Join NAPABA at the Unity March in Washington, D.C.

Saturday, June 25, 2022 | 12:00 – 3:00 pm ET

NAPABA is a proud co-sponsor of the first-ever Unity March, an Asian American multicultural event to advance socioeconomic and cultural equity, racial justice, and solidarity. The Washington, D.C., mobilization aims to bring together the diverse Asian American and Pacific Islander diaspora with multicultural partners across the LGBTQ+, Muslim, disability communities, Black, Indigenous, Latinx, and Arab American communities. The goal is to gather more than 25,000 advocates and allies to the National Mall and we need your help to form a robust NAPABA contingent!

Volunteers and Attendees Needed for March

The Unity March is seeking volunteers to serve as rally marshals for the event to ensure everyone’s rights are respected. Rally marshals are responsible for monitoring crowds, reporting any disturbances, directing attendees, and helping ensure the health and safety for all. By signing up for the NAPABA Community Service Corps, a new platform for NAPABA members to take action for impact locally and nationally, you can register for the march as an attendee or a volunteer, and view our other opportunities to be part of a national infrastructure of trained members committed to being AANHPI lawyers in action. Click the Volunteer Now button below and navigate to the “Volunteer Now” tab to sign up.

Events and Travel Details

Reception | Friday, June 24 | 7:00 -9:00 pm

Kick off the Unity March with APIAVote, the host committee organizers, partners, and other special guests at a reception in the Microsoft Innovation and Policy Center. RSVP here.

Poster-Making | Saturday, June 25 | 9:00 – 11:00 am

Join APIAVote for a poster-making session before the Unity March! Stop by the Capital Hilton hotel to make a poster and then head to the Unity March with a large group.

NAPABA Networking Reception | Saturday, June 25 | 4:00 – 6:00 pm

Following the Unity March, there will be a NAPABA networking reception and karaoke in D.C.’s Chinatown at Wok and Roll.

Travel and Stipend

Buses will be made available from New York City, New Jersey (city TBD), Philadelphia and Raleigh/Durham, NC. Buses will leave early morning and arrive in D.C. by 11:30 am. The buses will leave D.C. late afternoon so you can arrive back home that same evening. Complete this form and they will reach out to you for instructions on next steps. To help make our group as large as possible, NAPABA is offering a $250 travel stipend to those who sign up to volunteer. The purpose of the stipend is to assist with travel and/or stay in D.C. for volunteers traveling from out of state.  **You must sign up to volunteer for the march through the NAPABA form to be eligible for reimbursement.**

NAPABA Presents: Board of Governors Election President-Elect Candidates Forum


On Tuesday, August 18 at 1 PM PDT/4 PM EDT, the National Asian Pacific American Bar Association (NAPABA) will be hosting a virtual Meet the President-Elect Candidates Forum.

Don’t miss this valuable opportunity to learn more about the President-Elect candidates! Submit your questions for the candidates to membership@napaba.org prior to the forum.

Candidates for President-Elect

Headshot - Sid Kanazawa
Sid Kanazawa
Headshot - Gary Zhao
Gary Zhao

Moderator

Headshot - Christine Chen
Christine Chen
Executive Director,
APIAVote

Take the time to consider the vision each candidate has for NAPABA and the diverse perspectives across the Board as a whole.

Register here.

From APIAVote: Asian American and Pacific Islander Voters Up for Grabs, Survey Finds

Asian American and Pacific Islander Voters
Up for Grabs, Survey Finds

Behind The Numbers

 
WASHINGTON–Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders–two of the fastest-growing demographics in the U.S.–are open to persuasion by either major party at the ballot box, a new survey released today revealed.
 
The findings in “Behind the Numbers” are the result of a survey that interviewed approximately 6,600 AAPI voters in 11 languages after Election Day sponsored by Asian American Justice Center (AAJC), Asian and Pacific Islander American Vote (APIAVote), and National Asian American Survey (NAAS).
 
Among the significant findings: two-thirds of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders voted for President Obama, yet about half are independent or do not think in terms of political party.
 
“Our research shows that if either major party made significant investments to engage with Asian American and Pacific Islander voters, they could reap significant advantages over the next decade,” said Karthick Ramakrishnan, director of NAAS.  "This is especially the case as Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders have a sizable portion of persuadable voters.“
 
The survey also found that language proficiency made a tremendous difference, both in terms of partisan profile and the presidential election.  For example, the survey found that national polls conducted only in English might have underestimated the vote share for Mitt Romney.  Notably, however, Obama won every segment of the AAPI vote, including 61 percent Vietnamese voters-a group that traditionally voted Republican.
 
The report was an important milestone in surveys of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders because it was conducted in nine Asian languages including Laotian, a first for a national public opinion survey. 
 
"The survey results also revealed the importance of conducting surveys in Asian languages to get accurate results,” said Terry Ao Minnis, director of census & voting programs of AAJC. “Ensuring that legally required language assistance is readily available and easily identifiable at the polls is imperative to safeguard our communities’ ability to exercise fully their constitutional right to vote.”
 
Given its representative national sample, the survey also provided conclusive evidence on partisan and nonpartisan voter engagement efforts in battleground states and in the rest of the country. 
 
“The study confirmed that community organizations played a major role in mobilizing Asian American and Pacific Islander voters and stepped in where the Democratic and Republican parties were absent,” said Christine Chen, executive director of APIAVote. “The parties and other voter mobilizing organizations must invest in linguistically and culturally appropriate outreach to engage our communities for future elections." 
 
The full report is available HERE.