AABANY Student Outreach Committee Hosts a Panel Discussion about Being a Virtual Summer Associate on June 3rd

On June 3rd, the Asian American Bar Association of New York’s Student Outreach Committee (SOC) hosted a panel discussion about the dos and don’ts of being a virtual summer associate. Haynes and Boone summer associate and SOC Student Leader Julie Choe moderated the panel. The panelists were Andrew T. Hahn, Sr., General Counsel and Chief Diversity Officer at Hawkins Delafield & Wood and past AABANY President in 2004; Jeeho Lee, hiring partner at O’Melveny & Myers; Taiyee Chien, summer associate at Kirkland & Ellis and SOC Student Leader; and Victor Roh, summer associate at Davis Polk & Wardwell and SOC Marketing Director and Student Leader.

Julie opened the event by introducing the panelists for the evening. The student leaders then shared their experiences as (virtual) summer associates, and discussed a variety of topics with the other panelists including how to gain diverse work experience, how to reach out to partners, the advantages and disadvantages of a remote program, work-life balance, and more. The panelists also discussed the qualities of a good summer associate, which included being attentive to detail, respectful, taking responsibility for mistakes, being responsive to emails, and keeping your camera on during meetings. The panelists also emphasized the importance of building your own unique “brand” at the firm from your particular strengths and character. After the event, the discussion was opened to the attendees for questions.

AABANY thanks SOC for hosting this timely event in the midst of the pandemic and thanks the panelists for sharing their thoughts and experiences about summer associate programs. AABANY SOC will also be hosting several upcoming events, including a mock interview workshop and two panel discussions as part of the Students Meet Firms series. The first panel will feature attorneys from Cleary Gottlieb. The second presentation will discuss the legal recruiting process with recruiters at Shearman & Sterling. To learn more about AABANY’s SOC, click here. To join the SOC slack channel, click here.

AABANY Hosts Fundraising Event on May 21 to Support Welcome to Chinatown’s Longevity Fund

On May 21, in observance of Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) Heritage Month, AABANY’s Legal Referral and Information Service (LRIS) hosted an event titled “A Brief History of Anti-Asian Racism in America and Call to Action” to raise funds for Welcome to Chinatown’s Longevity Fund. Welcome to Chinatown is a grassroots initiative working to preserve New York City’s Chinatown by supporting small businesses and amplifying community voices. In 2020, they launched The Longevity Fund, a small business relief program, to support small businesses where cultural and socioeconomic barriers have prevented them from applying for assistance programs.

The first part of the fundraising event consisted of a presentation from Chris Kwok, AABANY Board Director, Asia Practice Committee Co-Chair, and Issues Committee Chair, on the history of anti-Asian racism in America. He provided an overview of the history of sinophobia and anti-Asian violence in the United States, highlighting the passage of laws including the Naturalization Act of 1790, the Page Act of 1875, and the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. Chris also shared the common themes of how Asian Americans have been perceived throughout history and are still seen today as “forever foreign.”

The presentation was followed by an informal Q&A session between Moderator Tiffany Miao, and William Ng, AABANY President-Elect and LRIS Panel Member, on the importance of AAPI representation in the legal profession and how AAPI lawyers can play a role in preserving Asian cultures and communities for future generations. After listening to Chris’ presentation, William spoke about how the history of sinophobia in the U.S. was never taught in school and how it is important to push towards adding it to school curriculums. Chris added that it’s critical for individuals to understand how race works with Asian Americans—although there’s similarity with how African Americans and Jews experience race, there are still differences and nuances. As for how AAPI lawyers can support AAPI communities, William stated, “While it’s a good career opportunity to do meaningful work, this time in particular, Asian Americans have an opportunity to do more, push certain initiatives.” In addition to representing Asian American clients at work, AAPI lawyers can donate to organizations such as Welcome to Chinatown, and join AABANY’s LRIS to provide legal assistance to the Asian American community.

To join AABANY’s LRIS, please email joinlris@aabany.org for an application. To learn more about Welcome to Chinatown, please visit welcometochinatown.com and check out their Instagram account @welcome.to.chinatown

At the conclusion of the fundraiser, AABANY was able to raise $2000 for The Longevity Fund. Thank you to everyone who joined us for the event, and thanks especially to all the donors for their support.

AABANY Hosts “The Surge in Anti-Asian Violence: Corporate Social Responsibility and Action” on April 9

On April 9, 2021, AABANY and a coalition of bar associations from across the country presented a CLE program titled, “The Surge in Anti-Asian Violence: Corporate Social Responsibility and Action.” About 500 attendees from all across the United States joined an esteemed panel of corporate in-house leaders in a discussion on how corporate employers can address the surge in anti-Asian violence and support their Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) employees. The panel included:

  • Sara Yang Bosco, Senior Vice President, Secretary and General Counsel, Emerson
  • Sam Khichi, Executive Vice President, General Counsel, Public Policy & Regulatory Affairs, Becton, Dickinson and Company
  • Sandra Leung, Executive Vice President & General Counsel, Bristol Myers Squibb
  • Allen Lo, Vice President and Deputy General Counsel Products, IP, and Legal Operations, Facebook
  • Susan Moon, Principal Counsel, The Walt Disney Company
  • Caroline Tsai, Chief Legal Officer & Corporate Secretary, Western Union
  • Michael C. Wu (Moderator), GAPABA Board Member

Moderator Michael Wu began the panel discussion by describing how the coronavirus pandemic has become a virus of hate, with the increase of violence and hate crimes against Asian Americans. To add to this, Sara Bosco emphasized the importance of reporting and providing visibility to these incidents and stated, “You cannot manage what you cannot measure.” Asian Americans comprise 6% of the United States population, yet have been historically overlooked despite being part of U.S. history since the 1800s. Due to Asian Americans being viewed as perpetual foreigners and the model minority, coupled with the inaccurate information disseminated about the origins of the pandemic in 2020, Asian Americans have been perceived as an easier target to perpetrators of anti-Asian violence.

When asked how Corporate America should address anti-Asian violence, many of the panelists shared initiatives their workplaces started and gave suggestions on what companies can do. A main focus of the panelists was discussing how Asian employees can be supported in the workplace. To create a supportive environment, companies should reach out to AAPI employees and create an AAPI employee resource group in the workplace if there is not one already. Even if the organization does not have many AAPI employees, it is important for AAPI employees to meet others to increase their circle and build a larger voice. In addition, mental health resources and allyship training should be offered to employees within the workplace’s HR department. Panelists also agreed that not only should the diversity officers in the company address anti-Asian violence, but even CEOs need to speak up and make statements to show support for the AAPI community.

As individuals in the AAPI legal community, Sandra Leung said, “We are in a crisis situation right now with the rise of anti-AAPI hate, but it’s also an opportunity for us to band together to do our part individually or collectively in groups. We have to turn the emotion and anger that we have into action.” She further emphasized that we need to take leadership roles, speak loud, and educate people on anti-AAPI hate. In discussing leadership roles, Sandra Leung remarked, “I feel so compelled right now and so moved by everything we are facing in our community that I would love to run for President-Elect of NAPABA…” AABANY applauds Sandra Leung’s intent to run during these critical times and agrees that we have to continue working collectively to address anti-Asian violence.

Thank you to Sara Yang Bosco, Sam Khichi, Sandra Leung, Allen Lo, Susan Moon, Caroline Tsai, and Michael Wu for this important discussion on anti-Asian violence and corporate social responsibility. Non-transitional New York attorneys were eligible to receive a maximum of 1.5 CLE credit hours applied toward the Diversity, Inclusion, and Elimination of Bias requirement. CLE credits were also approved in California and Colorado, and CPE credits were approved in British Columbia and Ontario. CLE credits have been applied for in Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Texas, and are pending approval. To view a recording of the program, click here or on the image above.

Purchase the 2020 NAPABA Convention On-Demand CLE Pass

NAPABA is currently offering On-Demand CLE Pass that is available for purchase. This pass contains over 2230 minutes of eligible on-demand CLE including Ethics and Elimination of Bias credit in some jurisdictions.

Click here to purchase the on-demand CLE pass.

On-Demand CLE Credit Information

  1. This program offers a maximum of 2230 minutes of CLE including up to 120 minutes of Ethics credit and 180 minutes of Elimination of Bias credit in some jurisdictions.
  2. Please note, you can watch a session as many times as you wish, but you can only receive CLE credit one time.
  3. If you watched the program when it took place live from Nov. 4-7, you will not receive CLE credit for viewing the on-demand presentation. You will only receive CLE credit (depending on your jurisdiction) for any new programs you watch on-demand.
  4. To receive on-demand CLE credit for sessions viewed, collect the code words stated during each CLE presentation you view and submit the CLE codes words to this survey (https://www.surveymonkey.de/r/62DKVS8) to verify your attendance. Please collect all code words for the sessions you are seeking on-demand CLE credit and submit ONE survey by December 11 at 5 p.m. ET.


You will only have access to the library until December 8 
– Don’t delay!

In addition to CLE sessions, you also gain access to other on-demand content such as:

• Plenaries: Gain access to three thought-provoking plenary sessions covering topics such as voting rights, diversity and inclusion, and AAPIs as allies. 

• Keynote Series: An exclusive series of conversations with high-profile speakers who represent the diversity–both in politics, experience, and demographics–in our country.

• Entertainment Breaks: Pick up a new hobby this holiday season! Check out our various entertainment breaks such as yoga, dancing, or even a cooking class!

If you registered for the live event, you already have access to the 2020 NAPABA Convention | Virtual Experience On-Demand Pass. To access the sessions, log into the virtual platform and find the CLE session in the Agenda. Once you click the agenda item, you will see the video on the page.

NYC Care is Now Available Citywide

Membership in NYC Care is now available to New Yorkers in each borough. NYC Care is a health care access program for people who are not eligible for or cannot afford health insurance. The program ensures all New Yorkers, regardless of their income or immigration status, have equal access to comprehensive, high-quality care.

NYC Care members can benefit from personalized, coordinated care and, most importantly, the confidence and safety that comes from belonging to a system that cares about their health and their future.

With NYC Care, you can:

  • Receive care at NYC H+H locations across the city.
  • Receive preventative care, mental health support, and substance abuse services. 
  • Talk to customer service representatives in your language. 
  • Receive 24 hour access to low-cost prescription medications. 
  • Get your first appointment in two weeks or less.

To enroll, call 646-NYC-CARE.

To learn more about NYC Care, visit nyccare.nyc.

Please join the effort to spread the word in your community about this important service through our multilingual fliers below (or click here for more resources): 

Apply for NAPABA’s Leadership Advancement Program

NAPABA’s Leadership Advancement Program is a year-long experiential program targeted at building leadership skills by allowing rising attorneys to step into their own leadership style, while providing an opportunity to foster genuine relationships with peers within the profession, especially between in-house counsel (IHC) and law firm attorneys. 

Here are just a few accomplishments from our last cohort since they completed the program:

Visit our website to learn more about the program’s requirements and see how you’ll benefit from being part of this opportunity.

Apply here. The application deadline is Thursday, March 12.

Empire Justice Center Diversity Clerkship Program – Rochester, New York

This program seeks to increase diversity in the legal profession in the Rochester area by attracting qualified second-year law students from historically under-represented groups, including racial and ethnic minorities or those who grew up in low income households, to work in a paid position with our organization. By providing a Rochester-based work experience to law students of diverse backgrounds, we believe we are moving toward the long-term goal of increasing diversity in the legal community.

Empire Justice Center strongly believes that a diverse work force results in better service to clients and a better work environment for attorneys and staff. We are committed to recruiting, retaining and promoting attorneys who contribute to the overall diversity of the legal community in Rochester.

The summer clerkship is expected to run for no longer than ten weeks in total and will include a $6,650 stipend.

Program Specifics (subject to change):

1. Application: Eligible second year law students are required to submit a formal application, current resume, law school transcripts, a personal statement and the designated writing sample on or before the submission deadline of Thursday October 30, 2014 to diversityclerkship@empirejustice.org.

2. Interview: Based on the application materials submitted, qualified candidates will be invited to Rochester for an interview conducted by members of the Diversity Clerkship Hiring Committee and various staff attorneys of the organization, on Saturday November 22, 2014.

Students must secure their own transportation to Rochester for the interviews; however, students facing challenges traveling to Rochester should contact Rebecah Corcoran for potential assistance or to discuss alternatives.

3. Selection Process: After the interviews, the Diversity Clerkship Hiring Committee will rank students based on the following criteria (being an agent for social and economic change, commitment to and interest in legal services, writing skills and interview/interpersonal skills) and then will select the student who will be offered the Clerkship, along with alternates.

4. Offers: The selected student will be given three days to accept the initial offer. If the offer is declined, the position will be extended to an alternate until the position is filled.

TO OBTAIN AN APPLICATION ON PLEASE VISIT

www.empirejustice.org, Your Career Placement Office or Symplicity.

SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF NEW YORK SEEKING CANDIDATES FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE ACT MENTORING PROGRAM

NOTICE TO THE BAR

CONTACT: Peter Quijano, 212-686-0666; or Anthony L. Ricco, 212-791-3919

SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF NEW YORK SEEKING CANDIDATES FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE ACT MENTORING PROGRAM

The United States District Court for the Southern District of New York is seeking candidates for its Criminal Justice Act (CJA) Mentoring Program. Ideal candidates are attorneys with five or more years of experience litigating in state court, with fifteen felony trials to verdict as lead counsel or comparable in-court experience under their belt. Under the supervision of a member of the CJA Panel, CJA Mentees would represent defendants in federal court who qualify for appointed representation under the Criminal Justice Act.

The purpose of the CJA Mentoring Program is to diversify the composition of the CJA Panel—a roster of private attorneys who are authorized to serve as appointed defense counsel pursuant to 18 U.S.C. § 3006A—and to expose experienced state court practitioners to federal practice. While the mentee’s initial 15 hours of service will be done pro bono, mentees may earn a reduced rate of $65 per hour for their services after the pro bono requirement has been fulfilled.

Candidate interviews will be conducted in early June. To apply for the program, please e-mail your resume by June 4 to:

Peter Enrique Quijano
Quijano & Ennis, P.C.
peter@qandelaw.com

“The CJA Mentoring Program offers attorneys a unique opportunity to expand their practice and learn from some of the top criminal defense attorneys in the nation,” said Chief Judge Loretta A. Preska. “The Court is fortunate to benefit from such an excellent program and grateful for the time and attention contributed by the mentor lawyers.”

The mentorship program is open to anyone who qualifies, and women, minorities, and persons with disabilities are particularly encouraged to apply. Participation in the mentorship program does not guarantee appointment to the CJA Panel.

Convergence: NAPABA Convention 2014

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Don’t miss out on the 2014 Annual NAPABA Convention! There are many ways to get involved starting now. You can:

For more information on the Convention, including how to make your room reservation at the Westin Kierland Resort and Spa, click here.