A.G. SCHNEIDERMAN ANNOUNCES HOTLINE FOR VOTERS TO ENSURE BALLOT ACCESS DURING STATEWIDE GENERAL ELECTIONS

News from Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE October 29, 2015

New York City Press Office / 212-416-8060 Albany Press Office / 518-776-2427 nyag.pressoffice@ag.ny.gov Twitter: AGSchneiderman

A.G. SCHNEIDERMAN ANNOUNCES HOTLINE FOR VOTERS TO ENSURE BALLOT ACCESS DURING STATEWIDE GENERAL ELECTIONS

Attorney General Addresses Barriers To The Ballot Box By Offering Voters A Statewide Election Day Hotline

NEW YORK –Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman will operate a statewide Election Day Hotline during the general election this Tuesday, November 3rd. Voters encountering barriers to access at their polling sites can report those issues to the Attorney General’s Office by calling the hotline at 800-771-7755, or by emailing the office at civil.rights@ag.ny.gov.  The Hotline will be available from 6:00 A.M. until 9:00 P.M. on Election Day.

“The right to vote is the cornerstone of our democracy, and every eligible voter must be able to participate meaningfully in our electoral process,“ said Attorney General Schneiderman. “My office will not tolerate any barriers that hinder eligible New Yorkers from casting an effective ballot during Tuesday’s election.”

Polls open at 6:00 A.M. and close at 9:00 P.M in all counties across the state.

The Attorney General’s Civil Rights Bureau has operated the statewide Election Day Hotline since November 2012.  In that time the Bureau has fielded hundreds of calls and worked with dozens of Boards of Elections across the state to address barriers at polling sites throughout New York state, including reports pertaining to polling site accessibility for voters with disabilities, language accessibility for non-English speaking voters, voter intimidation and other ballot access issues.

The Attorney General’s Election Day Hotline is being led by Assistant Attorney General Ajay Saini of the Civil Rights Bureau, which is led by Bureau Chief Kristen Clarke.  The Social Justice Division is led by Executive Deputy Attorney General Alvin Bragg.

NAPABA Officer Elections Underway

NAPABA Officer Elections Underway

AABANY Reminder to Vote in the NAPABA Election

REMINDER: The election closes on Sunday, September 15 at 11:59 pm PDT. All votes must be cast by then to be counted. If you have not received a ballot, please contact the NAPABA office at 202-775-9555 or by email to elections@napaba.org.

 
AABANY’s Board unanimously endorses Han Choi for President-Elect and Mike Yim for VP, Programs and Operations.  AABANY urges all its members to vote for Han Choi and Michael Yim.  Let’s make an impact on this year’s NAPABA election!
 

Click on the image to download the flyer

 

Let your voice be heard.

Cast your vote TODAY.

From APIAVote: Census Analysis of Asian American Electorate

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June 7, 2013                                     

Asian American Voters Continue Decade-Long Trend,
Add 500,000 New Voters
 
WASHINGTON—Asian American Justice Center (AAJC), Asian and Pacific Islander American Vote (APIAVote), and National Asian American Survey (NAAS) today issued the following statement on the release of census analysis on the voting participation rates in Election 2012:
 
The latest Census analysis confirms that the Asian American electorate is on the rise. In line with our estimates from the “Behind the Numbers” report released earlier this year, the Census Bureau shows that more than 3.9 million Asian Americans voted in the 2012 elections, accounting for nearly 3% of all voters. This was an increase of more than 500,000 voters from 2008.
 
Below, we highlight three important aspects about the Asian American electorate: continued rates of rapid growth at the national level; growing electoral relevance of the population in many states; and the ongoing need for survey data with Asian language support.
 
Key findings at the national level from the report and the associated data include:
 
  • The growth of the Asian American electorate was relatively steady between 2004-8 and 2008-12 (an increase of about 589,000 and 547,000 in each period). By contrast, the number of white voters rose by about 475,000 between 2004-8, and declined by about 2 million between 2008-12.
  • The biggest growth in the Asian American electorate was between 2000 and 2004, with 723,000 new voters. However, 2004 was also a year that saw an increase of 10 million white voters, thereby muting the electoral affect of Asian American’s growth.
  • The Asian American share of the voting population has been steadily increasing, from 1.8 percent of all voters in 2000 and 2.2 percent in 2004, to 2.6 percent in 2008, and 2.9 percent in 2012.
  • Voter registration remains a significant hurdle for Asian Americans, with only 56 percent of adult citizens registered to vote in 2012. This compares to registration rates of 72 percent and 73 percent among whites and blacks, respectively, and 59 percent among Latinos.
  • Once registered, however, Asian Americans turn out in rates comparable to other groups: 84 percent for Asian Americans, 82 percent for Latinos, 87 percent for whites, and 91 percent for blacks.
State data is in line with the national data, showing that the Asian American electorate is an increasingly important voting bloc.
 
Asian American voters in California and New York, states with the two largest Asian American communities, turned out at or above the national rate. 84% of registered Asian American voters in California and more than 86 percent in voters in New York voted in 2012 election.
 
In the 15 states that APIAVote, AAJC, and other partners supported organizations to increase civic participation, Asian American voters turned out at or above 84% in almost all 15 states. Asian Americans in Georgia and Washington turned out at about 95%, nearly 93% in Ohio, above 89% in Minnesota and Florida, and above 86% n Illinois, Michigan, and Virginia. Of the 15 states, Texas had the lowest turnout at 71.6% and Nevada at 81.7%, although these are all within the survey’s margin of error.
 
While we are pleased with the latest Census Bureau analysis, we remain concerned that it may not tell the full story of the Asian American electorate because its survey is conducted only in English and Spanish. For example, in “Behind the Numbers,” where more than 40% of the Asian American and Pacific Islander registered voters surveyed responded in an Asian language, we found turnout among those who had difficulty speaking English was 9% lower (75%) than those who did not (84%).
 
“Behind the Numbers” indicated that voter turnout varied significantly by ethnicity. For example turnout among Laotians and Cambodians was lowest in 2012 at 40% and 62% while turnout was highest among Hmong and Japanese at 89%. 
 
The steady increase in new voters and the high rates of turnout among growing Asian Americans communities across the country indicate that as more Asian Americans become naturalized citizens and as their U.S.-born children enter adulthood, Asian Americans will continue to grow as an important voting bloc for future elections.

For more information on this growing electorate, “Behind the Numbers” is available at: http://www.apiavote.org/sites/default/files/btn_final_singles_FINAL_0.pdf.  

Further details from the census report can be found at http://www.apiavote.org/sites/default/files/Census%202012%20Voting%20Rates.pdf