Model Minority vs Covid-19: Education through Crisis, For Asians in America

Date: Wednesday, June 17, 2020 | Time: 4PM to 5PM

This event will be broadcasted via Facebook Live on the Queens Memory Facebook Page, www.facebook.com/queensmemory.

Covid-19 has sparked an increase in racism against East Asians in America, whether immigrant or native born. However, racism against all groups of Asian descent has been around for much longer, with racist stereotypes and the model minority myth. Join Queens Memory and partners for an online discussion about the current higher educational experience for Asians in America, who are facing the continuously evolving challenge of racism. Also to be discussed is how Asians in America can provide ally-ship and solidarity to other groups that are experiencing racial oppression.

Moderator

  • Frank Wu, President-Designate, Queens College/CUNY

Panel

  • Joyce Moy, Executive Director, AAARI-CUNY
  • Vivian Louie, Director, Asian American Studies Program & Center, Hunter College/CUNY
  • John Chin, Professor, Urban Policy and Planning, Hunter College/CUNY
  • Madhulika Khandelwal, Director, Asian/American Center, Queens College/CUNY
  • Student Representative from the Student Council, Asian/American Center, Queens College/CUNY

Program sponsored by the Queens Memory COVID-19 Project of Queens College and Queens Public Library, Queens College Asian American Center, and Asian American / Asian Research Institute – City University of New York

Friday Evening Lecture Series: Asian/Asian American Scholars of Education

On Friday, March 8, 2019, AAARI, a CUNY-wide scholarly research and resource center on policies and issues that affect Asians and Asian Americans, is holding a talk, Asian/Asian American Scholars of Education: 21st Century Pedagogies, Perspectives, and Experiences, by Nicholas D. Hartlep & Daisy Ball from 6pm to 8pm, at 25 West 43rd Street, 10th Floor, Room 1000, between 5th & 6th Avenues, Manhattan.

The talk is free and open to the general public. To RSVP for this talk, please visit https://19-03-08hartlep.eventbrite.com. Please be prepared to present proper identification when entering the building lobby. If you are unable to attend the talk, streaming video and audio podcast will be available online the following week.

Nicholas D. Hartlep and Daisy Ball will discuss their book Asian/American Scholars of Education: 21st Century Pedagogies, Perspectives, and Experiences, which shares the knowledge and travails of Asian/American luminaries in the field of education. This unique collection of essays acknowledges the struggle that Asian/American Education scholars have faced when it comes to being regarded as legitimate scholars deserving of endowed or distinguished status.

Books will be available for purchase ($40 each, cash and credit card accepted) and signing after their talk.

(Re)Invigorating Asian American Studies at CUNY Campuses

The Hunter College Mapping
Asian American New York (MAANY) Consortium
Presents

 (Re)Invigorating Asian American Studies at CUNY Campuses

March 14th (Thurs), 12:30-2:30 pm
Brooklyn College Library, Room 242

Please join us for a lively conversation with current and former directors of Asian American Studies across CUNY campuses. The panelists will share their insights on how to successfully incorporate Asian American Studies at CUNY, and the barriers they face (and are facing) to sustain their respective programs.

GUEST SPEAKERS:

  • Charlotte Brooks, former director of Asian and Asian American Studies at Baruch College
  • Madhulika Khandelwal, current director of Asian/American Center at Queens College
  • Vivian Louie, current director of the Asian American Studies Program & Center at Hunter College

MODERATED BY: Diana Pan, Assistant Professor, Brooklyn College

CO-SPONSORED BY: Brooklyn College — Dean’s Office of the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Asian/Asian American Studies Steering Committee, American Studies, Women’s and Gender Studies, Haitian Studies Institute, Department of Sociology, Department of Puerto Rican and Latino Studies, Department of Political Science, Department of History, & Coalition of Brooklyn College Radical Asians (COBRA)

Event is open to the public. Guests will need a photo ID to enter the campus, and the library.

RSVP: https://goo.gl/forms/t9iuUz4dNI0CWaw43


AAARI.info – Asian/Asian American Research Institute

AAARI.info – Asian/Asian American Research Institute

KEVIN D. KIM APPOINTED TO CUNY BOARD OF TRUSTEES BY GOVERNOR CUOMO; FIRST PERSON OF KOREAN DESCENT TO SERVE ON CUNY BOARD – CUNY Newswire

KEVIN D. KIM APPOINTED TO CUNY BOARD OF TRUSTEES BY GOVERNOR CUOMO; FIRST PERSON OF KOREAN DESCENT TO SERVE ON CUNY BOARD – CUNY Newswire

Asian American Leadership at CUNY and Higher Education

Sponsored by CUNY Diversity Projects Development Fund 

Please join us for a conference on, Asian American Leadership at CUNY and Higher Education, on Friday, May 6, 2016, from 9:30am to 5pm, at the CUNY Graduate Center, 365 Fifth Avenue, Concourse Level, Manhattan. This conference is free and open to the general public.

There is a remarkable absence of Asian Americans in the upper ranks of leadership at CUNY,and in higher educationnationwide. AAARI will release the findings of its CUNY Asian American Leadership Initiative Report at this conference, and will address recommendations for outreach and recruitment, as well as development of the student and faculty pipeline for leadership.

This conference will focus on why there is a lack of Asian American leadership, best practices for recruitment and professional development, student leadership, tenure and promotion, as well as the importance of Asian American and Asian Studies in preparing and inspiring the next generation of Asian American Leaders.

Keynote Speaker
Dr. Santa Ono, President, University of Cincinnati

Conference Sessions

  • CUNY Asian American Leadership Initiative Report: Findings, Recommendations and Accountability
  • Trajectory to the Top – Barriers on the Path to the Presidency
  • Best Practices: Government Agencies, Foundations, Corporate Sector and Professional Organizations
    • AABANY’s Issues Committee Co-Chair, Chris Kwok, will be speaking on this panel.
  • Student Leadership
  • Tenure and Promotion: Process and Advice
  • State Of Asian American and Asian Studies at CUNY and Its Importance to Asian American Leadership in Higher Education
  • Foundation for the Future – Working Group Discussions

To RSVP and to view the full program for this conference, please visit www.aaari.info/2016leadership.htm. Please be prepared to present proper identification when entering the building lobby.

See you on May 6th!

Saving Face: The Emotional Costs of the Asian Immigrant Myth

Friday Evening Lecture Series

Please join us for a talk on, Saving Face: The Emotional Costs of the Asian Immigrant Myth, on Friday, April 1, 2016, from 6pm to 8pm, at the CUNY Graduate Center, 365 Fifth Avenue, 6th Floor, Room 6304.01, Manhattan. This talk is free and open to the general public, and is co-sponsored by the CUNY Graduate Center – Immigrant Seminar Series.

Tiger Mom. Asian patriarchy. Model minority children. Generation gap. The mainstream discourse has drawn on many generic concepts to describe the prototypical Asian family, which have given rise to two versions of the Asian immigrant family myth. The first celebrates Asian families for upholding the traditional heteronormative ideology of the “normal (white) American family” based on a hard-working male breadwinner and a devoted wife/ mother who raises obedient children. The other demonizes Asian families around these very same cultural values by highlighting the dangers of excessive parenting, oppressive hierarchies, and emotionless pragmatism in Asian cultures. In her new book Saving Face, Angie Chung shatters these one-dimensional portrayals of Asian families and reveals the emotional complexities of family relations in a changing economy through the eyes of adult-age Korean and Chinese Americans.

Based on the moving narratives of daughters and sons of immigrant families, Chung explores how the family roles American-born children assume in adaptation to their specific family circumstances have informed the way they view ethnicity and practice culture as adults. Although they know little about their parents’ lives, the author reveals how Korean and Chinese Americans assemble fragments of their childhood memories, kin-scripted narratives, and racial myths to make sense of their family experiences. Chung argues that this process of managing their feelings helps them to ease the emotional and economic strains of immigrant family life and to rediscover love and empathy through new modes of communication and caregiving. However, the book ultimately finds that these adaptive strategies come at a considerable social and psychological cost that do less to reconcile the racial contradictions and economic strains that minority immigrant families face today.

Angie Y. Chung is an Associate Professor of Sociology at SUNY Albany. Dr. Chung has served as visiting professor at Yonsei and Korea University and is currently the 2016 CUNY Thomas Tam Visiting Professor at the CUNY Graduate Center. Her areas of expertise include immigration and the second generation, community and urban sociology, gender and family, race and ethnicity, Asian American studies, and qualitative methods. She is currently working on an NSF-funded research project on the politics of economic growth and urban redevelopment in Koreatown and Monterey Park, Los Angeles.

To RSVP for this talk, please visit www.aaari.info/16-04-01Chung.htm. Please be prepared to present proper identification when entering the building lobby.

If you are unable to attend the talk, streaming video and audio podcast will be available online the following week.

Thanks to CUNY AAARI for sharing this announcement.

AAARI-CUNY Lecture Series: We Too Sing America

From the Asian American / Asian Research Institute (AAARI) at the City University of New York (CUNY):

Please join us for a talk on, We Too Sing America – Deepa
Iyer in Conversation with Zohra Saed, on Friday, March 18, 2016, from 6pm to
8pm, at 25 West 43rd Street, 10th Floor, Room 1000, between 5th & 6th
Avenues, Manhattan. This talk is free and open to the general public.

Author and nationally renowned activist Deepa Iyer, in
conversation with Brooklyn based Afghan American poet Zohra Saed, will discuss
her book We Too Sing America: South Asian, Arab, Muslim, and Sikh Immigrants
Shape Our Multiracial Future.

Many of us can recall the targeting of South Asian, Arab,
Muslim, and Sikh people in the wake of 9/11. We may be less aware, however, of
the ongoing racism directed against these groups in the past decade and a half.
In We Too Sing America, Deepa Iyer catalogs recent racial flash points, from
the 2012 massacre at the Sikh gurdwara in Oak Creek, Wisconsin, to the violent
opposition to the Islamic Center of Murfreesboro, Tennessee, and to the Park 51
Community Center in Lower Manhattan.

Iyer asks whether hate crimes should be considered domestic
terrorism and explores the role of the state in perpetuating racism through
detentions, national registration programs, police profiling, and constant
surveillance. She looks at topics including Islamophobia in the Bible Belt; the
“Bermuda Triangle” of anti-immigrant, anti-Muslim hysteria; and the
energy of new reform movements, including those of “undocumented and
unafraid” youth and Black Lives Matter.

Deepa Iyer is an activist, writer, and lawyer with a strong
commitment to intersectional, community-based, racial justice issues in the
United States. The former Executive Director of South Asian Americans Leading
Together (SAALT), Deepa is currently the Senior Fellow at the Center for Social
Inclusion where she provides analysis, commentary and scholarship on how to
build equity and solidarity in America’s changing racial landscape.

Zohra Saed is a Brooklyn based Afghan American poet. Her
poetry and essays have been published in numerous anthologies and journals.
Zohra is a doctoral candidate at The City University of New York Graduate
Center. As a Lecturer, she initiated the following courses at Hunter College:
Arab American Literature; West Asian American Literature and Film; and Central
Asian Film and Literature.

To RSVP for this talk, please visit
www.aaari.info/16-03-18Iyer.htm. Please be prepared to present proper
identification when entering the building lobby.

If you are unable to attend the talk, it will be live
webcasted on our website, www.aaari.info,
beginning 6:15PM EST, and also available the following week as streaming
video and audio podcast. See you on Friday!