Congresswoman Grace Meng Secures Millions to Help Implement Her Hate Crimes Act Recently Signed into Law by President Biden

WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. Rep. Grace Meng (D-Queens) announced today that she secured $30 million in a key spending bill to expand provisions in her COVID-19 Hate Crimes Act, which President Biden signed into law on May 20th to help combat the ongoing hate and violence against Asian Americans and other impacted communities.

Meng attached the funding to the Commerce, Justice, Science Appropriations bill. The measure now heads to the House floor where it is expected to pass later this month. The money would be provided directly to community-based organizations to implement the COVID-19 Hate Crimes Act’s goal of community engagement, empowerment, and education. One of the major provisions in the new hate crimes law directs federal agencies to work with community-based organizations to raise awareness of hate crimes during the COVID-19 crisis.

“Community-based organizations are the heartbeat of our communities,” said Congresswoman Meng. “Since the beginning of the pandemic, they have been on the front lines standing against the rise in bigotry and attacks. They’ve worked tirelessly to help victims and stop this spike in discrimination and intolerance; and they have done all this under-resourced. As my COVID-19 Hate Crimes Act addresses the problem, we must be certain that community groups have the resources they need to carry out parts of the new law. I am so proud of the new $30 million grant program that would advance community-based approaches to addressing hate crimes. This vital funding would reinforce and expand the critical ground work that these community groups have been doing; it would help them scale up and expand out. I look forward to this funding being approved by the full House and passed by the Senate  – so that our neighbors can live free from hate and violence.”

Community-based organizations and civil rights groups can use the funds for:

  • Implementing and facilitating educational classes and community services for defendants convicted of hate crimes (directly related to the community harmed by the offensive).
  • Culturally competent and linguistically appropriate public education campaigns on the collection of data and public reporting of hate crimes.
  • Safety ambassadors to escort vulnerable community members in public places.
  • In-language support for victims and/or surviving families of hate crimes including mental health support.
  • Providing bystander, de-escalation trainings in multiple languages.
  • Other community-based strategies deemed appropriate for communities of color and other vulnerable and historically disadvantaged communities.

The Commerce, Justice, Science spending bill funds the U.S. Department of Justice, Department of Commerce, and science-related initiatives. Meng is a senior member of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, Science and Related Agencies which determines the funding levels for the measure. The $30 million is allocated under a new grant program called “Community-Based Approaches to Advancing Justice.”

Other provisions of Meng’s COVID-19 Hate Crimes Act include, among other things, creating a position at the Department of Justice to facilitate expedited review of COVID-19 hate crimes, encouraging more reporting of incidents in multiple languages, and expanding public education campaigns aimed at raising awareness of hate crimes and reaching victims.

Meng reintroduced the COVID-19 Hate Crimes Act in March with Senator Mazie Hirono (D-HI). It was passed in Congress with overwhelming and bipartisan support; 364 to 62 in the House and of 94 to 1 in the Senate.

“The Community-based Approaches to Advancing Justice grant, championed by Congresswoman Grace Meng, recognizes that our communities are in crisis,” said Jo-Ann Yoo, Executive Director of the Asian American Federation. “Victims and their families continue to struggle to overcome the terrible physical, mental, and economic toll of hate violence: our seniors are terrified to step outside their doors, and parents are afraid to send their children to school even after months of isolation at home. While the nation’s attention may have shifted from the wave of violence that continues to batter our communities, we are still being called on every day to do the urgent work needed to protect them from further attacks. The Congresswoman clearly understands. This grant is an ambitious and necessary step to enhance and expand community engagement, empowerment, and education against hate. The Asian American Federation is hugely inspired by Congresswoman Grace Meng’s efforts. We thank her for her commitment to support and protect the millions of hard-working Asian Americans that continue to help our nation confront a global pandemic despite the bias they face.”

“Since the beginning of the pandemic, Rep. Meng’s leadership  has been tireless and inspiring,” said Gregg Orton, National Director of the National Council of Asian Pacific Americans (NCAPA). “Her relentless pursuit of justice and greater opportunities for the Asian American community has resulted in meaningful progress in the fight against anti-Asian hate; and we are deeply appreciative of her willingness to work with us towards these solutions. The inclusion of a new grant program at DOJ that will support the work of community-based organizations responding to hate crimes comes at a critical time. So many of our community organizations, who were already under-resourced, have been pushed even further beyond their limits to respond to hate. This provision must be preserved by the Senate.”

“ADL applauds Congresswoman Meng and the Appropriations Committee in their continued efforts to fight against hate,” said Jonathan Greenblatt, CEO of the Anti-Defamation League (ADL). “We welcome the creation of the Community-Based Approaches to Advancing Justice grant program and similar initiatives. Congress and the Administration must continue to prioritize – and fully fund – community-driven, whole-of-society approaches to address all forms of hate.”

“Congresswoman Meng is to be congratulated for her commitment to non-carceral approaches to conflict resolution,” said Laura M. Esquivel, Vice President for Federal Policy and Advocacy at Hispanic Federation. “We urge support for the ‘Community-Based Approaches to Advancing Justice’ grant program which will directly fund trusted community-based groups to build stronger, safer communities through community empowerment and education.”

“It is a long time coming for dollars to assist in the work we struggle to accomplish,” said Ken Cohen, Regional Director of the NAACP New York State Conference Metropolitan Council. “The NAACP embraces the concept and hopes the funding will find its way to the Branches of New York City, New York State and the many other organizations that do this work with little or no funding.”

“The fight for justice must be community-led and organized. By securing a $30 million grant program for community-based organizations, Representative Grace Meng is taking the appropriate steps necessary to ensure that every city in America is safer tomorrow than it was yesterday,” said Alphonso David, President of the Human Rights Campaign. “Vulnerable communities across the country, including trans and non-binary people of color, will be better equipped to prevent and respond to hate crimes because of funding for community-based strategies. The Human Rights Campaign is proud to support this provision in the Commerce, Justice, and Science FY2022 appropriations bill and urges Congress to swiftly enact it into law.”

“SALDEF applauds U.S. Representative Grace Meng’s successful effort in securing $30 million in funding to expand provisions in the COVID 19 Hate Crimes Act, which will support community- based organizations’ engagement, empowerment and education initiatives in regard to hate crimes,” said Kiran Kaur Gill, Executive Director of the Sikh American Legal Defense and Education Fund (SALDEF). “This will directly help communities impacted by hate crimes and provide critical resources to support these efforts. As a community that has been disproportionately targeted by hate crimes, Sikh Americans understand the importance of addressing these issues head on and the consequences if they are gone unchecked. These resources are critical to curbing the discrimination and violence and, by allocating them to community-based organizations, they will go where they are most needed – on the front lines. We sincerely appreciate Representative Meng’s action on this issue. “

“AABANY is immensely appreciative of Congresswoman Meng’s leadership in combating anti-Asian hate,” said Terrence Shen, President of the Asian American Bar Association of New York (AABANY). “Providing these resources to AAPI community groups is critical because they have generally been underfunded, but nonetheless deeply connected to the AAPI community. These organizations have been doing critical work since early in the COVID-19 pandemic. The increased funding will meaningfully amplify their efforts.” 

“This grant program demonstrates a commitment for community-based responses to anti-Asian hate and racism, and builds upon the historic COVID-19 Hate Crimes Act passed in May,” said John C. Yang, President and Executive Director of Asian Americans Advancing Justice | AAJC. “We are pleased that Congress will be funding community organizations that have the cultural competency to reach, serve, and support our diverse Asian American communities through mental health services, public education campaigns, training on how to respond to anti-Asian hate and harassment, and more. We thank Rep. Grace Meng for her strong and steadfast advocacy to ensure that Congress follows through on its promises to meet the needs of our communities. We also extend our appreciation to the organizations that have long been working, and have stepped up during the COVID-19 pandemic, to protect and support those who are the most vulnerable.”

AABANY Report Cited on Brian Lehrer Show (WNYC FM)

The March 1st broadcast of the Brian Lehrer Show featured Arun Venugopal, a senior reporter for WNYC’s Race & Justice Unit. Together, Brian and Arun discussed the alarming rise in anti-Asian violence since the outset of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Brian opened the show by citing statistics from AABANY and Paul, Weiss’ co-authored report: A Rising Tide of Hate and Violence against Asian Americans in New York During COVID-19: Impact, Causes, Solutions. According to the report, there have been more than 2,500 anti-Asian hate incidents nationwide between March and September of 2020. Drawing on another finding of the AABANY report, Arun noted that targeted attacks are particularly commonplace in New York, where Asians are more at risk of physical assault, verbal harassment, and being coughed and spat on. Arun proceeded to draw awareness to a number of local hate incidents, the most recent among them being the stabbing of an Asian American man in Chinatown last Thursday. Citing the opinion of Chris Kwok, AABANY board director and co-executive editor of AABANY’s report, Arun noted that such attacks may be motivated by the stereotype that Asians are “soft targets” who will not fight back. Expanding on this notion, Arun stated that Asians must be seen as part of broader communities that will fight back.

In the remainder of the show, listeners from the Asian American community called in to voice their own experiences as victims of the “soft target” stereotype and express a similar desire for intersectional coalitions. While debates continue over how such coalitions may best be built, Arun pointed out that we all have a role to play in the here and now. By reporting bias incidents to groups like Stop AAPI Hate and the Asian American Federation, whose work is also discussed in the AABANY report, we can ensure that the issue of anti-Asian violence remains at the top of the nation’s political agenda. 

To listen to this episode of the Brian Lehrer Show in its entirety, click here.

Asian American Federation Offers Free “Stay Safe From Hate” Booklet

The Asian American Federation has created a “Stay Safe From Hate” booklet that contains proven and effective methods recommended by experts at the Center for Anti-Violence Education for you and your loved ones to stay safe in hateful and threatening situations.

The FREE Stay Safe from Hate booklet:

  • Helps you to communicate calmly and de-escalate tense situations
  • Teaches you easy techniques to defend yourself physically, and
  • Shows you how to protect others using bystander intervention methods.

Click here to download the booklet.

Asian American Federation of New York’s “The Impact of Covid-19 on Asian American Employment in New York City”

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in a record rate of job loss for Asian New Yorkers, with unemployment benefit applications increasing by more than 6000% from February to June of 2020.

At 1.3 million people, Asian Americans are over 16% of the population in New York City and are growing faster than all other demographics in the City.

In February 2020, Asian Americans in New York City had a jobless rate of 3.4% — however, Asian American unemployment soared to 25.6% by May 2020, the largest increase among all major racial groups. 

AAF’s latest report:

  • Brings you the key demographic data for decision-makers on how different ethnicities within the Asian American community such as Bengali, Chinese, Korean, and so on, were impacted by job losses
  • Identifies the specific industries that Asian American New Yorkers depend on for work
  • Reveals the industries that lost the greatest amount of jobs due to the pandemic
  • Shares recommendations for private and public leaders to help Asian Americans during the COVID-19 recovery

Get your FREE copy of The Impact of Covid-19 on Asian American Employment in New York City sent to your inbox by completing the form at https://aafcovid19resourcecenter.org/unemployment-report/?mc_cid=6ffdf5cf0b&mc_eid=ddd4d683c8.

Asian American Federation Hosts Two-Part Series on Staying Safe During COVID-19 And Beyond

The Asian American Federation (AAF) will be hosting two safety trainings on how individuals can protect themselves and their communities during COVID-19.

On Friday, May 29, 2020, from 3 PM to 5 PM, AAF will be presenting on Using Nonviolent Communication During COVID-19.

On Thursday, June 4, 2020, from 3 PM to 5 PM, AAF will be exploring Using Conflict De-Escalation Strategies In Our Homes.

Register for these events at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/staying-safer-a-two-part-series-tickets-104770272706.

Asian American Federation Hosts Community Upstander Training To Stop Anti-Asian Harassment

On Wednesday, May 27, 2020, from 1 PM to 3 PM, the Asian American Federation will be hosting an Upstander Training workshop to address the ways that xenophobia and scapegoating since the COVID-19 outbreak continue to rise, most consistently against Asian communities.

Through a presentation and interactive break-out groups, participants will explore opportunities and strategies to be “upstanders” during the current moment and help disrupt this wave of anti-Asian bias through safety interventions, de-escalation tactics, and calling-in strategies.

Register for this event at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/community-upstander-training-tickets-105204906708.

In The News: Chris Kwok’s Op-Ed on Weaponized Coronavirus Language Against Asian-Americans Published in the New York Daily News

On March 26, 2020, the New York Daily News published an op-ed co-authored by Chris Kwok. The piece is entitled “Weaponized coronavirus language is endangering Asian-American lives.” (Chris, who sits on the AABANY Board and chairs the Issues Committee, co-wrote the op-ed in his capacity as a Board member of the Asian American Federation).

The article discusses how anti-Asian rhetoric and labeling the coronavirus as “the Chinese virus” is endangering the lives of Asian Americans across the United States. It also provides historical examples of what happens when you link a disease to a particular group of people. It can easily lead to stigma and violence against that group. For example, in the 14th century, Jews were accused of spreading the Bubonic Plague in Europe and massacred. Similarly, in the 1980s to 1990s gay people were blamed for spreading AIDS and suffered violence as a result.

Furthermore, the article notes that this is not the first time Asian Americans have faced something like this in the United States. In the 1850s to 1890s, the Chinese were accused of being carriers of venereal disease and leprosy. As a result of the openly anti-Chinese rhetoric during that period, Chinese people were “…rounded up into thousands of railroad cars, steamers, or logging rafts, marched out of town, or killed.”

Now, history seems to be repeating itself as the spread of the coronavirus pandemic is falsely being attributed to Asian Americans. In recent weeks we have seen a spike in xenophobic incidents targeting Asian Americans throughout the nation. Such incidents include “…Asian Americans being beaten, slashed, kicked, spat at, sprayed with things, yelled at or ostracized in public.” To make matters worse, President Trump’s deliberate campaign to label the coronavirus as “the Chinese virus” has put Asian Americans at an even higher risk.

To read the full article, click here.

AABANY Provides Anti-Sexual Harassment Training to Community Organizations

The Asian American Bar Association of New York (AABANY) was invited by the Asian American Federation and some of its member agencies – not-for-profit organizations that have substantial Chinese-speaking staff – to help with training their limited-English-proficient staff in their native languages on the prevention of sexual harassment in order to meet the new requirements under the New York State and New York City Human Rights Law.

On behalf of AABANY,  Karen Kithan Yau, a co-chair of the Pro Bono and Community Service Committee and Eric Su, a co-chair of the Labor and Employment Law Committee, both of whom are long-time employment lawyers, representing workers and employers respectively, gave three trainings, one in Cantonese Chinese, one in Mandarin Chinese, and one in English. The trainings took place in late September and early October. The training participants included kitchen and housekeeping staff, part-time teachers, museum staff, policy advocates, and an executive director. The discussion was rich, lively, and illuminating.

Every New York State employer is now required to provide sexual harassment training o their employees annually. That means that, as of October 9, 2019, every employer should have provided their first such training. Moreover, the New York State and City laws now protect virtually all employees, including contractors, subcontractors, vendors, consultants or others providing services from sexual harassment in the workplace. Thus the need to provide linguistically and culturally competent instruction is acute. The New York City Human Rights Commission has provided impressive training materials, including online trainings in 11 languages. However, there remain employees who will need training in their native languages. Experienced employment attorneys or skilled trainers of human resources areas who are linguistically and culturally competent will continue to be needed.

Learn more about AABANY’s Pro Bono and Community Service Committee here. Learn more about AABANY’s Labor and Employment Law Committee here. Thanks to Karen and Eric for providing these trainings to organizations serving the Asian American community.

Beyond the Model MINORITY 2018 | ASIAN AMERICAN FEDERATION

Beyond the Model MINORITY 2018 | ASIAN AMERICAN FEDERATION

Asian Americans Rally in Support of DACA and TPS

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

CONTACT:

 Jo-Ann Yoo, (212) 344-5878, x217joann.yoo@aafederation.org

New York City – October 6, 2017:  Yesterday, the Asian American Federation held a rally at Trump Tower with our member agencies and leading immigrant advocacy groups to speak out in support of Asian American Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipients, who are being impacted by the dissolution of the DACA program under the Trump administration. Twenty-three organizations and nearly 200 New Yorkers, including Congresswoman Grace Meng, Council Member Margaret Chin, Assemblymember Yuh-line Niou, Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer, and Comptroller Scott Stringer, joined hands with the Federation to defend the future of our DREAMers.

On the day that marked the deadline to apply for DACA status renewal, organizers mobilized protestors across the pan-Asian community and other immigrant communities to call on Congress to pass a clean DREAM Act as well as extend Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for eligible immigrants from designated countries. Currently, over 136,000 Asian Americans in the U.S. – and over 13,000 Asian Americans in New York State alone – will be stripped of any protection from deportation (or lose the opportunity to apply for such protection) come March of next year, when the DACA program is scheduled to expire. This will leave a significant number of our young people at immediate risk of losing everything, including being subject to imminent deportation. Moreover, TPS expirations begin in January 2018, leaving approximately 9,000 Nepalis vulnerable to losing their TPS in June and having to return to an unstable home country.

The strong turnout at the Asian. American. Dreamer. Rally made it clear to the Trump administration and Congress that the Asian community and other immigrant communities will not stand silently by the sidelines while our family members, friends, colleagues, and neighbors are under threat of losing their civil liberties. DACA beneficiaries have made vital social and economic contributions to the only country they call home, and their removal from our systems will not only tear apart families but also lead to a national economic decline of $433.4 billion over the next decade. Similarly, TPS recipients undergird a significant portion of our workforce in domestic and personal care services, whose exodus would leave many of these industries unable to fill the demand for services.

Jo-Ann Yoo, executive director of the Asian American Federation, said, “We have never been a country that punishes children for their parents’ decisions or turns our back on those who most need our help. The President has rescinded on his promise to protect our vulnerable young people by passing the buck to Congress. Now, Congress must make the moral decision of passing a clean DREAM Act to provide the future generation with an opportunity to live out the lives they were promised.”

Congresswoman Grace Meng (D-Queens) said, “DACA has allowed approximately 800,000 DREAMers to come out of the shadows and contribute to our country. The President’s decision to end the program is inhumane and openly abandons American values. I will keep up the fight in Congress to pass legislation that would allow DREAMers to remain in the United States, and I continue to stand with all these hard-working young people who know America as their only home.”

“President Trump’s cruel decision to end DACA and threaten the Temporary Protected Status program is an affront to who we are as Americans,” said Senator Kirsten Gillibrand. “It doesn’t make us safer, it doesn’t make our economy stronger, and it goes against everything the Statue of Liberty represents. I will continue to fight for our incredible DREAMers and TPS recipients, including the thousands of Asian New Yorkers who will be directly harmed if these protections are taken away from them, and I urge all of my colleagues in the Senate to do the right thing and join me in this fight.”

Rep. Nydia M. Velázquez (D-NY) said, “DREAMers bring new talents and skills to our economy, and they are contributing to every facet of American life. Without DACA, these young people are forced to live in the shadows. Congress must do the right thing and immediately pass a clean DREAM Act.”

Mayor Bill de Blasio said, “The 30,000 Dreamers in this city are our friends, family, and neighbors – and New Yorkers through and through. I urge Congress to act quickly and pass the DREAM Act so these cherished members of our community can stay in the only home they have ever known. In the meantime, free, confidential legal help is available to residents by calling 311 and asking for ActionNYC.”

“Much like today’s DACA recipients, I was once a young immigrant who came to this country in the hope of forging a better life,” said Council Member Margaret S. Chin. “We cannot and must not deny this generation of Dreamers the same opportunity. I join our community in calling on Congress today to act to pass a clean Dream Act.”

“Many in our immigrant communities feel threatened by the Trump Administration’s efforts to destroy protections for Dreamers,” said Assemblymember Deborah J. Glick. “We cannot stand by and let the lives of undocumented young people be destroyed in order to appeal to those who believe that our diversity is a liability. We must band together and push back against anti-immigrant measures in order to demonstrate to the Trump Administration that our diversity is in fact our country’s greatest asset.”

Assemblyman Ron Kim said, “We need to stand up for those who were brought here as children and have grown up in this country. They have made lives for themselves here. Their success is our success, and we cannot abandon them now.”

“Our message to Trump and Congress is simple: DACA needs to stay, and New York’s Asian American community stands firmly behind Dreamers,“ said Assemblywoman Yuh-Line Niou. “Immigrants contribute immensely to our communities, and it is critical that we prevent thousands of young Americans, including Asian American Dreamers, from being pushed into the shadows. I will continue to stand by our Dreamers, and I look forward to working with my colleagues and Asian American advocates to protect immigrant communities across New York State.”

“It is critical that we stand with our communities and join together in speaking out against hate. That is why I strongly support the urgent call to pass the DREAM Act, legislation that will protect Asian American DREAMers and immigrant communities in New York and across the country,” said Assemblywoman Nily Rozic (D,WF-Fresh Meadows).

“We are a country built by immigrants, a culture made richer by immigrants, and a community held together by immigrants. Congress must find the moral courage to stand up to the bigotry and xenophobia of this administration and reinstate DACA immediately,” said Public Advocate Letitia James.

“The President’s decision to end DACA without permanent legislative relief is as cruel as it gets. As the renewal date sunsets, I am proud to stand with an unprecedented coalition of pan-Asian leaders to urge Congress to do the right thing and pass a clean DREAM Act immediately,” said New York City Comptroller Scott M. Stringer.

“I stand in solidarity with the thousands of Asian American DACA recipients whose lives are being negatively impacted by the Trump administration’s dissolution of DACA,” said Council Member Daniel Dromm (D-Elmhurst, Jackson Heights). “DACA is a humane program that has helped thousands of immigrant New Yorkers earn a living and provide for their families. President Trump’s DACA phase-out is heartless and reckless. It flies in the face of all that this country stands for. Congress must immediately pass a comprehensive DREAM Act that will fix our broken immigration system once and for all. As a Council Member representing one of the largest Asian American populations in New York, I will do all that I can to defend DACA’s future and advocate for comprehensive immigration reform.”

Council Member Rory Lancman said, “Donald Trump’s decision to end the DACA program is cruel, callous, and goes against the basic values that make our country great. DACA recipients, thousands of whom live in New York City, contribute greatly to our economy and our communities. These incredible young people should be permitted to continue their pursuit of the American Dream, instead of being forced back to a country they barely know. I am proud to stand with the DREAMers and will work every day to support our immigrant communities.”

“We will not stand by silently while the Trump Administration risks the well-being of immigrant New York, including the one million Asian American immigrants that call New York home,” said Steven Choi, executive director of the New York Immigration Coalition. “We are proud to join our partners at the Asian American Federation to defend DACA and TPS, and to protect the people who truly make America great.”

Margaret Fung, executive director of the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund (AALDEF), said “Since the inception of the DACA program in 2012, AALDEF has worked closely with undocumented AAPI youth to screen for DACA eligibility and to provide them with pro bono representation in filing their DACA applications. As a national organization that protects and promotes the civil rights of Asian Americans, we are calling on Congress to move forward legislation that will protect DACA recipients and other undocumented young immigrants, as well as a long-term legislative fix for the rest of the approximately 11 million undocumented individuals living in the United States.”

“Tearing apart the lives and families of young people – who are just trying to better themselves in America – will be the only accomplishment of ending DACA,” said Christopher Kui, executive director of Asian Americans for Equality. “We all have an obligation to hold up the ideals of our country and in no way does that include deporting the American Dream.”

“The effort to dissolve DACA is yet another example of this administration’s misguided policies that are destroying our country rather than ‘making it great’! Immigrants are built into the very fabric of America, and without immigrants, America would fall apart – economically, socially and politically,” said Annetta Seecharran, executive director of Chhaya Community Development Corporation.

“Chinese immigrants, regardless of their status, have been making significant contributions to this country since the 1800s. We stand with everyone here today to defend DACA and support a ‘clean’ DREAM Act,” said Mae Lee, executive director of the Chinese Progressive Association.

“The Chinese-American Planning Council stands united with our Dreamers and allies in urging Congress to pass a clean DREAM Act and protections inclusive of all immigrants. As the nation’s largest Asian American social services organization, we are committed to providing a welcoming and supportive environment for individuals of all backgrounds,” said Wayne Ho, executive director of the Chinese-American Planning Council.

Kavita Mehra, executive director of Sakhi for South Asian Women said, “Sakhi for South Asian Women firmly opposes President Trump’s decision to end the DACA program. We stand with our immigrant community, remain committed to serving all survivors that walk through our doors regardless of immigration status, and believe that all people are worthy of living with dignity, respect, and opportunity.”

Robina Niaz, executive director of Turning Point for Women and Families, said, “At Turning Point for Women and Families, we work actively with immigrant and Muslim families on a daily basis. We are deeply concerned that educational and employment opportunities and other protection programs currently available to DACA recipients are being threatened. We stand united in the fight against the elimination of DACA and fully support our immigrant sisters and brothers. We call on Congress to protect immigrants’ right to life without fear of deportation and prevent families from being torn apart.”

Rally Co-Sponsors: Adhikaar, Alliance of South Asian American Labor, Arab American Association of New York, Asian American Arts Alliance, Asian American Bar Association of New York, Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund, Asian Americans for Equality, Chhaya Community Development Corporation, Chinese-American Planning Council, Chinese Progressive Association, Council of People’s Organization, Desis Rising Up and Moving, Japanese American Association of New York, Japanese American Social Services, Inc., Korean American Family Service Center, Korean Community Services of Metropolitan New York, MinKwon Center for Community Action, National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance, New York Immigration Coalition, OCA-NY, Sakhi for South Asian Women, Turning Point for Women and Families, University Settlement

The Asian American Federation works to raise the influence and well-being of the pan-Asian American community through research, policy advocacy, public awareness, and organizational development.  Established in 1989, AAF supports over 40 Asian American community service agencies, which work to meet the critical needs of the fastest-growing population in New York City.  For more information, please visit www.aafederation.org.