The Courtroom: Performance of an Immigration Proceeding, Dec. 9

The Waterwell Theater Company is presenting “The Courtroom” at the historic Great Hall at Cooper Union, on Monday, December 9, 2019, at 7:00pm.

The play/performance is about the deportation proceeding of an immigrant from the Philippines who was married to a U.S. Citizen and came to this country on a K3 Visa. After inadvertently registering to vote at the DMV in Bloomington, IL, receiving a voter registration card in the mail, and voting, her removal proceedings were set in motion. It began in Immigration Court and her case was eventually heard by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit. The Courtroom is performed entirely verbatim from court transcripts.

Waterwell is presenting monthly performances of The Courtroom at civic venues around New York City, as part of an ongoing exploration of belonging, immigration, and what it means to be a U.S. Citizen today.

See the flyer below for more details.

The Courtroom: A Re-enactment of Deportation Proceedings

We are sharing this announcement from Bridgette Ahn, former President of KALAGNY and the Network of Bar Leaders:

You are invited to a play/performance re-created from court transcripts of a deportation proceedings.

In 2004, an immigrant from the Philippines who was married to a U.S. Citizen came to this country on a K3 Visa. After inadvertently registering to vote at the DMV in Bloomington, IL, receiving a voter registration card in the mail, and voting, her removal proceedings were set in motion. It began in Immigration Court and her case was eventually heard by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit. The Courtroom is performed entirely verbatim from court transcripts.

Waterwell is presenting monthly performances of The Courtroom at civic venues around New York City, as part of an ongoing exploration of belonging, immigration, and what it means to be a U.S. Citizen today.

UPCOMING PERFORMANCES
** Use code WWFAM for $20 Tickets **

Thursday, October 24 at 7:00pm at Judson Memorial Church (55 Washington Square South)Tickets here.

Thursday, November 21 at 7:00pm at West Park Presbyterian Church (86th + Amsterdam)Tickets here.

Congratulations to Glenn Magpantay on Receiving the Brooklyn Law School Faculty Award for Excellence in Public Service

Glenn Magpantay received the Brooklyn Law School Faculty Award for Excellence in Public Service

On Tuesday, April 9, 2019, Glenn Magpantay, the Executive Director of the National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance (NQAPIA), was honored at Brooklyn Law School’s Public Service Awards Ceremony.

Glenn Manpantay (left) and AABANY GSPI Committee Co-Chair Kevin Hsi (right) at the Public Service Awards Ceremony

Glenn Manpantay, a former AABANY Board member and a current co-chair of the LGBT Committee, was presented with Brooklyn Law School’s Faculty Award for Excellence in Public Service, in recognition of his incredible devotion to educating and fighting for LGBT equality, racial justice and immigrant rights.

Please join AABANY in congratulating Glenn Manpantay for this well-deserved award and honor.

We thank Kevin Hsi for providing the photos for this blog post.

From MinKwon: Immigrants’ Day of Action

Immigrants’ Day of Action

Join MinKwon and New Yorkers for Real Immigration Reform to raise the voice of immigrants in New York City!

Date & Time: April 10, 12 p.m.
Place: Foley Square

On April 10th, we will stand united to call on lawmakers to enact policies that advance immigrant rights and services! We will start off the day with the New York Immigration Coalition and participate in legislative meetings with City Council Members to push City legislative and budget priorities. Then we will join New Yorkers for Real Immigration Reform for a rally at Foley Square to demand Congress pass federal legislation to fix our broken immigration system. Join us to call for a just and fair America for all!
 
Mark your calendars!  RSVP with Jorim Rhee at jorim.rhee@minkwon.org or 718-460-5600.

From NYIC: IMMIGRANTS’ DAY OF ACTION

                                   

*SAVE THE DATE*

IMMIGRANTS’ DAY OF ACTION 

THURSDAY, APRIL 10, 2014

April 10th is an historic day for our movement.  This year, we will be joining groups around the country for a nationwide mobilization demonstrating the power of our movement and calling on lawmakers at the city, state and federal level to enact policies that promote immigrant rights.  Please join the New York Immigration Coalition and New Yorkers for Real Immigration Reform together with our allies across New York City for a rally to demand fairness and equality for immigrants in New York and across the country.

We hope you can also join the New York Immigration Coalition in the morning for legislative meetings with our City Council and our new Mayoral Administration to push the NYIC’s City Policy & Budget Priorities, which, if enacted, would strengthen New York City as a national leader on immigrant rights. 

Join us and help raise the voice of immigrants in New York City!

To RSVP click here

A New Film & Theater Performance By Undocumented Asian Youth

May 20, 7:30-9 | The Culture Project, 45 Bleecker Street

#UndocuAsians brings the lived experiences of people most intimately affected by immigration laws to The Culture Project’s stage. This rare theater performance features undocumented Asian American youth sharing their personal stories of growing up in the United States in a culture of silence. 

The performance opens with a short film following the lives of three undocumented Asian American youth and features an onstage performance by more than a dozen other undocumented youth (members of AALDEF’s undocumented youth group RAISE) whose stories bring a different face to the immigration debate and highlight the diverse and difficult realities that undocumented Asian communities face beyond the conventional “DREAMer” narrative. Poet/activist Kelly Tsai will be a special presenter.

Purchase tickets: undocuasian.eventbrite.com
(student discount available)

#UndocuAsians is presented by RAISE (Revolutionizing Asian American Immigrant Stories on the East Coast). RAISE is a pan-Asian undocumented youth-led group on the East Coast supported by the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund (AALDEF). RAISE aims to create safe spaces in our communities while advocating for humane immigration policies. Our visibility increases through political activism, leadership development, community education, and coalition building. Through youth organizing, we will reimagine and realize justice for immigrants in America.

Can’t make it? You can still support RAISE by clicking here to make a donation!

National Movement to Push for Real Immigration Reform

Asian-led Community Organizations Call on Asian Pacific American New Yorkers to Join the National Movement to Push for Real Immigration Reform in 2013!

New York, NY – Today, February 28, Asian-led organizations citywide came together torally the Asian Pacific American community to join the national movement for immigration reform. The groups endorsed the New Yorkers for Real Immigration Reform Campaign, coordinated by the New York Immigration Coalition and supported by over 150 labor, faith, grassroots and immigrant organizations across the state.

The groups announced their campaign plans, including postcards calling for“real” immigration reform, an Asian Pacific American community-led town hall forum on March 28th at LaGuardia Community College, and a large mobilization on April 10th to Washington, D.C.

“2013 represents our best chance in decades to win immigration reform. The Asian Pacific American community must capitalize on the political power we demonstrated during last November’s election,” said May Chen, President of the New York State Immigrant Action Fund.  “It is critical to have the Asian Pacific American community push Congress and President Obama to pass real reform that keeps families together, protects workers and safeguards our civil rights.

David Chen, Executive Director of the Chinese-American Planning Council, emphasized, “The Asian Pacific American community must be ready to join the fight for immigration reform. The last package was passed over twenty years ago and we cannot wait another moment to fix this outdated system. Immigration reform is the most important legislation of our time and we must act now!

Steve Choi, Executive Director of the MinKwon Center for Community Action outlined three simple ways community members can join the campaign and urged them to “take a minute to sign the postcard, a few hours to participate in a community townhall or a day to travel down to Washington, D.C on April 10 to join thousands of others in a national march.

“Not only should individual community members act, but our sister organizations serving Asian Pacific American New Yorkers must also mobilize and reach out to their Congressional representatives,“ said Vanessa Leung, Deputy Director of the Coalition for Asian American Children and Families. “There is too much at stake for us and this nation, and as Asian Pacific Americans we need our voices heard.”

Explaining what is at stake, Elizabeth OuYang, President of OCA-New York, added, “The current Senate “Gang of Eight” framework does not provide a realistic pathway to citizenship for the 11 million undocumented immigrants living and working in the U.S. We must tell Senator Schumer that our immigrant community members are the backbone of America and we should not have to wait decades to become fully participating members of our society. The process must be shortened and streamlined.”

“As an organization of undocumented South Asian immigrant workers and youth, we welcome immigration reform that is truly just and humane,” said Monami Maulik, Founder and Executive Director of Desis Rising Up and Moving (DRUM) and the Global South Asian Migrant Workers Alliance. “However, we will not sacrifice one community for another. We cannot trade off any more human and civil rights violation, the militarization and deaths of migrants at the borders, the profiling of communities in the name of national security, and the separation of families through arrest, detentions, and deportations. Reform must be rooted in full human rights.“

Highlighting the importance of family reunification, Mae Lee, Executive Director of the Chinese Progressive Association, stated, “The back family visa categories are a major problem for our communities. Currently, it can take decades for an Asian Pacific American citizen or green card holder to be reunited with a family member. We must demand our New York Congressional representatives to push for a comprehensive immigration reform that keeps families together!”

“Three generations of my family have paid a heavy toll because of the backlogs and outdated quotas in family visa categories,” said Angie Kim, an undocumented Korean American and recent DACA recipient, “Though I am the grandchild of U.S. citizens, I lived over a decade of my life undocumented and in limbo. If we are going to keep families together, family reunification must be the bedrock of a reform package.”

Advocating for the rights of immigrant workers essential to New York’s economy, Luna Ranjit, Executive Director of Adhikaar said, “We strongly oppose the work history requirement in the current proposal. It is going to be very difficult for domestic workers, restaurant workers, nail salon workers, day laborers and other informal sector workers to prove employment history in the U.S., let alone continuous employment. The work history requirement will also make it easier for unscrupulous employers to take advantage of the workers seeking to adjust their status, and will further drive millions of workers into the shadows.”

“Comprehensive immigration reform must try to close the gap between the rights of immigrant Americans and U.S.-born Americans,” said Margaret Fung, Executive Director of the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund.  "Recent laws have increasingly promoted racial profiling and resulted in civil rights violations against immigrants. Reform cannot stop short of laws reflecting human rights standards that ensure all workers make a decent living and all families can stay together.“

Rio M. Guerrero, Immigration and Nationality Law Committee Co-Chair of the Asian American Bar Association of New York added, “We support comprehensive legislation that will continue to make the U.S. the destination for world class businesses and the best and brightest workers.”

The APA Table in support of the New Yorkers for Real Immigration Reform Campaign include:

Adhikaar, Asian American Arts Alliance, Asian American Bar Association of New York, Asian Americans for Equality, Asian American Legal Defense & Education Fund, APICHA Community Health Center, Chinese-American Planning Council, Chinese Progressive Association, Coalition for Asian American Children and Families, Desis Rising Up and Moving, Gay Asian & Pac Islander Men of NY, Hamilton-Madison House, Korean American Association of Greater New York, Korean American Family Service Center, Korean American Association of Queens, Korean Americans for Political Advancement, Korean American Business Council of New York, Korean Community Services of Metropolitan NY, MinKwon Center for Community Action, OCA-New York, Q-WAVE, South Asian Council for Social Services, South Asian Lesbian & Gay Association, South Asian Youth Action!, United Chinese Association of Brooklyn, Wonkwang Community Service Center (list in formation)

For more information, contact:
Christina Chang: (718) 460-5600
May Chen: (347) 234-9387
Fahd Ahmed:(718) 205-3036

Press Release: New Report Highlights Opportunity for New York State to Expand Immigrant Health Care Coverage

For Immediate Release

*Press Release*

NEW REPORT HIGHLIGHTS OPPORTUNITIES FOR NEW YORK STATE TO EXPAND IMMIGRANT HEALTH CARE COVERAGE


New York Must Address Eligibility, Documentation, Outreach, and Oversight Barriers to Ensure Access to Health Care for Immigrant New Yorkers

February 6, 2013 (New York) – As New York State works to implement the Affordable Care Act and establish its Health Benefit Exchange, key opportunities exist to expand immigrants’ access to health reform. A report released today by the New York Immigration Coalition (NYIC), the New York State Health Foundation (NYSHealth), and Empire Justice Center urges New York State policymakers to preserve and promote immigrants’ access to health care coverage and offers recommendations to mitigate disparities between citizens and noncitizens in health care.

The report, “Maximizing Health Care Reform for New York’s Immigrants,” written by the NYIC in conjunction with Empire Justice Center,  highlights opportunities for New York to address key factors that can ameliorate or impede immigrants’ access to health care coverage, including eligibility classifications; documentation and verification policies and practices; marketing and outreach; and oversight and monitoring. The report also includes recommendations for ensuring access to care for those immigrants who will remain uninsured even after health reform is implemented. 

Federal health reform will expand coverage opportunities and increase access to care for many of New York State’s uninsured residents, but there are gaps in federal Affordable Care Act provisions regarding the inclusion of immigrants. For example, lawful immigrants will continue to face federal restrictions on enrolling in public health insurance programs, and undocumented immigrants are barred from most types of public coverage and from purchasing coverage in new Health Benefit Exchanges. The report offers recommendations for how New York State can address the health care needs of those left out of federal reform by making policy choices at the state level that expand access to health care coverage for immigrants, as well as by strengthening its safety net system.

“The full participation of immigrants in the Exchange is critical to meeting the goals of health reform,” said Chung-Wha Hong, executive director of the New York Immigration Coalition. “It will be up to New York State to craft an Exchange and related public health programs that are responsive the needs of immigrant New Yorkers. This is the chance for New York to create a health program that serves as a national model for reducing health disparities.”

[Photo left to right] Chung-Wha Hong, executive director of the New York Immigration Coalition and Jackie Vimo, director of advocacy at the New York Immigration Coalition introduce the report, “Maximizing Health Care Reform for New York’s Immigrants.”

New York State’s noncitizens (both lawfully present and undocumented) are three times as likely as citizens to lack health insurance coverage. Impediments to coverage include working for small businesses that are less likely to offer health insurance, having misconceptions about the effect of documentation and public health benefits on their immigration status, and encountering language barriers in enrollment and retention process.

“With implementation of the health reform law, we have an unprecedented opportunity to extend health insurance coverage to more than 1.2 million New Yorkers,” said James R. Knickman, president and CEO of NYSHealth. “Our success in achieving an affordable, equitable health care system that covers as many people as possible is dependent largely on how well the State implements the Affordable Care Act, and how well it serves our immigrant population.”

[Photo above] James R. Knickman, president and chief executive officer of the New York State Health Foundation speaks about the report’s recommendations.

“The health care exchange opens up an exciting new avenue for New York’s immigrants to access affordable health care,” said Barbara Weiner, senior staff attorney at Empire Justice Center, a contributing author to the report. “Nevertheless, New York must continue in its praiseworthy tradition of providing help to those whom the federal government has continued to leave out in the cold.  The young people who are being granted deferred action because they were brought to the U.S. as young children comprise one such group.  Current federal policy excludes them from benefits under both Medicaid and the Exchange.”

[Photo above] Barbara Weiner, senior staff attorney of Empire Justice Center gives more details on the report.

Immigrant community-based organizations (CBOs), such as the New York Immigration Coalition’s 200 member groups, are immigrants’ main source of information and assistance in navigating the health care system. Incorporating these CBOs into outreach and enrollment efforts will be crucial for reaching immigrant communities.  

“With the help of the New York Immigration Coalition, KCS has been able to give presentations to uninsured seniors in our community about their options and help them through the murky public healthcare waters,” said Sandra Oh, community health educator, The Korean Community Services of Metropolitan New York, Inc.

Maha Attieh, health program manager at the Arab-American Family Support Center said, “The uninsured, underserved and low income people in my community reach out to me with many questions that I can’t answer. Due to language barriers, they don’t know how to navigate the system. I hope the new exchange program is affordable and easy to access for the Arab American community. We want our community to be insured and have access to health care to have a healthy life.”         

[Photo above] Maha Attieh, health program manager at the Arab-American Family Support Center speaks about the affect the new exchange program will have on immigrants in her community.

“We see hope that there will be rational and effective healthcare for New York immigrants through the soon to be implemented New York State Health Benefits Exchange,” said Siobhan Dennehy, executive director of Emerald Isle Immigration Services. “It is critically important that we all continue to work toward ending health care disparities which take such toll on the health of uninsured immigrants. We see hope that there will be no fear or confusion when uninsured immigrants seek health care under the NY State Health Benefits Exchange.”

The report made several key recommendations, including:

  • Shape the State’s definition of “lawfully present” to ensure the broadest possible inclusion of immigrants under the ACA. Currently, immigration definitions and eligibility for public benefits vary by program.
  • Develop mechanisms for verifying citizenship and immigration status while protecting confidentiality and due process. Enrollment into public insurance programs and the exchange will require verification and documentation of status. The State can streamline the verification requirements under ACA with existing programs while maintaining privacy.
  • Conduct tailored, active outreach and marketing to engage immigrants and enroll them in health insurance coverage programs. Given the tremendous racial, ethnic, cultural, and language diversity of the State’s residents, a range of tailored approaches to outreach and enrollment activities will be needed to meet the unique needs of multiple immigrant communities.
  • Secure the safety net and charity care programs. Undocumented immigrants and some others will remain uninsured even after health reform is implemented, so the safety-net system of care will remain important to New York State’s health care infrastructure.

Copies of the report are available by clicking HERE and upon request.

# # #

The New York Immigration Coalition is an umbrella policy and advocacy organization for nearly 200 groups in New York State that work with immigrants and refugees. The NYIC aims to achieve a fairer and more just society that values the contributions of immigrants and extends opportunity to all by promoting immigrants’ full civic participation, fosters their leadership, and provides a unified voice and a vehicle for collective action for New York’s diverse immigrant communities.

The New York State Health Foundation (NYSHealth) is a private, statewide foundation dedicated to improving the health of all New Yorkers, especially the most vulnerable. Today, NYSHealth concentrates its work in three strategic priority areas: expanding health care coverage; improving diabetes prevention; and advancing primary care. The Foundation is committed to making grants, informing health care policy and practice, spreading effective programs to improve the health system, serving as a neutral convener of health leaders across the State, and providing technical assistance to our grantees and partners.

Empire Justice Center is a statewide, multi-issue, multi-strategy public interest law firm focused on changing the “systems” within which poor and low income families live. With a focus on poverty law, Empire Justice undertakes research and training, acts as an informational clearinghouse, and provides litigation backup to local legal services programs and community based organizations.  As an advocacy organization, we engage in legislative and administrative advocacy on behalf of those impacted by poverty and discrimination.  As a non-profit law firm, we provide legal assistance to those in need and undertake impact litigation in order to protect and defend the rights of disenfranchised New Yorkers.

AALDEF Spring 2013 Internships

As seen on the AALDEF website:

SPRING 2013 INTERNSHIPS

Date posted: November 19, 2012
Experience level: For Undergraduate, Graduate, and Law Students

Spring internships are available for the following program areas (open to all unless otherwise noted):

AALDEF Fundraising Events: provide administrative support in preparation for AALDEF’s annual gala. Computer experience with databases, graphics, and web programs are helpful. **Undergraduate students ONLY.  Workstudy grants accepted.**

Anti-Trafficking Initiative: Legal research and writing, organizing/outreach, and legal advocacy for trafficked clients pursuant to the Trafficking Victims Protection Act and other related legislation. Fluency in Indonesian, Hindi, or Bangla highly preferred. **Law students ONLY. **

Economic Justice for Workers: Provide legal advocacy, direct representation, and community education on behalf of Asian immigrant workers experiencing wage-and-hour, retaliation, and workplace safety violations in the restaurant, beauty/nail salon, and domestic worker industries, among others. Undergraduate interns will perform research and community outreach. Fluency in a second language is highly preferred.

Educational Equity and Youth Rights: legal services, policy work, community education, research, and litigation concerning educational equity, juvenile justice, language access, student free-speech and police surveillance, and anti-Asian harassment.

Housing and Environmental Justice: community outreach/education, research, and litigation on gentrification and other land use issues affecting low-income and Asian immigrant communities.

Immigrant Access to Justice: litigation, legal services, and organizing/outreach with communities impacted by 9-11 immigration and law enforcement policies. An additional emphasis on Asian communities’ access to representation and education about immigration policies and practices that may impact them including unconstitutional DHS stops, new deferred action policies for youth, and secured communities.

Voting Rights: legal research and fact development under the Voting Rights Act and Equal Protection Clause challenging anti-Asian voter discrimination, advocacy on bilingual ballots, and the redrawing of local, state, and federal district lines; produce reports and organize public forums; assist in organizing legal trainings.  

Description of Internships:
Interns are supervised by attorneys and/or AALDEF staff in specific program areas. These internships are not paid positions, but academic credit can be arranged. Interns work anywhere between 8 to 25 hours per week.  Internships usually commence with the start of classes (end of January) through late April/early May.

To Apply:
Any bilingual ability should be stated in the resume. Bilingual ability is helpful but not required. Applications should also state the number of hours the intern is able to work per week and which program area(s) you are interested in. Email applications are accepted. 

Deadline is December 3, 2012. Applications received after deadline will be considered on a rolling basis. Send a resume and cover letter (law students should include a writing sample) to:

AALDEF Spring Intern Search
Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund (AALDEF)
99 Hudson Street, 12th floor,
New York, New York 10013-2815

Fax: 212-966-4303 or Email: info@aaldef.org

For more information, contact Jennifer Weng at 212-966-5932, ext. 212 or jweng@aaldef.org.