In the News: Board Director Chris Kwok Interviewed on The Debrief

On June 11, AABANY Board Director Chris Kwok was interviewed by Erica Byfield on News 4 The Debrief podcast for an episode titled “Anti-Asian Attacks and Relations With the Black Community.” In the episode, they talked about the ongoing hate and violence against Asian Americans across the United States and the longstanding history of society’s treatment of non-whites in America. Chris spoke about how fighting anti-Asian violence is connected to the Black Lives Matter and Me Too Movements because people are fighting for the same things—an equal, just society and an equal chance to be human. However, at the same time, people need to understand how race operates differently between Asian Americans, African Americans, and Latino Americans. Chris states, “Having these conversations in public, honestly, with people who know what they’re talking about, and who are sensitive to these topics, empathetic to people’s experiences, knowledgeable about our histories, about how they are intertwined, how they can be used against us, how we can then turn it around and use it for good. If we‘re able to sort of look at it square in the face is, I think, the way forward. There’s no other way.” In addition, Chris discussed the importance of following up with District Attorney’s Offices in New York City to ensure that hate crimes are addressed and perpetrators are held accountable. To listen to the full podcast, click here.

AABANY’s report on anti-Asian violence was also recently cited in a June 15 Indonesian article on alinea.id about the naming of viruses and diseases including Covid-19. The article discusses the increase of discrimination against Asian Americans in the U.S. after the widespread labeling of Covid-19 as the “Wuhan virus” and “Chinese virus” by former U.S. President Trump.

Please also take a look at previous blog posts from February 19, March 1, March 8, March 15, March 29, May 10, and May 17 highlighting news stories about our report. If you have come across a news report or article about our report that is not listed above, please let us know at main@aabany.org.

More public awareness about our report and the rise in anti-Asian violence is needed. Please share our report widely. If you have ideas or thoughts about how we can combat anti-Asian violence, please share them with us at main@aabany.org.

AABANY Co-Sponsors a CLE Program about Anti-Asian Violence and Steps Lawyers Can Take to Combat the Issue on May 26

On May 26, the Asian American Bar Association of New York (AABANY), along with the New York City Bar Association (NYCBA) and the New York State Bar Association (NYSBA), hosted a CLE program about the rise in anti-Asian violence during the past year. Karen King, AABANY Pro Bono & Community Service (PBCS) Committee Co-Chair welcomed the attendees. Bret Parker, the Executive Director of the New York City Bar Association introduced the program and gave his thanks to the organizers of the event as well. Karen Kithan Yau, AABANY Board Director and the moderator for the event, introduced the program’s panelists: PBCS Committee Co-Chair and Morvillo Abramowitz Partner Karen King; AABANY Board Director, Issues Committee Co-Chair, Asia Practice Committee Co-Chair and JAMS Mediator Chris Kwok; Girls Rule the Law founder Mirna Santiago; Kings County DA Office Bureau Chief Kin Ng; and Legal Aid Society Cop Accountability Project attorney Jennvine Wong.

Karen King and Chris began the presentation for the event. Karen first discussed the origins of anti-Asian racism during the COVID-19 pandemic, explaining that anti-Asian bias incidents began very early on in the pandemic. The number of incidents only tapered off due to the stay-at-home orders, before increasing once again after President Trump’s inflammatory statements blaming Asians for the outbreak. Chris also pointed out that the New York Police Department (NYPD) often neglected to fully investigate the earliest occurrences of anti-Asian hate, regarding them as minor incidents. He also presented a brief history of anti-Asian violence, beginning with the Chinese massacre of 1871 which immunized violence against Asians and ending with the Vincent Chin case. Karen then discussed the causes of the violence against Asians. She explained that societal stress, inaccurate information, underreporting, lack of cultural awareness of the discrimination that Asians face, and prosecution’s tendency to not pursue hate crime enhancements all contributed to the increase in anti-Asian incidents. Chris also noted that the NYPD Asian Hate Crimes Task Force not only lacks funding, but that its members are already assigned to other departments in the NYPD and serve on the Task Force on a volunteer basis. The Black Lives Matter and the Defund the Police movements also eclipsed the issue of anti-Asian violence through the end of 2020. Karen explained that AABANY’s report on anti-Asian violence was written to document this issue and keep it in the public eye.

After the presentation, Karen Yau opened the conversation to the rest of the panelists. She began by addressing Mirna, asking her what it meant to be an ally. Mirna explained that the feeling of “otherness” is something that all minority groups face. She also emphasized the need to break away from tit-for-tat allyship and to build a trans-racial coalition united to fight against racism and hate.

Karen then turned to Kin and asked about the reasons why any hate crimes had yet to be successfully prosecuted. Kin explained that unlike other crimes, law enforcement must not only prove that the perpetrator committed the crime, but also must prove that the perpetrator was motivated by racist sentiments. This process is often lengthy and requires a great deal of investigation. Kin also pointed out that acquiring evidence of hate speech can be prevented by the victim’s inability to understand English. He acknowledged how frustrating the process was, but also encouraged the attendees to report any incidents, as establishing a pattern aids the prosecution of hate crimes.

Karen then followed up by asking how prosecutors dealt with the difficulties of investigating hate crimes. Kin explained that establishing trust between the District Attorney’s Office and people in the community is instrumental in acquiring evidence. He also pointed out that more funding and employing more bilingual individuals to act as a liaison between the DA’s Office and the community would aid prosecution immensely.

Karen then turned to the issue of over-incarceration. Addressing Jennvine, Karen asked her thoughts about combating anti-Asian incidents without turning to incarceration. Jennvine acknowledged the issue, emphasizing how hate crime enhancements disproportionately affect other minorities who are already overrepresented in the prison system. She also asserted that criminalization would obscure the root cause of the violence, white supremacy. Rather than buy into the media’s false narrative of blacks versus Asians, Jennvine explained that many Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) are subjected to violence because they are trapped in poverty and living in unsafe neighborhoods. Jennvine concluded by contending that turning to the NYPD would not offer a viable long-term solution.

Karen then returned to Kin, asking if the new discovery laws had any effect on the prosecution of hate crimes. Kin explained that the new laws would allow the alleged perpetrator’s defense attorney to call witnesses in their homes because the defense is entitled to interview witnesses. This change has resulted in some individuals being less willing to testify, making underreporting more severe.

Karen then moved the conversation to bail reform. She described one incident where, due to the pandemic, the alleged perpetrator of a bias incident was not put on trial and walked free without an order of protection for the alleged victim for several months before going to court. Jennvine responded by emphasizing the importance of bail reform and how previous bail laws only gave victims a false sense of security. She also pointed out that orders of protection are typically granted and also tend to only give protection in name. Kin also noted that the large gap between the report of the incident and the court date was due to the extraordinary circumstances caused by the pandemic. The absence of an order of protection was due to the lack of a court hearing until the later date.

Karen then addressed Chris, asking about his experiences in speaking with the media. Chris explained that when the report was published in February of 2021, mass media was not aware of the basic facts about anti-Asian violence. When the media coverage began to recede in March, the Atlanta shootings gave new gravity to the situation, though much of the nuance about the issue was lost in the popular narrative which pits blacks against Asians. Nonetheless, Chris also noted that the attention Asians have received in the media is unprecedented.

Karen then turned back to Mirna, asking to what degree the conflict between Asians and blacks is real. Mirna emphasized the need to educate others and to reconsider our own bias when being an ally. She also highlighted Grace Lee Boggs, an Asian woman who was extremely active in the fight for black civil rights in the 1960s. She closed by reiterating the need for listening and empathy across communities.

Karen then inquired about the importance of symbols, such as swastikas, in prosecuting hate crimes. Kin responded that since Asian cultures are extremely diverse, finding a single symbol that could be employed as a hate symbol against Asians would be difficult. Kin also reiterated that the police’s ability to prove a connection between race and the crime depends largely on the amount of effort the police are willing to put into the investigation.

Karen’s final question was about the possibility of a program where alleged perpetrators could receive counseling from victims. Karen King disagreed, questioning its practicality, but supported counseling perpetrators. Mirna concurred, stating that it should never be the burden of the victims to help their perpetrators. Chris also emphasized the importance of education and cultural competency in combating racism and building solidarity.

Kin and Chris then closed the panel discussion by reemphasizing the need for reporting incidents, as the issue of anti-Asian violence would remain invisible unless victims and witnesses stepped forward to bring the issue into the spotlight.

The President of the NYSBA, Scott Karson, concluded the event by thanking the organizers, panelists, and attendees for participating in the event, and reiterated NYSBA’s solidarity with the Asian community. Karen Yau also encouraged attendees to volunteer for AABANY’s Hate Eradication Active Response Team (HEART), an initiative which would allow volunteers to connect community members who had experienced a bias incident with legal and mental health resources.

To learn more about the HEART initiative click here. To view the full video of the program, click here.

AABANY AAVTF Holds a Briefing on Anti-Asian Violence on May 25

On May 25, the Asian American Bar Association of New York’s Anti-Asian Violence Task Force (AAVTF) hosted an information briefing about the AAVTF’s activities and about the rise in anti-Asian violence during the COVID-19 pandemic. The speakers for the event were AABANY President Terry Shen; Board Director, Issues Committee Co-Chair and Asia Practice Committee Co-Chair Chris Kwok; Board Director and past Pro Bono & Community Service (PBCS) Committee Co-Chair Karen Yau; PBCS Committee Co-Chair Karen King; Prosecutors’ Committee Co-Chair Joseb Gim; and Executive Director Yang Chen.

Chris and President Shen gave the opening remarks, introducing the event, and thanking all the attendees for coming.

After these remarks, Chris began the presentation, explaining how the publicity about anti-Asian violence generated in mainstream media has suddenly catapulted Asian American and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) into the public consciousness. Unlike before, Asians are now viewed as a group that experiences discrimination and violence, just like any other minority. Chris explained that these realizations politically empower AAPIs to make change in the political system as Asians become more aware about race and the ways in which it affects them. The AAPI identity has also been recreated through artwork, publications, and other initiatives. Asian non-profits have also begun receiving a large influx of donations that have great potential to aid the AAPI community. Chris also discussed the history of AABANY’s report and how Trump’s inflammatory rhetoric about the virus incited a wave of anti-Asian hate and violence during early 2020. These events culminated in the report’s publication in February 2021. Karen then discussed the report’s publication process which involved the feedback and support of bar associations, law firms and other organizations. The subsequent publicity generated by the report was cemented by the anti-Asian shootings in Atlanta. Ever since, Karen explained, AABANY has frequently been requested to speak at numerous events and on many media outlets. Many initiatives proposed by the report have also since been implemented.

Yang then went on to discuss the genesis of the AAVTF, made up of members of the Academic Committee, Issues Committee, Legal Referral and Information Services (LRIS) Committee, PBCS Committee, Prosecutors Committee, and Student Outreach Committee as well as Immediate Past President Sapna Palla, President Shen, and President-Elect Will Ng. Yang also explained how the AAVTF was founded to realize the goals outlined in the report, focusing on three prongs of action: education/communication, research, and advocacy. Ever since, the AAVTF has pressed for hate crime prosecutions in DA Offices, published Know Your Rights Brochures for community members on what to do if they face an anti-Asian bias incident or hate crime, organized speaking engagements, begun data tracking for incidents, formed the Hate Eradication Active Response Team (HEART), and much more to raise awareness and combat anti-Asian violence.

Joe Gim, prosecutor and the Chief of the new Hate Crimes Bureau at the Nassau County DA Office next discussed the role of the Prosecutors’ Committee in the AAVTF, which was primarily to shed light on criminal statutes and on the gaps between law enforcement’s understanding and implementation of these statutes. This information, Joe explained, is used to strengthen AABANY’s initiatives and advocacy efforts.

Chris affirmed this statement, reiterating his thanks to the AAVTF and the indispensable support it provides in leading the conversation about anti-Asian violence. Chris also pointed out that any movements that fight back against hate, regardless of which group is targeted, are fighting against a common enemy of structural racism.

Yang and Karen Yau went on to promote the Turning the Tide (T3) Project, which is hosted at the Asian American Law Fund of New York (AALFNY) to raise money for the AAVTF’s initiatives, research, and advocacy combating anti-Asian hate and violence. Karen King also gave a special shoutout to the HEART initiative, encouraging the attendees to volunteer their time to help connect victims of anti-Asian violence with legal aid and other resources. She also encouraged attendees to involve their law firms as sponsors for projects and events.

Chris then closed the presentation by pointing out how the police’s lackluster response to hate crimes is in part due to the historical invisibility of the AAPI community. He also explained how this invisibility has its roots in the 1853 People v. Hall case where George Hall, a white man, was convicted but then released after murdering a Chinese miner. Chris explained how Hall appealed his release on the basis of a California statute which prevented people of color from testifying against whites. Chris also emphasized that supporting the Black Lives Matter movement does not detract from support for the AAPI cause. To illustrate the importance of building a multi-racial coalition, Chris recounted an interview he had with the celebrated documentary director Spike Lee for his film about New York City and race that will be released in September 2021. Lee explained that he had chosen to interview Chris because “people were asking where the Asians were. And I listened.”

After the presentations, the discussion was opened to the attendees for a question and answer session. 

Karen Lin, PBCS Committee Co-Chair asked whether or not AABANY would advocate for including AAPI history in the public school curriculum. Yang answered by reiterating AABANY’s support of any educational initiatives, pointing to AABANY’s trial reenactments project as an example. 

AABANY member Jennifer Luo then pointed the discussion towards the lack of successful hate crime prosecutions. Joe explained that law enforcement currently lacks sufficient resources and infrastructure to investigate hate crimes. As hate crimes are unique in that the prosecutor must prove that the perpetrator was motivated to commit the crime due to racial bias, this process requires more investigation and information which the police currently lacks. To address this issue, Joe also proposed creating a database of hate crimes and bias incidents that would allow law enforcement to easily access information and also to enable community members to report incidents more efficiently. He also mentioned the newly minted COVID-19 Hate Crimes Act, which would allocate funding towards combating hate crimes. Chris also added that AABANY is planning a Candidates’ Forum that would give AABANY and its members an opportunity to ask about measures being considered to protect the AAPI community from violence. 

David Ahn then asked about AABANY’s plans to monitor hate crimes going forward. Chris answered by citing AABANY’s involvement in a case in Flushing, Queens where the perpetrator, despite revealing his racist sentiments in a text sent to the New York Times, was not charged with a hate crime. After AABANY’s advocacy in the DA’s Office, the perpetrator was charged with a hate crime. Chris also added that, though not every case would lead to a hate crime enhancement, AABANY is continuing to monitor the news and other outlets for advocacy opportunities. Yang also explained that the HEART initiative would help AABANY keep track of the incidents, connect with the community, and improve AABANY’s advocacy efforts. Karen Yau also pointed out that there are other alternatives to criminal prosecutions that victims would be able to pursue if they wished.

Chris then shared his own experiences with anti-Asian violence growing up, recounting a story where his friends were assaulted by a white supremacist gang while exiting a movie theater in Queens. He also described his efforts to reconnect with them hoping to preserve their stories and voices as a part of the history of anti-Asian violence.

AABANY Treasurer William Hao also discussed his own involvement in the aftermath of the Atlanta shootings while on a call with former U.S. Attorney Byung J. (“BJay”) Pak, the FBI, and local law enforcement. Will shared that even though the media had severely twisted the narrative by promoting the perpetrator’s claim that he had not been motivated by racism, the call served to give Asians a voice in revealing the truth of the events and reshaping the story. Will concluded by emphasizing the importance of AAPI representation in government and law enforcement.

Marilyn Go (USMJ EDNY, ret’d) then asked about AABANY’s ability to speak out during majority political forums. Chris answered by pointing out the difficulty of entering majority forums, but also noted that events recorded on Zoom would allow AABANY to hold candidates accountable for their words. Yang also referenced the City Council District One Candidates’ Forum which did take questions from AABANY regarding the NYPD Hate Crimes Task Force. Jennifer then asked about the possibility of keeping a record of candidates’ responses regarding issues of anti-Asian violence. Chris responded that AABANY’s future plans to hold a Manhattan DA Candidates’ forum would allow AABANY to record responses from the candidates on that issue.

AABANY thanks all of the attendees for their time and their commitment to serving the AAPI community. To view the recording of the event, click here.

NAPABA Statement on DOJ’s Guidance on Improving the Department’s Efforts to Combat Hate Crimes and Hate Incidents

For Immediate Release: Date: May 27, 2021

Contact: Priya Purandare, Executive Director

WASHINGTON – Today, Attorney General Merrick Garland issued guidance to the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) on “Improving the Department’s Efforts to Combat Hate Crimes and Hate Incidents.”  The guidance implements the DOJ’s obligations under the newly enacted COVID-19 Hate Crimes law.

As part of today’s announcement, Attorney General Garland stated that the DOJ will, amongst other activities:

  • Designate the Chief of the Civil Rights Division’s Criminal Section to expedite review of hate crimes allegations brought to light during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Appoint a Deputy Associate Attorney General to serve as coordinator for DOJ’s anti-hate crime and hate incident resources.  That coordinator will also be a central hub for law enforcement and community stakeholders on relevant training and outreach materials. 
  • Encourage all U.S. Attorneys Offices to designate both a criminal and civil Assistant U.S. Attorney to serve as Civil Rights Coordinators in every judicial district.
  • Create district alliances of between federal, state, and local law enforcement, against hate, where feasible.
  • Establish a position of Language Access Coordinator for the Department. 

NAPABA is already working in several of these areas. NAPABA has, in partnership with APIA Health Forum, created Combat Hate Crimes Toolkits in 25 different AA NHPI languages on how to identify and report hate crimes.

Language equity and access has been a priority of NAPABA for decades.  NAPABA encourages the Coordinator to draw on NAPABA’s Language Access Project and its groundbreaking report on linguistic equity for Asian Pacific Americans navigating the justice system.

To report a hate crime, contact local law enforcement or your nearest FBI field office, or visit: https://www.napaba.org/page/ReportaHateCrime

###

The National Asian Pacific American Bar Association (NAPABA) in the largest Asian Pacific American membership organization representing the interests of approximately 50,000 legal professionals and nearly 90 national, state, and local Asian Pacific American bar associations. NAPABA is a leader in addressing civil rights issues confronting Asian Pacific American communities. Through its national network, NAPABA provides a strong voice for increased diversity of the federal and state judiciaries, advocates for equal opportunity in the workplace, works to eliminate hate crimes and anti-immigrant sentiment, and promotes the professional development of people of color in the legal profession.

AABANY SOC Co-Chair Dianna Lam Featured in Fordham Law News on Her Experience of Parenting while Attending Law School

On May 21, Dianna Lam, AABANY Student Outreach Committee (SOC) Co-Chair and Student Leader was featured in an article published in Fordham Law News. Writer Suzi Morales interviewed Fordham Law School evening students about the struggles of being a parent, working individual, and law student at the same time. In the interview, Dianna, mother of two boys, explained that prior to the pandemic, she would work and take care of her sons during the daytime while she would study during her lunch breaks and in the evening. As a result, Dianna explained that it was difficult for her sons to understand her work and her busy life. Now with remote learning in full swing, she has been able to involve herself in other extracurricular activities such as AABANY SOC and Fordham’s Evening Division Society. In the article, Dianna also noted that because of at-home learning she has also had much more time to spend with her sons who are an inspiration for her while she works. As Dianna joked, “Sometimes, when [my sons are] playing games with their friends, I hear them saying things that I would say to them, like, ‘In a meeting right now.’” To read the full article, click here.

Please join AABANY in congratulating Dianna on appearing in Fordham Law News. We appreciate all your hard work for AABANY, on top of everything else you need to get done!

To learn more about the Student Outreach Committee, click here. To read more about AABANY’s Student Leaders click here.

In The News: President Terry Shen and Past President Linda Lin’s Op-Ed on the Lack of Asian-American Representation in New York’s Courts Published in City & State

On May 20, 2021, City & State published an Op-Ed written by President Terry Shen and Past President Linda Lin of the Asian American Bar Association of New York.

In the Op-Ed, President Shen and Past President Lin describe how a wave of Anti-Asian violence swept across New York City in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic and how the city government’s lackluster response to these incidents has not been enough to protect the AAPI community. According to the article, stronger Asian-American representation in New York’s courts can help to solve these issues. The article also highlights Kathy Hirata Chin, the only Asian-American candidate for the New York Court of Appeals, arguing that her appointment would be a landmark step towards greater racial diversity, justice, and equity. As stated by President Shen and Past President Lin: “Our government must be diverse to fulfill Lincoln’s vision of a nation ‘of the people, by the people, and for the people.’ The need in our city and state is urgent and necessary.”

To read the full article, click here.

Pro Bono Committee Vice Chair Olympia Moy’s Wedding Story Featured in The New York Times

AABANY Pro Bono and Community Service Committee Vice Chair Olympia Moy and her partner Elizabeth Ingriselli’s wedding story was featured in an April 9, 2021 article in The New York Times titled “They Didn’t Need a Dating App After All.” 

Their story began in 2016 when Olympia came across Elizabeth’s profile on the dating app Coffee Meets Bagel and became intrigued by their similar interests. Both of them had graduated from Princeton and both were interested in pursuing a career in law. Weeks later, after Olympia received no response to the “like” she left on Elizabeth’s profile, they both happened to attend the same Pride Month mixer in Manhattan. Instead of avoiding Elizabeth, Olympia struck a conversation with her and learned that Elizabeth had not rejected her on the dating app, but rather had not seen the “like.” They quickly became friends and after a few months of meeting, they went on their first date. On March 7, 2021, Olympia and Elizabeth held a small wedding ceremony at an outdoor dining structure in Chinatown within the Covid-19 guidelines. They plan to hold a second, larger celebration at the Princeton University Chapel next year. 

Please join AABANY in congratulating Olympia and Elizabeth on their marriage! To read their full wedding story, please click here.

In the News: Board Director Chris Kwok Interviewed by ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

AABANY’s report on anti-Asian violence was recently mentioned in a May 6, 2021 ABC News article titled “Asian Americans take a stand as the US faces a new racial reckoning.” The article highlighted the report’s finding of the eight-fold increase in the number of anti-Asian hate incidents that were reported to the NYPD in 2020 compared to the previous year. Co-Executive Editor of the report and AABANY Board Director Chris Kwok was interviewed on the underreporting of anti-Asian hate incidents and the increase of anti-Asian hate and violence during the pandemic. Chris discussed the long-standing anti-Asian sentiments in America which date back to laws in the 19th and early 20th centuries controlling the rights of Chinese workers. He stated: “The pandemic unleashed, I think, a growing fear of China going back to [Barack] Obama’s second term…Then if you take the thread back longer in the West, in America, there’s always been a fear of Chinese in America.” Chris also mentioned how former President Donald Trump’s reference to COVID-19 as the “China virus” and “Kung Flu” fueled anti-Asian sentiment during the pandemic, providing perpetrators “the ultimate authorisation to behave to the worst impulses that you had.” 

To read the full article, click here.

Please also take a look at previous blog posts from February 19March 1March 8March 15March 29, and May 10 highlighting news stories about our report. If you have come across a news report or article about our report that is not listed above, please let us know at main@aabany.org.

More public awareness about our report and the rise in anti-Asian violence is needed. Please share our report widely. If you have ideas or thoughts about how we can combat anti-Asian violence, please share them with us at main@aabany.org.

NAPABA Partners With Asian & Pacific Islander American Health Forum to Address COVID-19 Through CDC Grant Funding Opportunity

For Immediate Release:        

Date: April 27, 2021

Contact: Priya Purandare, Executive Director

WASHINGTON – NAPABA is proud to announce that the Asian & Pacific Islander American Health Forum (APIAHF) has awarded it grant funding under the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Engaging AANHPI Communities in Adult Vaccination (EVAC) program. Under this award, the first received in its history, NAPABA will leverage its nationwide network of nearly 90 affiliate organizations and its expertise at the intersection of language access and anti-Asian hate violence to enhance vaccine confidence and uptake of COVID-19 and influenza vaccinations.

“The nearly 4,000 reported incidents of anti-Asian hate, and the countless acts of hate that go unrecorded, has had an impact on our communities to live safely, including getting vaccinated for COVID-19. Community members are scared to leave their homes and are not making appointments for the vaccinations for fear of being targeted,” said Priya Purandare, Executive Director of NAPABA. “In this environment, we especially want to ensure that the most vulnerable AANHPI persons are able to receive the vaccine: the elderly, those with limited English proficiency, recent arrivals, undocumented persons, those on the unconnected side of the digital divide, and others who lack access to COVID-19 information and vaccinations. We are honored to collaborate with APIAHF and over 20 partners nationwide to ensure vaccine confidence, access, and equity.”

In recognition that vaccine messaging will be conducted in the same communities experiencing increased threats and attacks based on the falsehood that AANHPIs are responsible for the pandemic, NAPABA and APIAHF have developed a ground-breaking collection of Combat Hate Crimes Toolkits translated into 25 different AANHPI languages – the largest compilation of its kind. These toolkits provide critical information for victims, community-based organizations, and community leaders on how to report attacks to law enforcement and how to help AANHPI communities deter future threats. NAPABA supports vaccination efforts by deploying these legal and advocacy educational resources in tandem with COVID-19 vaccine information so that AANHPI community members feel safe to leave the house, obtain their vaccines, and return to normalcy without suffering the additional threat of bias motivated attacks.

“NAPABA and its membership has THE largest nationwide boots on the ground reach of any AANHPI organization in the country, including in discrete and hard to reach areas where little infrastructure exists for the community,” said Juliet K. Choi, President and Executive Director of the APIAHF. “This historical and innovative strategic partnership with NAPABA will increase COVID-19 vaccination education by leveraging their members who are trusted civic leaders in their local communities that work to address community needs across a wide spectrum of issues.”

NAPABA plans to mobilize its nationwide network of nearly 90 affiliates and our members’ substantive legal expertise across a range of areas, drawing especially on its innovative work in linguistic access, and will be hiring an Education Coordinator for COVID-19 Vaccination Equity to help fulfill this mission.

###

The National Asian Pacific American Bar Association (NAPABA) represents the interests of approximately 50,000 legal professionals and nearly 90 national, state, and local Asian Pacific American bar associations. NAPABA is a leader in addressing civil rights issues confronting Asian Pacific American communities. Through its national network, NAPABA provides a strong voice for increased diversity of the federal and state judiciaries, advocates for equal opportunity in the workplace, works to eliminate hate crimes and anti-immigrant sentiment, and promotes the professional development of people of color in the legal profession.

NAPABA | 1612 K St. NW, Suite 510 | Washington, DC 20006 | www.napaba.org

Restaurant Revitalization Fund Application is Opening!

Register in the SBA application portal this Friday, April 30 (Portal opens 9 AM)

Applications will open on Monday, May 3 (12 PM EST)

The US Small Business Administration (SBA) is launching the Restaurant Revitalization Fund (RRF) to provide funding to help restaurants keep their doors open. Qualifying businesses may receive funding equal to their pandemic-related revenue loss, up to $5 million ($10 million per business entity with multiple locations). Received funds spent on eligible uses until March 11, 2023 do not have to be repaid.

Eligible entities who have experienced pandemic-related revenue loss:

  • Restaurants
  • Food stands, food trucks, food carts
  • Caterers
  • Bars, saloons, lounges, taverns
  • Snack and non-alcoholic beverage bars
  • Licensed facilities or premises of a beverage alcohol producer where the public may taste, sample, or purchase products

Eligible with onsite sales to the public comprise at least 33% of gross receipts:

  • Bakeries 
  • Brewpubs, tasting rooms, taprooms 
  • Breweries and/or microbreweries 
  • Wineries and distilleries 
  • Inns 

Is your business majority-owned by Asian owners? Businesses owned more than 51% by socially and economically disadvantaged individuals will be given priority for review in the first 21 days of applications. Make sure to check the box self-certifying you are a socially disadvantaged individual!

For detailed information: Restaurant Revitalization Fund (sba.gov)

RRF Program Guide in Asian languages are available here: Restaurant Revitalization Funding Program Guide (sba.gov)

Application will be available only in English and Spanish. Prepare required documents and fill out the application practice form included in the in-language guide beforehand to ensure you are prepared to apply when the program launches!

Simplified Chinese:                                                                                                                   

政府餐饮复兴基金(RRF现正接受申请!

请于4月30日,本周五(系统将于早上9点开放)在美国小商业管理局 (SBA) 的系统进行意向登记

正式申请系统将于53日,周一,中午1200后开放

美国小商业管理局(SBA) 正在启动餐饮复兴基金(RRF)计划,该计划将为餐饮企业提供资助帮助他们继续日常经营。符合资格的企业可获得与其受疫情影响损失营收额等额的资助,最高可达500万美元(若企业同时有多家店面运营,最高额可达1000万美元)。只要受领人在 2023 年 3 月 11 日之前将补助金用于合规的用途,其无需偿还该补助金。

并且您的企业营收在疫情期间受到了影响,并属于以下类别即可申请:

  • 餐馆
  • 餐车和路边摊档、
  • 饮食承办商、
  • 酒吧、酒庄、小旅馆
  • 零食店或非酒精类饮品店
  • 其它持牌经营的酒类生产或销售企业

以下类别企业若线下零售额占企业总营收33%,也具有申请资格:

  • 面包店
  • 酒馆、品酒室、生啤酒吧
  • 啤酒厂和/或微型酿酒厂
  • 葡萄酒庄和蒸馏酒厂
  • 小旅馆

您的企业股权主要所有人为是亚裔吗?若企业股权51%由社会与经济弱势族群所有,建议您在开放申请后的头21天进行申请,您的申请将会被优先考虑。若您是亚裔,请务必在填写申请时勾选正确选项声明您属于弱势族群。

更多信息请参考: 餐饮振兴基金SBA

亚洲语种项目介绍: 餐饮振兴基金项目指南

SBA提供了中文申请表格翻译供参考,但申请系统仅有英文与西语,请在申请系统开放前准备好相应的英文文件和信息方便您第一时间递交申请。

Korean:

레스토랑 재부양 기금 프로그램 접수가  시작됩니다!

오는 금요일 (4월 30일) 오전 9시 부터 SBA 포털에 사전 등록해 계정를 만드세요

기금 프로그램 접수 5 3  12 시작

내달 3일 (월요일) 부터 미국 중소기업청(SBA)이 식당들을 지원하는 레스토랑 활성화 펀드(RRF)를 출범합니다. 자격을 갖춘 업체는 팬더믹 관련 매출 손실 금액에 해당하는 자금 (업체당 최대 500만 달러, 다중 소재지 사업체당 1,000만 달러)에 해당하는 자금을 지원받을 수 있으며, 2023년 3월 11일까지 적격 용도에 사용한 수령 자금은 상환할 필요가 없습니다.

기금 신청 자격 대상

코로나바이러스 팬더믹으로 수익 감소를 겪었으며 현재 영구 폐점상태가 아닌:

  • 레스토랑
  • 푸드 스탠드, 푸드 트럭, 푸드 카트
  • 케이터링 업체
  • 바, 술집, 라운지, 선술집
  • 스낵 및 무알콜 음료 바
  • 제품 시음/샘플링/구매 가능한 알코올 음료 제조 업체의 시설 혹은 부지로 허가를 받은 곳

2019 총수입액의 최소 33% 현장 판매였음을 증명할  있는 경우

  • 베이커리
  • 브루펍, 테이스팅 룸, 탭룸
  • 맥주 양조장, 소규모 맥주 양조장
  • 와인 양조장 혹은 증류주 공장
  • 여관

혹시 사업체의 소유주가 과반수 이상 아시안이십니까? 사회적·경제적 약자가 51% 이상 소유한 사업체는 신청 후 21일 이내에 심사를 우선적으로 받게 됩니다. 기금 신청시 자신이 사회적 약자인 것을 스스로 증명하는 박스를 반드시 체크하세요!

자세한 사항은: Restaurant Revitalization Fund (sba.gov)

한국어 가이드 보기 : http://bit.ly/hangulrrf

RRF 기금 지원은 영어와 스페인어로만 가능합니다. 필수 문서를 미리 준비해두고 한국어 가이드에 지원서류 샘플에 따라 미리 양식을 작성해 두시면 당일 지원에 도움이 됩니다.

Nepali

रेस्टुरेन्ट पुनरुद्धार कोषकोलागि निवेदन खुल्दै !

एस.बी. आवेदन पोर्टलमा यो शुक्रवारअप्रिल 30 तारिक मा दर्ता गर्नुहोस् (पोर्टल 9 बिहान खुल्नेछ) 

आवेदन सोमबारमे  तारिक (१२ बजे ) खुल्नेछ।

अमेरिकाको सानो व्यवसाय प्रशासन (एस.बि.ए.) ले रेस्टुरेन्टहरुलाई पूर्ण ब्यवसाय संचालन गर्नकालागि मद्दत पुर्याउन रेस्टुरेन्ट पुनरुद्धार कोष (आर. आर. एफ) शुरू गर्दैछ। योग्य व्यवसायहरूले उनीहरूको कोभिड-१९महामारीले गर्दा भएको राजस्व घाटा बराबर कोष प्राप्त गर्न सक्दछ। एस कोषद्वारा व्यवसायहरुले ५ मिलियन डलर (बहुविध स्थानहरूभएकाले १० मिलियन) सम्मको कोष प्राप्त गर्न सक्नेछन्। मार्च ११, २०२३ सम्म योग्य प्रयोगहरूमा खर्च गरिएको रकम फिर्ता तिर्नु पर्दैन।

महामारीका कारणले राजस्व घाटा अनुभव गरेका छन् निम्न संस्थाले एस कोषकालागि निवेदन दिन सक्नेछन्

  • रेस्टुराँ 
  • खाना स्ट्यान्ड, फूड ट्रक, फूड कार्ट (खानाको ठेला-गाडीहरु)
  • क्याटररहरू
  • बार, सैलुन, लाउन्ज, टाभर्नहरु
  • खाजा र मदिराबाहेक अन्य पेय सामग्री बार
  • लाइसन्सकासाथ पेय मदिरा उत्पादक/ उत्पादन गर्ने केन्द्र अथवा परिसर जहाँ सार्वजनिक रुपले ति पदार्थ चाख्न, नमुना लिन अथवा खरिद गर्न सकिन्छ

सार्वजनिक रुपले तेही इस्थाल्मा बिक्रि गर्ने  कम्तिमा पनि अनसाइट बिक्री सार्वजनिक गर्न योग्य कम्तिमा कूल रसिद को 33 33% समावेश:

  • बेकरीहरू
  • कुनै बनाइने ठाउँहरु 

Is your business majority-owned by Asian owners? Businesses owned more than 51% by socially and economically disadvantaged individuals will be given priority for review in the first 21 days of applications. Make sure to check the box self-certifying you are a socially disadvantaged individual!

For detailed information: Restaurant Revitalization Fund (sba.gov)

RRF Program Guide in Asian languages are available here: Restaurant Revitalization Funding Program Guide (sba.gov)

निवेदन इस्पेनिश  अंग्रेजी भाषाहरुमा मात्र उपलब्ध हुनेछ। आवश्यक कागजातहरू तयार गर्नुहोस्  निवेदन फारमज  तपाई प्रोग्राम सुरू हुन्छन् आवेदन गर्नको लागि तयार हुनुहुन्छ भनेर निश्चित गर्न इनभाषा गाईडमा समावेश गरिएको आवेदन अभ्यास फारम भर्नुहोस्।