you would like to attend.

Lecture Synopsis: Recent findings in experimental social psychology have demonstrated the existence of “implicit biases”–attitudes and stereotypes that we are neither aware of nor necessarily endorse. Social scientists have also discovered “stereotype  threat”–that negative  stereotypes can undermine performance when an individual believes that by doing poorly she will confirm those very stereotypes about the groups to which  she  belongs. In this talk, Professor Jerry Kang will survey the science of implicit biases and stereotype threat with emphasis on real-world consequences. Then, he will explore their implications for law, policy, and legal theory. Along the way, Prof. Kang will outline what he sees as the field’s “Grand Challenges” for the next quarter century. 
 
The lecture is open to the public; please feel free to spread the word about the event.

From the Empire Mock Trial Association: 8th Annual Downtown Mock Trial Tournament

Earn 3 free CLE credits while educating top collegiate mock trial competitors! 

The nonprofit Empire Mock Trial Association (“EMTA”), in conjunction with NYU Mock trial, is pleased to invite you to our eighth annual Downtown Invitational mock trial tournament on January 25-27 at Kings County Supreme Court in Brooklyn. Each year the Downtown brings together sixteen of the top collegiate trial advocacy teams. This year’s field includes Harvard, Columbia, NYU, Virginia, and the defending national champion, Florida State University.

You can help teach talented, motivated college students about the law by volunteering just a few hours of your time. In exchange, we’ll provide you with free non-transitional CLE credits in the category of skills. 

I’ve included general information about the event below, and you can register to judge here:  http://www.empiremocktrial.org/site/judge.  
  • Features four preliminary rounds of competition, and you can judge as many or as few as you like—no litigation experience is required
  • Please free to invite a friend or colleague to co-judge with you at the tournament.  We’ll pair you together!
  • 16 top trial advocacy teams will compete including Harvard, Columbia, NYU, Virginia, and defending national champion Florida State University
  • We’ll serve complimentary food and beverages as a token of our appreciation
  • Registering takes less than a minute – just visit our site
We’d be happy to answer any questions you may have.  Feel free to call (917-426-EMTA) or e-mail us (admin@empiremocktrial.org)

In Our Own Backyards: The Need For a Coordinated Judicial Response to Human Trafficking

In Our Own Backyards: The Need For a Coordinated Judicial Response to Human Trafficking