STATEMENT FROM THE MINKWON CENTER REGARDING THE NEWLY SIGNED TRAVEL BAN EXECUTIVE ORDER

Flushing, New York – On March 6, 2017, the President signed an executive order that bans immigration from six Muslim-majority countries and suspends the United States’ refugee program. This order revises and replaces an order signed on January 27 that suffered numerous defeats at the courts, culminating in a total injunction against the order from the 9th Circuit.

The President is turning his inflammatory rhetoric and hate into federal policy, and this intensely divisive climate has already had devastating consequences. This weekend, a Sikh man was shot in Washington. The week before, Srinivas Kuchibhotla was shot and killed in Kansas. Both shootings are believed to be racially motivated.

The new executive order runs counter to the MinKwon Center’s mission and values, and James Hong, Interim Executive Director, released the following statement:

“These executive orders can be revised a thousand more times, but the intent has always been clear. The travel ban has never been about public safety. Rather, the Trump administration is using xenophobia and Islamophobia to divide the nation, discriminate against immigrants based on religion, and ignore a growing humanitarian refugee crisis. Since its founding in 1984, the Minkwon Center for Community Action has worked to improve the lives of our immigrant communities, and as such, we continue to strongly oppose the Trump administration’s draconian policies designed to shut the doors on immigrants. We are proud to stand with our South Asian and Muslim allies against these hateful measures.”

For more information, contact:
James Hong

718.460.5600
james.hong@minkwon.org

NAPABA and SABA Condemn the President’s Second Attempt to Exclude Refugees and Implement a Muslim Ban

WASHINGTON — The National Asian Pacific American Bar Association (NAPABA) and the South Asian Bar Association of North America (SABA) condemn President Trump’s new executive order that includes many of the discriminatory provisions of his earlier order, which also sought to stop refugees from entering the United States and halt immigration from several Muslim-majority countries. These orders, which are based on the misguided idea that certain religious and ethnic populations are more prone to violence, are incompatible with American values, and will not make our communities safer or our nation stronger. Notably, the order, continues to 1) suspend refugee admission for 120 days, 2) reduce and limit the number of refugee admissions, and 3) targets individuals from six Muslim-majority countries, suspending entry of individuals for 90 days, with some exceptions.

“The executive order is a continuation of the same policy that discriminates against and devalues refugees and members of the Muslim community,” said NAPABA President Cyndie Chang. “We must refuse to act out of fear and intolerance. We must not return to the dark chapters of our history where we judged people by the color of their skin, how they prayed, or where their family came from. We must stand up for our values of equity, justice, and opportunity.”

“The President’s Executive Action does nothing more than advance an anti-Muslim agenda espoused during the campaign under the guise of National Security,” said SABA President Vichal Kumar. “A refugee, by definition, is a person who has been forced to leave their country in order to escape war, persecution, or natural disaster. The supposed justification for this Executive Action punishes this person for the very same war and persecution that is causing them to leave in the first place.”

The new executive order clarifies it is not applicable to certain individuals, such as valid visa holders whose documents were issued on or before Jan. 27, 2017, lawful permanent residents, and dual-national passport holders. The order will take effect on March 16, 2017.

The executive order continues to require regular reports be published on suspected criminal activity committed by foreign nationals and refugees. When combined with reporting requirements under other immigration related executive orders, these reports will generate greater mistrust and fear of immigrant communities.

Both NAPABA and SABA joined litigation against the executive order enacted on Jan. 27, 2017. Our members have been at the airports assisting families, in the field educating communities about their rights, and in the courts supporting local and national pro bono efforts. Read our original statement here.

NAPABA and SABA join our fellow attorneys, the Asian Pacific American community, and Americans of all backgrounds in reiterating our commitment to diversity and justice. We remain committed to ensuring that all are free from discrimination and racial and religious profiling.

For more information, contact:


NAPABA is the national association of Asian Pacific American attorneys, judges, law professors, and law students. NAPABA represents the interests of over 50,000 attorneys and over 75 national, state, and local bar associations. Its members include solo practitioners, large firm lawyers, corporate counsel, legal services and non-profit attorneys, and lawyers serving at all levels of government. NAPABA engages in legislative and policy advocacy, promotes APA political leadership and political appointments, and builds coalitions within the legal profession and the community at large. NAPABA also serves as a resource for government agencies, members of Congress, and public service organizations about APAs in the legal profession, civil rights, and diversity in the courts.

SABA North America (formerly NASABA/North American South Asian Bar Association) is a voluntary bar organization and serves as an umbrella organization to 26 chapters in the United States and Canada. SABA North America is a recognized forum for professional growth and advancement for South Asian attorneys in North America and seeks to protect the rights and liberties of the South Asian community across the continent. Learn more at www.sabanorthamerica.com.

AAARI-CUNY Lecture Series: We Too Sing America

From the Asian American / Asian Research Institute (AAARI) at the City University of New York (CUNY):

Please join us for a talk on, We Too Sing America – Deepa
Iyer in Conversation with Zohra Saed, on Friday, March 18, 2016, from 6pm to
8pm, at 25 West 43rd Street, 10th Floor, Room 1000, between 5th & 6th
Avenues, Manhattan. This talk is free and open to the general public.

Author and nationally renowned activist Deepa Iyer, in
conversation with Brooklyn based Afghan American poet Zohra Saed, will discuss
her book We Too Sing America: South Asian, Arab, Muslim, and Sikh Immigrants
Shape Our Multiracial Future.

Many of us can recall the targeting of South Asian, Arab,
Muslim, and Sikh people in the wake of 9/11. We may be less aware, however, of
the ongoing racism directed against these groups in the past decade and a half.
In We Too Sing America, Deepa Iyer catalogs recent racial flash points, from
the 2012 massacre at the Sikh gurdwara in Oak Creek, Wisconsin, to the violent
opposition to the Islamic Center of Murfreesboro, Tennessee, and to the Park 51
Community Center in Lower Manhattan.

Iyer asks whether hate crimes should be considered domestic
terrorism and explores the role of the state in perpetuating racism through
detentions, national registration programs, police profiling, and constant
surveillance. She looks at topics including Islamophobia in the Bible Belt; the
“Bermuda Triangle” of anti-immigrant, anti-Muslim hysteria; and the
energy of new reform movements, including those of “undocumented and
unafraid” youth and Black Lives Matter.

Deepa Iyer is an activist, writer, and lawyer with a strong
commitment to intersectional, community-based, racial justice issues in the
United States. The former Executive Director of South Asian Americans Leading
Together (SAALT), Deepa is currently the Senior Fellow at the Center for Social
Inclusion where she provides analysis, commentary and scholarship on how to
build equity and solidarity in America’s changing racial landscape.

Zohra Saed is a Brooklyn based Afghan American poet. Her
poetry and essays have been published in numerous anthologies and journals.
Zohra is a doctoral candidate at The City University of New York Graduate
Center. As a Lecturer, she initiated the following courses at Hunter College:
Arab American Literature; West Asian American Literature and Film; and Central
Asian Film and Literature.

To RSVP for this talk, please visit
www.aaari.info/16-03-18Iyer.htm. Please be prepared to present proper
identification when entering the building lobby.

If you are unable to attend the talk, it will be live
webcasted on our website, www.aaari.info,
beginning 6:15PM EST, and also available the following week as streaming
video and audio podcast. See you on Friday!

ORGANIZATIONAL STATEMENT: NAPABA Stands Up Against Anti-Muslim Hate and Bigotry

Today,
NAPABA will convene with members of the Asian Pacific American
community at the National Japanese American Memorial to stand in
solidarity with the Muslim, Sikh, Arab, and South Asian American
communities. This rally is in response to anti-Muslim hate and rhetoric
that has increased following recent terrorist attacks.

Below is NAPABA’s organizational statement:

The
National Asian Pacific American Bar Association (NAPABA) — together
with 34 fellow member organizations of the National Council of Asian
Pacific Americans — stands with its members and in solidarity with all
Arab, Muslim, Sikh, and South Asian American communities to oppose
anti-Muslim hate, bigotry, and xenophobia and calls on the American
people and allied groups to do the same.

Fourteen years ago, NAPABA came together with members of the Asian
Pacific American (APA) community to denounce anti-Muslim hate and
violence in the days following the 9/11 attacks. Sadly, a resurgence of
that same kind of hate and xenophobia has prompted the APA community and
NAPABA to again speak out against anti-Muslim sentiment.

In recent weeks and months, hate crimes committed against Muslim
Americans and those perceived to be Muslim have increased at an alarming
and unprecedented rate. Since the Paris attacks, there has been an
average of two attacks against Muslims every day in the U.S.

Xenophobic and divisive rhetoric from political candidates, elected
officials, and other public figures have helped to promote an
environment of fear, suspicion, and hatred for Muslims in America. This
fear and suspicion has led to unfounded and unfair targeting of Muslims
and individuals perceived to be Muslim engaging in unthreatening
behavior — such as speaking Arabic at an airport, wearing a turban to a
football game, or simply having black or brown skin — which can
normalize anti-Muslim violence and threats and make them more likely to
occur.

Recent terror attacks — including those in Paris and San Bernadino — are
no excuse for violence or prejudice against the Arab, Muslim, Sikh, and
South Asian Americans, who are contributing and valuable members of
NAPABA and our nation. We must refuse to be guided by stereotypes, fear,
and mistrust. We must stand up against anti-Muslim hate, bigotry, and
xenophobia and help make this country a better place for all of us.

NAPABA encourages its members and affiliates to show solidarity with the Arab, Muslim, Sikh, and South Asian American communities. We
hope that you will be the voices of tolerance through your actions to
support your neighbors, respond to acts of hate, and denounce rhetoric
that encourages discrimination and profiling. We encourage you to look for community-based resources and campaigns to become strong partners and advocates in this effort to denounce anti-Muslim hate.

Penn MLSA Seventh Annual Muslim Law Conference

The University of Pennsylvania Muslim Law Students Association (Penn MLSA) will host its Seventh Annual Muslim Law Conference on February 16, 2013.  Legal employers interested in recruiting diverse applicants are encouraged to join in this event. Please click here to download a copy of the flyer.

Penn MLSA organizes this conference each year for the dual purpose of assisting Muslim law students entering the legal field and educating the broader community about legal issues pertaining to the Muslim community.  This year’s gathering will include speeches from prominent attorneys involved in issues pertaining to the Muslim community at the local, state, and national levels.  Supported by the national branch of Muslim Law Students Association, attendants will range from university leadership to legal experts, practitioners, and policy advocates from around the country.

The conference will also include a career fair for students. As of now, Penn MLSA is looking for employers who would like to attend and offer information to prospective interns.  Organizations and employers interested in attending can contact Haider Sultan, President of Penn MLSA, at (860) 918-6560 or Haidersultan.7735@gmail.com