Stand With Us and Support the Pro Bono Clinic on GivingTuesday, Dec. 3, 2019

Happy Thanksgiving!

GivingTuesday is being held this year on December 3. It is a global movement that began in 2012, and the idea behind it is simple: Do good and help transform your community with your generosity. During this holiday season, we ask that you support our Pro Bono Legal Advice and Referral Clinic, a project of the Asian American Bar Association of New York (AABANY) and the Asian American Law Fund of New York (AALFNY).

The Pro Bono Clinic began in December 2015 and has since served thousands of low-income clients facing various legal hardships. The Clinic has been held in Manhattan’s Chinatown on the second Wednesday of each month since that time. The success of our Clinics in Manhattan has led to an expansion into Brooklyn, which started this fall on a bimonthly basis. We work with local elected officials and community organizations to reach Brooklyn’s Asian American community and draw upon the expertise and language skills of AABANY’s active and diverse membership to serve them. Clients have been coming not only from the five boroughs but from as far as Yonkers, Long Island, New Jersey, and Connecticut.

Our Clinics provide high-quality legal services that are culturally sensitive and linguistically competent. Language and culture pose serious barriers for low-income Asian American community members to receive reliable legal advice. Our Clinics help community members overcome these barriers and seek to widen their access to justice. The Clinics now include mental health professionals and benefits counselors to help community members with their non-legal problems.

Hundreds of volunteers have dedicated thousands of hours for the Pro Bono Clinics. Month after month, they freely donate their time, expertise and legal knowledge to help community members who otherwise would not get the help they need.

Our Pro Bono Clinics can only continue to operate with the generosity of our donors. In September, we announced our goal to raise $25,000 to support the Clinic’s growing operations. We ask that you stand with us and support this vital project. Help us not only to reach our goal of raising $25,000 — through your donations on GivingTuesday – but exceed it! Your donations will support our ongoing expansion efforts and pay for much needed administrative support and supplies.

To make it easier for our members and our community to donate to the Pro Bono Clinic, you can text APAPROBONO to 44321 on your phone. That will send you to our Give Lively page, and you can follow the simple instructions there to make your contribution. You can also donate via the AALFNY website at https://www.asianamericanlawfund.org/donate/ (make sure to indicate that you are donating to the Clinic). Any amount, large or small, will go a long way towards helping us meet our $25,000 goal.

With our best wishes to you all during this holiday season,

Karen Kithan Yau
Pauline Yeung-Ha
Judy Ming Chu Lee
Asako Aiba
Co-Chairs, AABANY Pro Bono and Community Service Committee

A copy of AALFNY’s latest annual report may be obtained from AALFNY at  donations@AsianAmericanLawFund.org or from the NY Attorney General’s Charities Bureau website www.charitiesnys.com. Information may also be obtained from the NYS Attorney General at 212-416-8686.

Hurricane Irma Resources

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Dear colleagues, 

Our thoughts and prayers are with the communities across Florida, the Southeast, and the Caribbean impacted by the devastation left by Hurricane Irma.

NAPABA and our Florida affiliates, the Asian Pacific American Bar Association of Tampa Bay, the Asian American Bar Association of South Florida, and the Greater Orlando Asian American Bar Association are working with community leaders to assist with the recovery and support the Asian Pacific American and other communities.

To assist attorneys and community members find resources and information for the Asian Pacific American community, we have updated our Hurricane Harvey and Hurricane Irma disaster relief toolkit to direct you to information and opportunities to engage with legal services organizations.

Requests for legal assistance should be directed to Florida’s Disaster Legal Services hotline at 1-866-550-2929. We encourage Florida barred attorneys to sign up to provide pro bono services for this program—sponsored by the American Bar Association and the Florida Bar—by clicking here.

I am heartened by the response of the legal community to support those affected by these recent disasters during the long recovery process. Together, we can continue to represent our profession’s highest values and serve those in need.

Sincerely,

Cyndie M. Chang
NAPABA President 2016–17

NAPABA Opposes Proposed Elimination of Funding to the Legal Services Corporation

For Immediate Release
March 16, 2017

For More Information, Contact: 
Brett Schuster, Communications Manager
bschuster@napaba.org, 202-775-9555

WASHINGTON — The National Asian Pacific American Bar Association (NAPABA) strongly opposes the elimination of federal funding for the Legal Services Corporation (LSC) as detailed in President Trump’s proposed Fiscal Year 2018 budget. The LSC was formed with the critical mission of ensuring that all citizens have equal access to civil legal services and the justice system — regardless of their ability to pay for counsel.

“We call on Congress to reject this proposal and increase funding for the Legal Services Corporation,” said NAPABA President Cyndie M. Chang. “As Congress has recognized in a bipartisan manner, the LSC plays a critical role in ensuring access to justice for individuals of all backgrounds, regards of their ability to pay. Asian Pacific American attorneys work for legal aid programs funded by the LSC and engage in pro bono community assistance programs that have their roots in the LSC. Most significantly, the elimination of funding means that the most vulnerable in our country would not receive critical legal assistance.”

Each year, LSC assists 1.9 million families across the country in every state in our nation. Clients of legal services organizations represent all ethnicities and ages, including those who are limited English proficient, immigrants, the working poor, veterans, people facing foreclosure or evictions, families with children, farmers, people with disabilities, domestic violence victims, natural disaster victims, and the elderly. Without the strong support of civil legal aid, these individuals would be faced with the prospect of appearing in court alone and representing themselves, without the assistance of counsel.

NAPABA stands with other bar associations (including the American Bar Association), over 150 major law firms, and countless advocates who have spoken out on the importance of adequately funding the LSC. NAPABA strongly supports the LSC and efforts to provide legal assistance to vulnerable populations.

For more information, the media may contact Brett Schuster, NAPABA communications manager, at 202-775-9555 or bschuster@napaba.org.

The National Asian Pacific American Bar Association (NAPABA) is the national association of Asian Pacific American attorneys, judges, law professors, and law students. NAPABA represents the interests of almost 50,000 attorneys and approximately 75 national, state, and local Asian Pacific American bar associations. Its members include solo practitioners, large firm lawyers, corporate counsel, legal services and non-profit attorneys, and lawyers serving at all levels of government.

NAPABA continues to be a leader in addressing civil rights issues confronting Asian Pacific American communities. Through its national network of committees and affiliates, NAPABA provides a strong voice for increased diversity of the federal and state judiciaries, advocates for equal opportunity in the workplace, works to eliminate hate crimes and anti-immigrant sentiment, and promotes the professional development of people of color in the legal profession.

To learn more about NAPABA, visit www.napaba.org, like us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter (@NAPABA).

An Open Letter from the MinKwon Center

An Open Letter from the MinKwon Center

Legal Services NYC Annual Diversity Open House

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February 27, 2014 – Diversity Open House is an unique opportunity for law students to learn about the important work done at Legal Services NYC, to meet our attorneys and find out about internship, fellowship and possible employment opportunities. Legal Services NYC is the largest provider of free civil legal services in the country and has neighborhood programs in all five boroughs. See, www.legalservicesnyc.org

The format of the Open House is fairly informal. The first hour of the program is table time. Each Legal Services NYC program will have a table staffed by an attorney or two who is available to meet with law students. Then there is a program consisting of brief staff presentations about our vital work and innovative projects. After these presentations there is time for more tabling. The Open House will end with a reception with light refreshments and this is another opportunity for students to meet and network with staff attorneys. Leadership from the various offices will attend the event

All law students must rsvp by February 20, 2014 to diversitycommittee@ls-nyc. org

Open House Program

4:30pm to 5:30pm – Networking and Tabling

5:30pm to 6:15 pm – Welcome: Raun Rasmussen

Innovative Projects Presentations on

  • Immigration Law Project
  • LGBTQI Project
  • Veterans Justice Project
  • Loan Forgiveness Programs

6:15pm to 7:30pm – Networking and Tabling

Parents Protest Emergency Calls

Parents Protest Emergency Calls

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Nelson Mar, Bronx Legal Services attorney, education law specialist and an AABANY member, was quoted in a  September 16 WNYC news story entitled “Sending Disruptive Students to the E.R. Worries Docs, Advocates.”

“On the one hand it’s a little shocking but on the other hand it’s not surprising,” said Nelson Mar, an attorney at Bronx Legal Services, about the patterns. Some of the District 75 schools in buildings that made many calls are known for taking large concentrations of students who are classified as emotionally disturbed.

You can read the full story on the WNYC.org website or listen to it by clicking on the link above.