Friday Evening Lecture Series: Asian/Asian American Scholars of Education

On Friday, March 8, 2019, AAARI, a CUNY-wide scholarly research and resource center on policies and issues that affect Asians and Asian Americans, is holding a talk, Asian/Asian American Scholars of Education: 21st Century Pedagogies, Perspectives, and Experiences, by Nicholas D. Hartlep & Daisy Ball from 6pm to 8pm, at 25 West 43rd Street, 10th Floor, Room 1000, between 5th & 6th Avenues, Manhattan.

The talk is free and open to the general public. To RSVP for this talk, please visit https://19-03-08hartlep.eventbrite.com. Please be prepared to present proper identification when entering the building lobby. If you are unable to attend the talk, streaming video and audio podcast will be available online the following week.

Nicholas D. Hartlep and Daisy Ball will discuss their book Asian/American Scholars of Education: 21st Century Pedagogies, Perspectives, and Experiences, which shares the knowledge and travails of Asian/American luminaries in the field of education. This unique collection of essays acknowledges the struggle that Asian/American Education scholars have faced when it comes to being regarded as legitimate scholars deserving of endowed or distinguished status.

Books will be available for purchase ($40 each, cash and credit card accepted) and signing after their talk.

AAARI.info – Asian/Asian American Research Institute

AAARI.info – Asian/Asian American Research Institute

AAARI-CUNY Lecture Series: We Too Sing America

From the Asian American / Asian Research Institute (AAARI) at the City University of New York (CUNY):

Please join us for a talk on, We Too Sing America – Deepa
Iyer in Conversation with Zohra Saed, on Friday, March 18, 2016, from 6pm to
8pm, at 25 West 43rd Street, 10th Floor, Room 1000, between 5th & 6th
Avenues, Manhattan. This talk is free and open to the general public.

Author and nationally renowned activist Deepa Iyer, in
conversation with Brooklyn based Afghan American poet Zohra Saed, will discuss
her book We Too Sing America: South Asian, Arab, Muslim, and Sikh Immigrants
Shape Our Multiracial Future.

Many of us can recall the targeting of South Asian, Arab,
Muslim, and Sikh people in the wake of 9/11. We may be less aware, however, of
the ongoing racism directed against these groups in the past decade and a half.
In We Too Sing America, Deepa Iyer catalogs recent racial flash points, from
the 2012 massacre at the Sikh gurdwara in Oak Creek, Wisconsin, to the violent
opposition to the Islamic Center of Murfreesboro, Tennessee, and to the Park 51
Community Center in Lower Manhattan.

Iyer asks whether hate crimes should be considered domestic
terrorism and explores the role of the state in perpetuating racism through
detentions, national registration programs, police profiling, and constant
surveillance. She looks at topics including Islamophobia in the Bible Belt; the
“Bermuda Triangle” of anti-immigrant, anti-Muslim hysteria; and the
energy of new reform movements, including those of “undocumented and
unafraid” youth and Black Lives Matter.

Deepa Iyer is an activist, writer, and lawyer with a strong
commitment to intersectional, community-based, racial justice issues in the
United States. The former Executive Director of South Asian Americans Leading
Together (SAALT), Deepa is currently the Senior Fellow at the Center for Social
Inclusion where she provides analysis, commentary and scholarship on how to
build equity and solidarity in America’s changing racial landscape.

Zohra Saed is a Brooklyn based Afghan American poet. Her
poetry and essays have been published in numerous anthologies and journals.
Zohra is a doctoral candidate at The City University of New York Graduate
Center. As a Lecturer, she initiated the following courses at Hunter College:
Arab American Literature; West Asian American Literature and Film; and Central
Asian Film and Literature.

To RSVP for this talk, please visit
www.aaari.info/16-03-18Iyer.htm. Please be prepared to present proper
identification when entering the building lobby.

If you are unable to attend the talk, it will be live
webcasted on our website, www.aaari.info,
beginning 6:15PM EST, and also available the following week as streaming
video and audio podcast. See you on Friday!

Navigating Model Minority Stereotypes: Asian Indian Youth in South Asian Diaspora

Please join us for a talk on, Navigating Model Minority Stereotypes: Asian Indian Youth in South Asian Diaspora, by Rupam Saran, on Friday, March 11, 2016, from 6pm to 8pm, at 25 West 43rd Street, 10th Floor, Room 1000, between 5th & 6th Avenues, Manhattan. This talk is free and open to the general public.

Though Asian Indians are typically thought of as a “model minority”, not much is known about the school experiences of their children. Positive stereotyping of these immigrants and their children often masks educational needs and issues, creates class divides within the Indian-American community, and triggers stress for many Asian Indian students. In her new book, Prof. Rupam Saran examines second generation (America-born) and 1.5 generation (foreign-born) Asian Indians as they try to balance peer culture, home life and academics. It explores how, through the acculturation process, these children either take advantage of this positive stereotype or refute their stereotyped ethnic image and move to downward mobility.

Focusing on migrant experiences of the Indian diasporas in the United States, this volume brings attention to highly motivated Asian Indian students who are overlooked because of their cultural dispositions and outlooks on schooling, and those students who are more likely to underachieve. Prof. Saran highlights the assimilation of Asian Indian students in mainstream society and their understandings of Americanization, social inequality, diversity and multiculturalism.

Rupam Saran is an Associate Professor of Education at  Medgar Evers College/CUNY. Dr. Saran’s book with co-author Dr. Rosalina Diaz, Beyond Stereotype: Minority children of immigrants in urban schools, analyzes the effect of stereotyping on the school experiences of children of new immigrants. Recent journal publications include articles in Journal of Urban Learning, Teaching, and Research, In the South Asian Diaspora, The Hispanic Educational Technology Services (HETS) Online Journal, and The Anthropologist.

To RSVP for this talk, please visit www.aaari.info/16-03-11Saran.htm. Please be prepared to present proper identification when entering the building lobby.

If you are unable to attend the talk, it will be live webcasted on our website, www.aaari.info,  beginning 6:15PM EST, and also available the following week as streaming video and audio podcast. See you on Friday!

Friday Evening Lecture Series

AAARI’s Friday Evening Lecture Series is back for the Spring 2016 semester! Please join us for a talk on, Making a Global Immigrant Neighborhood: Brooklyn’s Sunset Park, by Tarry Hum, on Friday, March 4, 2016, from 6pm to 8pm, at 25 West 43rd Street, 10th Floor, Room 1000, between 5th & 6th Avenues, Manhattan. This talk is free and open to the general public.

Based on more than a decade of research, Making a Global Immigrant Neighborhood charts the evolution of Sunset Park-with a densely concentrated working-poor and racially diverse immigrant population-from the late 1960s to its current status as one of New York City’s most vibrant neighborhoods. Author and professor, Tarry Hum, will discuss how processes of globalization, such as shifts in low-wage labor markets and immigration patterns, shaped the neighborhood. She explains why Sunset Park’s future now depends on Asian and Latino immigrant collaborations in advancing common interests in community building, civic engagement, entrepreneurialism, and sustainability planning. She shows, too, how residents’ responses to urban development policies and projects and the capital represented by local institutions and banks foster community activism.

Tarry Hum is Professor of Urban Studies at Queens College/CUNY, and serves on the Doctoral Faculty at the CUNY Graduate Center’s Environmental Psychology program. Prof. Hum’s research areas focus broadly on immigration, community economic development, and urban planning. She has researched and published papers on the socioeconomic processes and outcomes of immigrant incorporation in urban labor markets, related issues of immigrant settlement and neighborhood change, and the consequences for urban inequality, race and ethnic relations, political representation, and community definition and development.

To RSVP for this talk, please visit www.aaari.info/16-03-04Hum.htm. Please be prepared to present proper identification when entering the building lobby.

If you are unable to attend the talk, it will be live webcasted on our website, www.aaari.info, beginning 6:15PM EST, and also available the following week as streaming video and audio podcast. See you on Friday!

The Political Activism of Sikhs in Canada and the United States, Feb. 4

Happy 2015! Join CUNY’s Asian American / Asian Research Institute for a co-sponsored talk on, The Political Activism of Sikhs in Canada and the United States, by Prema Kurien, on Wednesday, February 4, 2015, from 3:30pm to 5:30pm, at Roosevelt House – Hunter College/CUNY, 47-49 East 65th Street, 2nd Floor Meeting Room, Manhattan. This talk is free and open to the general public.

Dr. Preema Kurien will discuss differences in the civic and political activism patterns of Sikhs in Canada and the United States. Dr. Kurien’s talk draws on an ongoing research project examining how differences in the social, political, and religious opportunity structures of Canada and the United States, as well as the characteristics of groups, shape the political incorporation of religious minorities. South Asians comprise the largest “visible minority group” in Canada. Her main focus is on Sikhs and Hindus (from India, Sri Lanka, and the Indian diaspora in the Caribbean) since they manifest interesting differences in political mobilization within Canada and the United States and between the two countries. She is conducting research for this project in Toronto, Vancouver, New York, and Northern California through interviews and some field research, analyses of information regarding the advocacy organizations as well as the media coverage of the groups in the two countries.  

Prema Kurien is the 2014-2015 CUNY Thomas Tam Visiting Professor and Professor of Sociology at Syracuse University. Dr. Kurien’s recent research focuses on race and ethnic group relations, as well as the role of religion in shaping group formation and mobilization among contemporary ethnic groups. She has received postdoctoral fellowships and grants from the National Science Foundation, The Woodrow Wilson International Center, the Carnegie Corporation, the Society for the Scientific Study of Religion, the Pew Charitable Trusts, the Center for the Study of Religion at Princeton University, the American Institute of Indian Studies, the Louisville Institute, and the New Ethnic and Immigrant Congregations Project. Her work has been recognized with a Contribution to the Field award, two national book awards, and three national article awards. 

Co-Sponsor: Mapping of Asian Americans in New York (MAANY)

To RSVP for this talk, please visit www.aaari.info/15-02-04Kurien.htm. See you on February 4th!

Talk on ‘Secret of a Thousand Beauties: A Novel’

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Dear AAARI Friend,  

Join us for a lecture on, Secret of a Thousand Beauties: A Novel, by Mingmei Yip, on Friday, December 12, 2014, from 6pm to 8pm, at 25 West 43rd Street, 10th Floor, Room 1000, between 5th & 6th Avenues, Manhattan. This talk is free and open to the general public.

Mingmei Yip will discuss her new novel, Secret of a Thousand Beauties, illustrated with slides showing masterpieces of Chinese embroidery rarely seen outside Chinese museums. Set against the vibrant and intrigue-laden backdrop of 1930s China, Mingmei Yip’s enthralling novel explores one woman’s defiant pursuit of independence. Dr. Yip will also discuss what women’s crafts reveal about the lives of women in traditional China. Readings and book signings will be included.

Mingmei Yip is a novelist writing in English about the lives and struggles of Chinese women, both in China and America. Mingmei is currently finishing her seventh novel, The Witches’ Market, which will be released in 2015 by Kensington Books.  

Dr. Yip’s debut novel Peach Blossom Pavilion, the story of the last musician-courtesan of China, has received numerous favorable reviews and is in its fifth printing. It has just been published by Harper Collins Avon in March, 2014. Mingmei’s novels have been translated into nine languages and are currently  available in ten countries.

Dr. Yip is also a renowned qin musician, calligrapher and painter. She received her PhD in musicology from the Sorbonne, University of Paris.

To RSVP for this talk, please visit www.aaari.info/14-12-12Yip.htm. Can’t make it to the talk? View the live webcast on our homepage beginning at 6:15PM EST, or access the streaming video and audio podcast the following week. 

Asian American / Asian Research Institute 13th Annual Gala

2014 AAARI Gala

Dear AAARI Friend,

10 days and counting until Asian American / Asian Research Institute’s 13th Annual Gala, on Thursday, November 20, 2014, from 6:30pm to 9:30pm, at Jing Fong Restaurant, 20 Elizabeth Street, Manhattan. Come celebrate AAARI’s achievements over the past year and honor our awardees for their leadership, distinguished success, and commitment to the Asian American / Asian community. Meet faculty, staff and students within CUNY, and academic, business, civic and community leaders and organizations outside of CUNY.

Gala Ticket Prices

$150 (General) | $85 (AAARI Member/Senior) | $50 (Student)

Table of Ten Prices 

$5,000 (Diamond) | $3,000 (Ruby) | $2,000 (Pearl) | $1,500 (Jade)

RSVP Deadline: November 17, 2014

For RSVP and more Information, please go to: http://www.aaari.info/2014banquet.htm 

Bollywood and Beyond: Visual Appeal in Costumes in Indian Films

Please join the Asian American / Asian Research Institute for a talk on, Bollywood and Beyond: Visual Appeal in Costumes in Indian Films, by Deepsikha Chatterjee, on Friday, November 7, 2014, from 6pm to 8pm, at 25 West 43rd Street, 10th Floor, Room 1000, between 5th & 6th Avenues, Manhattan. This talk is free and open to the general public.

Deepsikha Chatterjee will present on her 2010 project with Cheri Vasek (University of Hawai’i, Manoa), through a grant from the United States Institute of Theatre Technology, to travel to India and study the process of Indian film production with focus on the work of costume designers. With the most number of films produced per annum in India, partly because of many regional language production centers, Indian films appeal to the one billion plus Indian people, South Asian populations, the Indian diaspora across the world, as well as many global viewers. International distributors have now taken an interest in these films with many being screened in the diverse New York City area and across United States.  

During this research, interviews were conducted with directors, actors, producers, assistant directors, costume designers, stylists, dress men, costume tailors, embroidery experts, dyers, shoe and armor makers, milliners and at film studios and rental houses at the various regional centers viz. Mumbai, Chennai, Hyderabad and Kolkata to understand the working of this complex industry. These visits and discussions were also documented in photos that have now been curated and displayed at an exhibit at the East West Gallery Honolulu, Hawai’i. 

Deepsikha Chatterjee is a lecturer in the Theater department at Hunter College/CUNY. Originally from India, Prof. Chatterjee finished her undergraduate degree in Fashion Design from National Institute of Fashion Technology in Chennai and a BS in Psychology from University of Madras. After working in the global clothing manufacturing industry in India she moved to the US to pursue a  MFA in costume design from Florida State University. Over the years she has worked at many professional theatres including Glimmerglass Opera, Utah Shakespearean Festival and Santa Fe Opera among others. In 2013, she received a PSC CUNY grant to study masks of Chau dance from eastern India. Parts of this research has been mounted as an exhibit at the East West Center at University of Hawaii.

To RSVP for this talk, please visit www.aaari.info/14-11-07Chatterjee.htm. Can’t make it? View or listen to the video and audio podcast the following week on our website.   

For details on all of AAARI’s upcoming events and to view videos of past activities, please visit www.aarari.info.